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electric winch handle

Feb 21, 2013
3,426
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
Works very well for normal winching. I would advise NOT to put excessive load on it otherwise it will fail.
 
Apr 12, 2007
131
Hunter 420 Herrington Harbor South
I have had one (winchrite) for 10 years performs well but as sail sfbay said don't put a heave load on it. I have replaced the motor when it burned out with their new brushless motor and it continues to function. very expensive and heavy. in one of these forms someone mentioned an cordless impact drill as an alternative. Purchased one and am extremally satisfied with it. Much lighter, faster, reversible, 1/3 the cost and not as finicky as the WinchRite. Also functions as a drill;). recommend you look in to one of those. I have been using it for 3 years GREAT results.
 
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Likes: Dave c30
Nov 21, 2019
21
Catalina C30 4200 Muskegon, Michigan
are thoughs two speed winches?
if not, does it work well?
I have to haul a main sail up a 42ft mast
 
Feb 21, 2013
3,426
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
From WinchRite: This electric winch handle works on all single and two speed winches where a standard eight-point handle is utilized. It features a chimed soft start speed acceleration and a sealed circuit board. Operate the WinchRite handle at the lowest speed of your winch to ensure maximum pull and lowest battery consumption. 0-130 RPM via Variable Speed Technology in Both Directions Allowing for Two-Speed Winch Rotations.

Just do not strain it. If the halyard gets stuck winching it up the mast then stop and re-assess what you doing.
 
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Likes: Dave c30
Sep 20, 2014
1,273
Rob Legg RL24 Chain O'Lakes
I would second the notion of using a cordless drill. I use one on my swing keel. It works very well. Much faster and easier than a hand crank. I can't imagine what the benifit would for an electric winch handle over a cordless drill, especially with the newest brushless dc motors. They will go slow and have tons of torque.
 
Jan 22, 2008
757
Hunter 340 Baytown TX
are thoughs two speed winches?
if not, does it work well?
I have to haul a main sail up a 42ft mast
The "P" (luff) on my main is 44', mast is 56' above the water, two top full battens. Two speed winch, watch this video. You can hear and see it slow down when the reef line start dragging and it's hauling them through the luff and leach grommets, and really drags when it reaches the second reef line. You can see the reef lines running on the cabin top while the main is going up. Even the slightest drag on the reef lines just about stops the main from going up, even using a winch handle, that's why I keep messing with them while I'm raising the main.
I did use a Makita 18v for several years till the batteries wore out, it had no problem raising the main. The right angle drill is easier to hold and get leverage.
 
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Likes: pumpkinpie
Mar 20, 2011
587
Hunter 31_83-87 New Orleans
Bill, can you send a pic of the cracker bit? I don’t think I’ve ever seen one or if I did, then didn’t recognize its “dual” purpose. Thanks, Jerry
 
Oct 22, 2014
15,719
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
I have to haul a main sail up a 42ft mast
Dave. I would examine the sail slugs/slides, the mast track and the halyards/sheaves before I bought an electric winch handle.
On a 42 foot mast with a sail for a 30 foot boat you should be able to haul the sail up manually if everything is working correctly. The only reason to winch a sail up is to overcome sail weight or friction in the system. You should correct the friction first before adding power. Friction combatted with power will eventually break something.

I am no longer a 30 something, but I can raise and lower my sails by hauling down on the halyards while feeding the sails into the tracks. I put the sail halyard around a winch only to get the last 4 inches of line stretch and the correct tightness trim in the sail. My boat carries 252 sqft of main sail while the Catalina 30 carries 201 sq feet.

I would look at your system before powering it up.
 
Nov 21, 2019
21
Catalina C30 4200 Muskegon, Michigan
Dave. I would examine the sail slugs/slides, the mast track and the halyards/sheaves before I bought an electric winch handle.
I have a tall rig, little more sail... but I also have a bad shoulder. I can get the main up, but I get sore and more sore as I go past 1/2 way up. the last two feet are the worst. I've been told to get an electric wrench handle for this. mostly it's my wife and I going out and shes as old and less power in her arms. we've had the sail track and sail guides checked and they are ok. dont want to spray anything in the track as it will undoubtedly get on the sail.
 
Oct 22, 2014
15,719
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Shoulder pain is no joke or pleasure. If getting mechanical help is the way help you go sailing by all means go for it.

I wanted to offer additional ideas that helped me and might work for you.

When I first raised my new mainsail, the sailmaker was at the boat and he sprayed the track and the sail slides with How to Apply SailKote on Equipment, Sails & Hulls - McLube SailKote. Worked like a charm.

