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Oday 39 racing

May 1, 2019
7
oday 39 39 Morgana Jacksonville fl
Was wondering if anyone else out there was racing the Oday 39? I feel it is a pretty quick boat, that sails very well. What has your experience been with racing the boat? I've raced PHRF for years and but since switching to the Oday 39 I am having some difficulty doing well in the races I have done. Short of replacing the sails which are in excellent condition, I am not really sure where to go from here to get the speed my handicap requires to do well. There is definitely room for improvement in most areas (starts, tacking) but at this point I don't think I am racing any sloppier then anyone else on course.
Thanks
 
May 6, 2010
392
1984 Oday 39 79 Milwaukee
This is our first (partial) season with our 39. We don't race, but the occasions we have had to sail I have been pretty happy with the performance. If you tune your own rig, I'd be curious what settings you are using?
 
May 23, 2016
155
O'Day 1984 23 Island Park, NY
One thing is that with an old boat it will behave sloppier than it might have when the handicap was established... How is the riging? Dacron or higher tech? When was it last tuned? By whom?
 
Mar 29, 2017
321
Hunter 30t littlecreek
Took me 5 years of trying before I figured out the racing thing and started beating other boats. Try to steal experienced crew And learn how to tune rig. Also clean bottom and empty boat helps too
 
May 1, 2019
7
oday 39 39 Morgana Jacksonville fl
Thank you for the replies.
As far as the rigging it seems to be in good working order, I have gone thru measured for straightness and checked to make sure the tension on both sides it the same, she seems to sail pretty similar on both tacks. I did bend the mast back a little (about 2") because I thought the main may have too much luff curve ( about 7 inches, which I have yet to get a good answer from anyone on to see it that is good or bad) but I think this is was unnecessary, as we don't get much weather helm until about 18knots, and I did this after a race we had where it was gusting to 30knots all day 20+ all day and I had bad weather helm, and had a hard time flattening the main. But I don't usually sail in that kind of wind, so I have pretty much set the mast back straight again maybe 1" of bend. The recommendations I have got is to keep it straight, tight forestay and no slopping shrouds on the leeward side. How tight do you set your for and fore and back stay I have an old tension gauge, not sure it will give me an accurate number read but I can use it compare it to the shrouds?
The sails are Dacron with a full batten main, loose foot and 135 roller furling jib. I am not in love with them by any means but that is an expensive investment and am trying to make sure I'm not missing something first. Also I don't think they look to bad when trimmed. They are still crisp, I don't think they are too stretched out. I am only guessing this because the previous owner didn't use the boat and I have had it for 2 years now and have probably only put 100-200 hours on them. (Couple Bahamas trips and about 10-15 races) I have been working on getting quotes for new sails. It has also been recommended I send these sails in and maybe look into seeing if they need "a tummy tuck"(this is from one the most experienced sailors in our location). My thought on that is I would rather buy a new sail then spending 500 bucks to fix this one, and again I'm not having the weather helm issues. Although the last race we had about 10knots wind and I ran everything pretty loose (Mainsail foot, halyard and jib halyard,) I did get some luffing (more then I am use to seeing) in the front part of the main (in the luff curve area of the main) when pointing I wasn't able to trim it out with the sheet and traveler, but the tell tales flew nicely. So the main may be the issue.
As far as experience goes I have been racing in these same races for about 15 years now on a Pearson35 which I shared with my Father and weather I raced that boat, or he did, or we raced together we did always did really good( I would say 1st or 2nd most races). To top it off we always raced that boat with the dingy hanging off the davits didn't care about weight at all, just kept the bottom clean and did great, now on my new boat I am dumping water tanks leaving everything on the dock, and the Pearson sails right past me the dinghy hanging off the back. In the old Pearson per handy cap should be a slower boat, the Pearson has a 226 rating and I am 174, and the sails on that boat are the same size as mine and are at least 12 years old now (we never did any rigging tuning on that boat). So that boat is really my biggest comparison besides a few others I have sailed against for years now. I don't consider myself a great racer by any means other the other hand I also don't think I am a total novice either, but the performance I have been able to get out of this boat in these races is becoming a little discouraging, and the races I have traveled to my finishes are really quite embarrassing. I know this boat is quite a bit different then the Pearson and I am still learning it. I even bought the Northsail racing book and there are always areas where I can improve, but I didn't find anything I have been doing wrong in the book. It might be that this boat requires a lot more adjustment for conditions and is more sensitive to weight then I am use to. The other thing is I think I will probably need to start flying the spinnaker especially for broad reaching conditions, although I would really like to dial in the non spin before adding that to the equation.
I have lined up a couple people from the my race community to sail the boat with me, I might find some answers there, but in the mean while I thought I would reach out to this community and see if I can get some input, also see if anyone has had much luck sailing racing this boat. As far as a cruiser I think the boat is excellent and I think it could be a quick racer as well just thinking maybe these sails suck or I'm really screwing something up.
I know this is a lot so again thank you for your input an time.
Henry
 
Jun 2, 2007
353
Beneteau First 375 Slidell, LA
Once you take care of the obvious things like bottom condition and sail trim (make sure your genoa sheet leads are set correctly), I have found that the hardest thing to get right when racing a new boat is finding the right sailing angles upwind and downwind. That is, upwind is it better to point or foot? Do you have a regular fin keel, a shoal keel, or a wing keel? Downwind, is it better to heat up or soak down? And of course the answers to these questions vary with wind speed, but it will take some time and experimentation to get better. If you're racing non-spin, I would definitely suggest rigging a way to get the genoa sheet leads outboard to the gunwale (and a little forward) when broad reaching. I promise it will make a difference.
 
