• Mobile App For Android Now Online!

    Download it here. The app is searchable in the Google Play Store under Sailboat Owners.

    Sorry iPhone/iPad users, we are still waiting on Apple. :(

    Click the X in the upper right corner to make this go away

Shopping for boats and could use some advice.

Jul 7, 2004
6,877
Hunter 30T Cheney, KS
We always found the tiller to be a nuisance if you have many people on board. Anyone sitting on the opposite side of it has to move when you tack and change sides to sit windward. With a wheel everyone can stay put.
 
Nov 8, 2010
11,045
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
Well it sounds like you made up your mind on the boat you want; I'd hate to get in the way of that! '^)

If you're OK with the ramp aspect, then have a go. Just make sure the ramp extends to the point where you are over your head walking in before it falls off into deep water. You'll really have to back in far. Really far.

I always recommend a person learns with a tiller. It IS the natural way to drive a sailboat... Ideally then you can if you want move to wheel. Its kinda like learning to driving a car with a manual transmission. You know how it works inside the car and have better intuitive feel for driving. You can always move to wheel/auto, buts its very hard to learn the other way around.

Regarding the OMC saildrive, first off having an inboard is a GREAT THING. The only potential downside on a boat of that vintage is if the OMC unit fails in a bad way, the cost to fix might come close to the value of your boat. You could always stick an OB on the transom, but that's an awkward design for a OB.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes: Parsons
Nov 8, 2010
11,045
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
We always found the tiller to be a nuisance if you have many people on board. Anyone sitting on the opposite side of it has to move when you tack and change sides to sit windward. With a wheel everyone can stay put.
I've never really understood this argument. Its a SAILBOAT. For efficient operation people are supposed to move. Don't want to 'inconvenience' people? Get a powerboat.
 
Jul 7, 2004
6,877
Hunter 30T Cheney, KS
It's a fact. Even if you are in a SAILBOAT, if you just want to cruise with some friends and not concerned about efficiency, moving is an interruption. Especially in a smaller cockpit. Racing or sailing for speed is a different story. There's a different mindset with the crew. Crew vs guests.
 
Oct 22, 2014
12,836
CAL 35 Cruiser Portland OR, moored EVERETT WA
There's a different mindset with the crew. Crew vs guests.
I would agree that the mindset is different. Then there is the reason the guests joined you on the sailboat. Crew know you have to move when the helm is put to lee guest are surprised and perhaps thrilled to have the experience. It doesn't take too many times then they find a spot that suits them. Perhaps getting involved with the experience and taking a line, or seeking the cabin and their iPhone. Both are acceptable, but I would ask the line holder back for another sail.
 
Nov 8, 2010
11,045
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
I didn't say I was right, just that I didn't understand.... ;^)

But still. I drive boats with both steering systems all the time. On the tiller boats, 98% of the time the tiller end is between the cockpit seat walls and not in anyone's way. For the 2% of the time were I need to push or pull it hard, I simply stand up, put the tiller between my legs, and bend the tiller up and the stem. Now I can drive without inconveniencing anyone.
 
Last edited:
Jul 7, 2004
6,877
Hunter 30T Cheney, KS
I never asked previous guests if they liked moving. Only that they needed to so I could man the tiller properly. I do know that when the same guests were invited back onto our larger wheel boat the consensus was "this is nice". Never
"we miss the shuffling". Again, crew vs guests. My vote is for a wheel no matter what type of sailing I do. YMMV
 
Jul 7, 2004
6,877
Hunter 30T Cheney, KS
I didn't say I was right, just that I didn't understand.... ;^)

But still. I drive boats with both searing systems all the time. On the tiller boats, 98% of the time the tiller end is between the cockpit seat walls and not in anyone's way. For the 2% of the time were I need to push or pull it hard, I simply stand up, put the tiller between my legs, and bend the tiller up and the stem. Now I can drive without inconveniencing anyone.
Peace JD. I understand where you are coming from.
 
Jun 11, 2004
986
Oday 31 Redondo Beach
Im doing a LOT of reading and asking a ton of questions... I REALY like the idea of the helm steering vs the rudder... it seems like it makes the cockpit more "freindly." Am I wrong?

In general the tiller will be better for response and feel for what the boat is doing while sailing. From a cockpit friendly standpoint, with the wheel there will be more room in the cockpit while sailing and with the tiller there will be more room in the cockpit while at the dock, mooring or anchor because you can usually swing the tiller up and out of the way. Just my opinion.
 
Jan 19, 2010
8,683
Hunter 26 Charleston
Not picking sides on the tiller vs. wheel debate but...

I would also add that it is much easier and less expensive to add an auto-tiller to a tiller than and auto-pilot to a wheel-steered sailboat. With that said, I do like the ability to hang instrument panels on the steering console and sitting square in a seat for long periods of time is easier than the posture one takes at a tiller. (but if you have an auto-tiller does it really matter?)

For example, I picked up a used auto-tiller on eBay this summer for a few hundred dollars and installed it myself for zero dollars. :thumbup:

On the sail drive issue... I think some of the negative opinions about sail drives stems from the ease with which they can be damaged if you hit any flotsam or other debris in the water. That is probably not a big concern for a lake sailor. So maybe don't factor that in so much. I've always viewed the sail drive debate as being parallel to the spade rudder vs. keel hung rudder vs. skeg hung rudder debate.

How safe is your rudder: http://www.hydrovane.com/self-steering/articles/#Simpson-Article
 
Nov 8, 2010
11,045
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
On the sail drive issue... I think some of the negative opinions about sail drives stems from the ease with which they can be damaged if you hit any flotsam or other debris in the water. That is probably not a big concern for a lake sailor. So maybe don't factor that in so much. I've always viewed the sail drive debate as being parallel to the spade rudder vs. keel hung rudder vs. skeg hung rudder debate.
I think you might be confusing two issues.