When I had the mast down I cleaned the track using SailKote.

It makes the track and slides move without effort.

I can let the Halyard go and the sail comes down on it's own. I would encourage it's use to "ease your pain".

Secondly there are ways to pull a sail that do not require a lot of strength. I run a halyard, on boats with a stubborn sail, around a cleat on the mast. Holdin the halyard tail in one hand, grab the halyard running along the mast with the other hand and lean back like I was pulling on a banjo string. Take up the slack around the cleat and repeat. This will raise a stubborn sail and with little effort.

Another hoist technique, observed, by youthful sailors is to grab the halyard about eye height and holding on, squat or sit down while watching the sail go up. Move hands up the halyard while Standing up and repeat. Body weight is doing the pulling not the arms.

Enjoy those beautiful waters off the shores of Michigan. Lived in the St Joseph area for a while and found it a great place to live and play.
 

RussC

.
Sep 11, 2015
1,520
Merit 22- Oregon lakes
Who pays that kind of money for such a simple drill motor adaptor :yikes: . are they gold plated platinum or what? 10 minutes with a lathe or buy a Universal brand weedwhacker head arbor bolt and file/grind/sand 1MM off the 4 flats (19MM needs to be 17 across the flats). $8.00 new at a greedy lawn/garden supply dealer or .50 from the same dealers scrap pile.
ARBOR BOLT 10MMX1.25MM LHF HUSQVARNA
 
Nov 21, 2019
21
Catalina C30 4200 Muskegon, Michigan
Shoulder pain is no joke or pleasure. If getting mechanical help is the way help you go sailing by all means go for it.

I wanted to offer additional ideas that helped me and might work for you.

When I first raised my new mainsail, the sailmaker was at the boat and he sprayed the track and the sail slides with How to Apply SailKote on Equipment, Sails & Hulls - McLube SailKote. Worked like a charm.

When I had the mast down I cleaned the track using SailKote.

It makes the track and slides move without effort.

I can let the Halyard go and the sail comes down on it's own. I would encourage it's use to "ease your pain".

Secondly there are ways to pull a sail that do not require a lot of strength. I run a halyard, on boats with a stubborn sail, around a cleat on the mast. Holdin the halyard tail in one hand, grab the halyard running along the mast with the other hand and lean back like I was pulling on a banjo string. Take up the slack around the cleat and repeat. This will raise a stubborn sail and with little effort.

Another hoist technique, observed, by youthful sailors is to grab the halyard about eye height and holding on, squat or sit down while watching the sail go up. Move hands up the halyard while Standing up and repeat. Body weight is doing the pulling not the arms.

Enjoy those beautiful waters off the shores of Michigan. Lived in the St Joseph area for a while and found it a great place to live and play.
thanks for the advise, I now have a lot to think about. I will look into the sail kote. the sail foes come down easy. there Doyle sails about 4 yrs old with all reefs and batons. the previous owner died soon after they were put on the boat and I have it now. the sails were inspected and found to be like new. I suspect this is one reason for the stiffness. my son in law has no trouble bringing it up though. the halyard is brought back to the cockpit and pulleys in at the bottom of the mast so banjo effect is not an option. my winch at the top of the cockpit is a single speed which doesn't help. the two speed winches are at the sides and farther back, I use them to trim the 150 jenoa. I have all halyards and sheets changes out last season to avoid the swells in the rope. cranker seems a better option tho I will try sail coat first when I get ready to take it off the hard. I actually live closer to st joe and had a chance to slip there, but was scarred off by the 3 bridges and the fast current on the river. we have also been getting a lot of Chicago people slipping there to avoid the high prices of slip in there area. I decided on Muskegan as there are no bridges and a deep water lake to sail in if the big lake is to rough.
thanks again.
 
Oct 22, 2014
15,719
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
the halyard is brought back to the cockpit and pulleys in at the bottom of the mast
I must confess. I am an old school kind of sailor. I have always done my sail management at the mast. There are lots of opinions and rational about safety and convenience with having the lines run to the cockpit. One thing not questioned, turning the halyards and running them to the cockpit and through clutches will add friction to the lines, making them more difficult to pull.

Not saying you should go to the mast, but you will need to check the leads of the lines to be sure they are fair and as little friction is added. You will need to do regular maintenance on the turning blocks and sheaves to assure they minimize friction to the lines. If your lines exit the mast above the base, when needed the lines can be assisted by a person at the mast pulling the line and then in the cockpit taking up the slack.

Fair winds and smooth sailing.