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May 1, 2019
7
oday 39 39 Morgana Jacksonville fl
I have played with the tuning some. The recommendation I have gotten is to keep the mast straight.
All I have done is just the basic setup where which you can find online. Sight up the mast for straightness or use a string. Use a halyard to measure from the top of the mast to either side of the boat to make sure the mast isn't leaning side to side. Look at the leeward shrouds when sailing side to make sure they aren't sloppy loose. After that I do have a tension gauge and have set the shrouds to the same tension, but it everything looks straight you will most likely have the same tension or be very close.
I haven't messed with raking the mast on this boat. I don't have much weather helm at all in winds under 15knots so it is probably ok . For the forestay I just I tightened the head stay so my furling wasn't sagging too much up wind. I have bent the mast but have since put it back because I don't think on this boat I would need to bend it till like 20+knots.
So that is all I have really done there are plenty of YouTube videos on that.
As far as cruising I think the boat is awesome, and it sails well, I bought it in NC brought it down to Florida and made 2 three week trips to the Bahamas the boat has been great for that. But I have been doing the club race thing for about 15years now, I think it adds a lot of fun to sailing, but since getting this boat am not doing as well as I was expecting, so I am working on that.
 
May 1, 2019
7
oday 39 39 Morgana Jacksonville fl
Sandy,
Thank you for the input. I have the shoal draft keel which is great for my area, but does hurt my upwind performance. The genoa sheet leads are kind of interesting, and is definitely something I need to play with more I feel like I have them set too far back (flattening the foot and causing some twist, but if I move them forward the sail shape doesn't right like the sail has a huge belly and cannot get it flat. Maybe the jib is stretched out, not sure.
For the outboard jib sheets, I have as you suggested tried keeping an extra set of jib sheets outboard for reaching and I think I did set it more forward, but I have only tried it only a couple of times but probably need to make that a habit. After I talked to some of the other boats in the club that I have raced against they said they have done it but most don't do it regularly because of the hassle, so I figured the change may not be enough to really make the difference, but I will work on making that a habit.
As far as wind angles for upwind I ride with the puffs and lulls to maintain always trying to maintain good speed, so I pinch up to get a better angle, when a gust hits and fall off when it subsides and with the pinch we usually see some increase in speed. Maybe I should keep the boat on a straight course and work the traveler during the gust to increase speed, I'm not sure which is the better philosophy in that scenario that is just the way I have always done it. Downwind I kind of do the opposite fall off with the gust and point in the lull, again trying to make the most speed.
 
Jun 2, 2007
353
Beneteau First 375 Slidell, LA
I'm sure you already know this, but the generally accepted way of setting the genoa lead position is to sail upwind closehauled, then slowly turn into the wind while watching the telltales. If the upper telltale breaks first, meaning the leech is too open, move the lead forward a little. If the lower breaks first, the leech is closed (which can give the appearance of too full of a sail), so move the lead back a little. Many people move the lead back a bit in strong wind to depower, or forward in very light wind to get more power at the cost of pointing ability.

Do you feel like you are losing more time upwind or downwind? There's a guy in my club who can give me fits going upwind, but has trouble keeping his speed up downwind. The outboard jib lead really helps in this situation, and you make the same adjustments with fore and aft lead position as you do upwind, watching the upper and lower telltales. Do your best to keep the leeward telltales streaming, easing the sheet out. Of course, the main should be way out - many people don't ease it enough. The trick is to keep your speed up (which brings your apparent wind forward) without steering too far away from the mark.

My apologies if I'm just telling you what you already know.
 
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May 1, 2019
7
oday 39 39 Morgana Jacksonville fl
No apologies, I appreciate the input. These are all great points, I think I have this dialed in pretty good but it gives me something to make sure double check my next time out, and this boat might not be as forgiving on trim as the old boat was.
I cannot say for sure I am having issues more upwind or down seems to be all both. It is seems to be a faster boat up wind although pointing is limited by the shoal draft, and I do see other boats that I feel shouldn't be pointing as well pointing just as high as me if not higher. I have had races where it has been one or the other though and other, for sure. But trim our trim has been getting better with each race and we do seem to be improving some, but it's been a pretty slow improvement with no big light bulb moment yet.
 
Jan 1, 2006
4,208
Marblehead Skiff 14' Greenport, NY
It sounds like you know you need a new jib. While the jib may be fine for cruising, if you can't flatten it you can't point with the fleet. At a SA/Displacement of around 215 this isn't a "Racing boat" - Especially with a winged keel. I would try footing a bit going upwind to maintain speed and never, ever let the sail plan stall trying to pinch a boat that simply can't pinch. Remember you are racing your rating not so much the other boats.
I like to cite the example of my friend who has a Seafarer 23 rating somewhere around 270. But he drives that boat like it's a part of him. He usually finishes last or close to it. Due to PHRF corrections he's got so many trophies he's run out of places to put them. The adage locally is "If you can still see xxxxx, he's beating you."
 
May 6, 2010
392
1984 Oday 39 79 Milwaukee
Henry,

Your observations about your mast are different than mine. I have tensioned my shrouds based on percentage of breaking strength and my mast has quite a bit of bend, more than the two inches you cited. To straighten the mast I would need to make the aft lowers higher tension than the forward lowers which goes against everything I thought I knew. I also feel like I could tighten the backstay more as the roller furler seems to have a bit more sag than I think it should in moderate wind. I don't want to tighten the backstay more because of the bend I already have. When I haul out in a couple weeks I think I will drop the mast and see if there is any adjustment in the forestay.
 
May 17, 2004
1,945
Beneteau Oceanis 37 LE Havre de Grace
To straighten the mast I would need to make the aft lowers higher tension than the forward lowers which goes against everything I thought I knew.
I thought it was ok to run the forward lowers at relatively low tension. I thought their main purpose was to prevent mast pumping/inversion, and a lower tension to do just that was ok.