Old OMC saildrives were notorious for corroding, and parts are now no longer available. I'd think of it as a long term liability. Other might feel differently.

New (Volvo and Yanmar) saildrives have an excellent operational record, and are probably more safe (stronger and closer to the keel) from strikes than exposed shafts. Some do wonder about the rubber diagram that keeps water out, but I know of not a single failure of this causing a flooding or sinking. I do do listen.
 
Jan 19, 2010
8,683
Hunter 26 Charleston
I think you might be confusing two issues.
More like I switched gears and failed to be clear.

I get your point about cost to fix. I was pointing out the reasoning some have for distrusting sail drives. Im not one of those people.

Ill admit that I distrust diesels. And I know Im in a very small minority on that stance. Seems like every day someone posts an issue with their diesel ... or the fuel going bad ... or the filter.... or the stuffing box... etc. I'm not crossing oceans so I'll stick with an O.B.
 
Jun 8, 2004
8,241
-na -NA Anywhere USA
Not sure if the fellow actually bought a boat but it would appear so. As a dealer, I taught my salespeople to sit down and ask every perspective buyer who came thru the door questions so that customer would answer those questions narrowing the field as to what they wanted to do with a sailboat, what amenities needed on that boat and price range either monthly payment or total cost or both. Not only did this save time vs. showing everything, it helped to make better suggestions. Regarding used, we went thru the various sources on line to see what was out there. If it was a private sale or another broker that did not share a listing, my salesmen graciously referred that buyer although there were no commissions and made sure what to look for. When I see someone who is new on this forum, that is a good approach but I do state I am retired and not selling any boats anymore so there is nothing to gain. I was asked that question if I was selling and of course no. Sometimes I am asked why I donate my time to this forum, God was good to me and I give back reminding that many on this forum also donate their valuable time to help potential and current sailors who need help. I wanted to pass this on and to those who contribute, A Thank YOU goes out to you all.
 
Last edited:
Dec 19, 2006
5,661
Hunter 36 Punta Gorda
Crazy Dave
I am sure you don't remember me but pretty sure it was 2000 that we talked about
a Hunter 260 and at the time it was going to be my first real sailboat after sailing a 16 Hobbie and you were fantastic with helping me on the phone and also was looking to move to NC.
I did not move to NC and did not buy the 260 but did buy 2001 Hunter 290 after my wife said no to me and said no more trailing and in 2006 she also said no to buying a Hunter 33 and also said to buy my now Hunter 36 instead and every guy at the boat show asked me if she had a sister.
But any way you went above and beyond to help me decide which size boat for me,I
had a friend with a private slip and was still working and decide it was going to be better a little bigger and a boat in the water and on weekends just go down to the boat and I got go sailing so much more sailing,I did not buy a boat from you but helped any way.
Nick
 
Nov 8, 2010
11,045
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
More like I switched gears and failed to be clear.
I get your point about cost to fix. I was pointing out the reasoning some have for distrusting sail drives. Im not one of those people.
OK cool gotcha. I've just never heard that argument against sail-drives, and would argue with anyone that said that, because they ARE less likely to be damaged, due to the reasons I stated.
 
Dec 13, 2010
123
Hake 32RK Red Bank
My first boat was a 22' Catalina with swing keel and popup camper roof. It was easy to sail and easy to trailer and stepping the mast by myself was no big deal but it took time every time I wanted to go someplace new. I regretted buying it after my first launch and sail only because of the advice I had been given but ignored-buy the biggest boat you can afford. It quickly became apparent that it was too small for the sailing I wanted to do. Not sure about the other models or your price range but if I were doing it over again at that size I'd consider a Hake Seaward 26 footer (Seaward Marine just bought out Island Packet and Blue Jacket Yachts last year). It has a vertically retracting fin keel with a bulb and so you get trailerability along with shoal draft and it can sail to windward unlike any swing keel boat. My current boat is a Seaward 32 and it has a trailer and I did move it twice a year from storage to slip and back but its not the kind of thing you'd pull anywhere on a weekend. The 26 though would be and it has been designed for one person mast stepping that is really slick. I suspect a used one would be a lot more than the three you're looking at though. Still I like these boats!
 
Jul 7, 2004
6,877
Hunter 30T Cheney, KS
I like the Seaward design but I think it was intended for gunkholing, not trailering.
Post pics when you find your boat!
 
Jun 9, 2008
1,619
- -- -Bayfield
Older Catalina 25's had a swing keel. A similar boat is the O'day 25. Both available with fin keels (at the time) or swing keels. Launching a fin keel boat is easier than getting back on the trailer. And like Jackdaw said, you have to have the perfect set up or you will increase your level of frustration. Perfect set up is a deep enough ramp that has a good bottom and no drop offs; keel guides to assure your boat loads in the middle every time; a good trailer bow support with a winch that is properly located at the right height with a very strong bow eye properly located, so when you do pull the boat, it loads exactly where you want it. The C&C is a very well made vessel and sails very well. The OMC Zephyr Sail Drive is a 2 cycle outboard installed like an inboard. They are hard to find parts for (I used to install them from scratch). When they run well they are great. When you need parts, that becomes a problem. It appears that you are looking for a larger boat for comfort, yet you want trailerability. Another boat to consider is a C&C Mega 30 which has a retractable keel with an electric winch (and a manual back up). It was designed by the late Peter Barrett. Sails well (PHRF 136 or 8 about) and has some interior. The rudder is kick up and it came with a mast raising system. No wide load permits required as it was 8.5' Sort of an odd looking duck, but a good boat never the less.