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Ceramic coatings anyone?

Mar 26, 2011
2,695
Corsair F-24 MK I Deale, MD
It’s was around $4000, which included wet sanding and buffing every square inch of the 30 year old deck and three hulls. It took him days to sand, compound and polish the boat. Applying the ceramic coating and buffing it out was only a small fraction of the labor cost.
Thanks.

And wow. Perhaps 16% of the value of the boat. New sails, a couple of motors, or three years of slip fees. And then after 3 years a partial repeat. I am not questioning the work involved. I've considered compounding my boat but lost interest upon realizing how many corners an F-24 has. You could probably compound a 40-foot mono in the same time.

I'm not seeing it, but I'm not interested in shiny.
 
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Likes: DrJudyB
Jun 25, 2004
1,087
Corsair F24 Mk1 003 San Francisco Bay, CA
Perhaps 16% of the value of the boat


I didn't pay much for the boat. It was $8k-$10k less than other F24's with better cosmetics and mediocre sails. I fixed the cosmetics and put 5 high-end sails on the boat. Other than cosmetics and sails, the boat. trailer and outboard were in very good condition, with most maintenance up to date. Lots of new parts on the boat.
 
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Likes: Will Gilmore
Jul 23, 2020
20
Thanks.

And wow. Perhaps 16% of the value of the boat. New sails, a couple of motors, or three years of slip fees. And then after 3 years a partial repeat. I am not questioning the work involved. I've considered compounding my boat but lost interest upon realizing how many corners an F-24 has. You could probably compound a 40-foot mono in the same time.

I'm not seeing it, but I'm not interested in shiny.
There are three types of sailboat people:

Trust fund brats

Those who work in the industry and price gouge others for sailboat-related items or services (they feed off those mentioned above).

...and the rest of us.

"The rest of us" wax our own boats and buy the supplies from Walmart instead of West Marine. We are the types who sew our own cushions, scrape our own bottoms, repair our own sails, and install our own solar panels. We are self-reliant, and if the apocalypse should happen and wipe out most of humanity, you'll still find us bobbing up and down on the ocean in our boats like so many radiation-resistant cockroaches.

*This is hyperbole for humor. Not trying to denigrate people who don't have to worry about price when having things done on their boat (good for them), or those who provide these services (they have to pay for their boats too).
 
Jun 25, 2004
1,087
Corsair F24 Mk1 003 San Francisco Bay, CA
There are three types of sailboat people:

Trust fund brats

Those who work in the industry and price gouge others for sailboat-related items or services (they feed off those mentioned above).

...and the rest of us.

"The rest of us" wax our own boats and buy the supplies from Walmart instead of West Marine. We are the types who sew our own cushions, scrape our own bottoms, repair our own sails, and install our own solar panels. We are self-reliant, and if the apocalypse should happen and wipe out most of humanity, you'll still find us bobbing up and down on the ocean in our boats like so many radiation-resistant cockroaches.

*This is hyperbole for humor. Not trying to denigrate people who don't have to worry about price when having things done on their boat (good for them), or those who provide these services (they have to pay for their boats too).
Michael, that's not funny. It's offensive to people like me.
I work in the marine trades and I don't find your humor funny. I don't price gouge. I provide a service to sailors.
 
Jul 23, 2020
20
Michael, that's not funny. It's offensive to people like me.
I work in the marine trades and I don't find your humor funny. I don't price gouge. I provide a service to sailors.
I'm sorry you're offended. Where I was raised sailors prefer dysphemisms to euphemisms, and nobody gets offended (and it's often those making these types of quips who are the ones who own some sort of sailboat-related business). To be quite honest, people who speak in euphemistic language and who are easily offended are looked on with suspicion.
 
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Jul 1, 2010
775
Seaward 25, Catalina 350 Erie, Pa
I'm a buff and wax kinda guy but always open to new ideas. Our 96 Seaward was Poliglow coated by its previous owner. I stripped that off, wet sanded, buffed and polished it. Always had it looking like a brand new boat year after year, but had to buff it every couple of years as the blue gel coat stripe especially would oxidize under the wax (no matter the brand).

2 years ago tried an experiment on the transom only. Prepped it as you would for applying Poliglow, and applied 6 or 8 light coats of Zep acrylic floor wax using a Poliglow brand microfiber mitt. Came out great. A quick buff after with a fine polishing compound (Presta Chroma) and it was indestinnguishable from a buffed and waxed hull. Poliglow's claim to fame is that it has has uv protection and floor wax shouldn't, but I've noticed no oxidation under the wax. it's held up great, and I did the rest of the hull the same way last year. I like the idea that I'm now adding the shine to the fiberglass rather than mechanically abrading it each year to shine it.

Our other boat has a real nice condition gel coat that only has needed a cleaner wax application followed by a final wax coat each season. My go to "wax" is a polymer wax (Starbrite). I've found it lasts longer than my old favorite (Collinite paste wax) and is easier to apply.

Since I do all my own work, no way would I pay the big bucks for someone else to do this kind of work. I could be convinced to try one of the "ceramic" coatings (doing it myself) if it really is a better mouse trap, but no shine on a boat lasts without maintenance, and wax (and acrylic wax) is lots cheaper for likely the same results.
 
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Jun 25, 2004
1,087
Corsair F24 Mk1 003 San Francisco Bay, CA
@Michael Anthony
Dysphemism is the substitution of a disagreeable, offensive, or disparaging expression for an agreeable or inoffensive one, or a neutral one, according to the dictionary. I think it's better to choose respectful terms when possible, especially online.

Please don't speak disrespectfully of people in the marine trades and services in the Forums ... Or else I'm gonna have to call your Mama. ;)
 
Jul 23, 2020
20
Dysphemism the substitution of a disagreeable, offensive, or disparaging expression for an agreeable or inoffensive one, or a neutral one, according to the dictionary. I think it's better to choose respectful terms when possible, especially online.

Please don't speak disrespectfully of people in the marine trades and services in the Forums ... Or else I'm gonna have to call your Mama. ;)
I have an English degree so I'm happy to discuss the nuance here:

An example of a euphemism:

"My Aunt so-and-so recently passed away. She had a good life."

An example of a dysphemism:

"My Aunt so-and-so just kicked the bucket. She had a hard life, but she was a tough old broad."

Where I come from, sailors (and people in general) prefer the second example because it's considered a more honest way to communicate. People who speak in euphemisms are looked on with suspicion because it seems as if they're trying to sell you something (or like the politician who wants to convince you you aren't about to get screwed in the wrong hole without lubrication).

But again, I apologize if you were offended.
 
May 25, 2012
3,095
john alden caravelle 42 sturgeon bay, wis
michael, Dr. judy is the most knowledgable sailor on this web sight. she shares her wisdom all the time so we can all learn. she is always polite and kind to us all. she has taught us all many things about these toys we all enjoy. she can converse at any level of skill about our toys. she answers questions, big and small. she is a GEM!

you better send her some roses and candies dude
just saying
 
Mar 26, 2011
2,695
Corsair F-24 MK I Deale, MD
Type 4: People who believe their work is valuable and any craft they don't understand should be cheap.

I'm not interested in buffing because I don't value shine, not because I don't respect the work or understand the pricing. It's just not my thing.

I do value systems that are reliable and efficient, and that is what I focus on. I test gear. Some marine stuff is priced high because it is a small market, because of inefficiencies in distribution, or because we pay for convenience (7-11 is more expensive than Aldi). In MANY cases the Home Depot stuff is not of the same quality. Fasteners are 304 SS. The rope and paint and shackles are lower grade. In the case of disposable brushes, maybe it doesn't matter.

In the case of boatyard labor, the business model is a problem. The work is not year round. You're expected to go to the boat and work around weather. Boats tend to be custom, each with it's own history of hidden problems. Work tends to be custom and thus requires a lot of thinking and fiddling, even for and expereinced craftsman. It's different than taking a mass produced car to the shop, where they can estimate the work from a shop rate manual. Different.
 
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Likes: DrJudyB
Jan 1, 2006
5,288
Slickcraft 26 Greenport, NY
I've always thought that boatyards would do more business if they were more transparent about pricing. Most people don't like open ended project costs, unless you have enough money to not care. And, a lot of people with that much money are often the worst about costs. Boatyards and marine service people do enough jobs to be able to price reasonably accurately. Prep a bottom? XXX Dollars - based on past jobs. If they can't do that without a bunch CYA jibberish I might conclude that they don't know their business. A lot of boat owners defer jobs that aren't critical, or DIY, because they couldn't get a straight answer about what it costs.
 
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Likes: DrJudyB
Jul 1, 2010
775
Seaward 25, Catalina 350 Erie, Pa
I do almost all my own boat work and it's all open ended. Project creep is a real issue with boat's. I used to work in cars for a living, and as mentioned above, it isn't the same thing. I guess I've been real lucky, in that the few times I've hired out work on my boats I've gotten excellent service and a fair price. I never got any hard estimates before hand, though.
 
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Likes: DrJudyB
Feb 17, 2006
4,942
Lancer 27PS MCB Camp Pendleton KF6BL
Well, guys, looks like we have digressed. Might I recommend we go back to the OT? Else if I see this moving towards a "one-on-one" I might be inclined to close the topic.

And I agree, Dr. Judy has a stellar reputation here on SBO.
 

Rick D

.
Jun 14, 2008
6,914
Hunter Legend 40.5 Shoreline Marina Long Beach CA
I am a skeptic until I talk to a body shop painter. I remember some miracle polishes decades ago that were nearly impossible to repaint when needed. I just had our 2020 waxed for the first time. I called out carnuba wax until I know better.