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C50 chainplates - Anyone tackled these?

Discussion in 'Big Boats' started by SVBOB, Feb 5, 2017. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. SVBOB

    SVBOB

    Joined Nov 4, 2013
    8 posts, 0 likes
    Catalina 50
    US SITKA
    Hi all.
    Mine is a 1992 Catalina Morgan 50. Two of the six chainplates are in need of replacement. Before I get to ripping out cabinets and sinks, is there anyone out there that tackled theirs? Looking for some photos, diagrams or other info to help guide the work. They are embedded in fiberglass with only the top exposed. Here's a photo. They are ugly, I know.
     

    Attached Files:



  2. Stu Jackson

    Stu Jackson

    Joined Feb 26, 2004
    19,187 posts, 295 likes
    Catalina 34
    US C34 San Francisco
    Bob,

    I've been following you for years via Mainsheet. Sorry to hear about your issue.

    You should, first, call Gerry Douglas at Catalina Yachts.

    My friend, Al Watson, bought a Mason 43 after he sold his Catalina 34. He might be able to help. Try here: http://kindred-spirit.net/index2.html

    All the best, good luck.
     


  3. SVBOB

    SVBOB

    Joined Nov 4, 2013
    8 posts, 0 likes
    Catalina 50
    US SITKA
    Thank you Stu. Sympathy is definitely appreciated. I have a helper tracking down Gerry. Thank you.
     


  4. CloudDiver

    CloudDiver

    Joined Sep 8, 2014
    2,159 posts, 229 likes
    Catalina 22 Swing Keel
    US San Diego San Diego
    Holy Schnikes... Did they use mild steel on those? Wow... Probably 304, but what gets me is how they could have gotten wet to rust that bad if they are bedded in glass. (I have an idea, see below)
    Luckily (there is some light at the end of the tunnel), my guess is that they are very simple design. They look like straight 1/4" thick flat stock that are set into the deck, then the support rods pin below deck rather than a complex shape that bolts in numerous places to a structural member. Genius really... other than cutting the old ones out, they should be easy to fabricate.
    I would say judging my the looks of that one, you really do need to get into the cabinets, clean everything out, and get ready to replace them all. Only carefully remove what you absolutely have to, hopefully nothing needs be 'ripped' out.
    All the rigging needs to be de-tensioned, boom comes off, etc. Will your keel stepped mast stand freely and safely without rigging attached (fore and back stay can stay on, just no tension)?
    Post some pic of the chain plates on deck if you can. My guess is that because they set them in glass, the tension and lateral forces on the rigging eventually flexed them allowing water to creep in. When re-done, the old ones are pulled and everything cleaned up, the old slots filled with epoxy, then a plunge router used to create new slots. The new plates are installed using a bedding compound that allows for elongation or compression preventing future leaks.
    If I could get my hands on the original drawings I could give you a fair quote on what it would cost to have new ones made.
     


  5. SVBOB

    SVBOB

    Joined Nov 4, 2013
    8 posts, 0 likes
    Catalina 50
    US SITKA
    Thanks for the offer and thoughts. They are located under a sink with little ventilation, and I agree the metal choice was poor. Still looking for drawings.
     


  6. Stu Jackson

    Stu Jackson

    Joined Feb 26, 2004
    19,187 posts, 295 likes
    Catalina 34
    US C34 San Francisco
    Bob,
    We have a lot of knowledgeable skippers who may be able to help.

    Try www.c34.org,. Click on forums register for free and ask. Many of our systems are similar and we have many contacts.
     


  7. Stu Jackson

    Stu Jackson

    Joined Feb 26, 2004
    19,187 posts, 295 likes
    Catalina 34
    US C34 San Francisco
    Bob, I just got back to my computer, thumb typing ain't my style. :)

    Try this, it may not be identical, but close. Yours seem to be embedded, but once you work around it, most CY are similar. You should be able to get some fabricated locally, it's just bar stock with holes. I don't know how yours connect to the rods down below that connect to the hull.

    Chainplate Rebedding 101 - with Bed It with Butyl from Maine Sail

    http://c34.org/bbs/index.php/topic,7265.msg49430.html#msg49430
     


  8. SVBOB

    SVBOB

    Joined Nov 4, 2013
    8 posts, 0 likes
    Catalina 50
    US SITKA
    Thanks all. I love Butyl tape. I use it on my old boat's chainplates. Great stuff. And I will apply it when I pull the top plates. That said, the chainplates are not showing leaking at the deck surface. The moisture appears to be because they are under a cabin sink without enough ventilation (the sewer hoses are also under there) and any water or moisture there pools at them. I am still seeking advice from anyone who either cut them out or reinforced them.
     


  9. SVBOB

    SVBOB

    Joined Nov 4, 2013
    8 posts, 0 likes
    Catalina 50
    US SITKA
     

    Attached Files:



  10. SVBOB

    SVBOB

    Joined Nov 4, 2013
    8 posts, 0 likes
    Catalina 50
    US SITKA
    I attached a drawing of the original design sent to me by Gerry Douglas at Catalina Yachts. They were made from galvanized steel(!). For prosperity here they are. Chainplates Catalina Morgan 50:
     

    Attached Files:



  11. CloudDiver

    CloudDiver

    Joined Sep 8, 2014
    2,159 posts, 229 likes
    Catalina 22 Swing Keel
    US San Diego San Diego
    I just printed the drawings and had a look... They are helpful, but don't tell the whole story;
    - the picture you attached at the top, that must be where the support rod attached to the bottom, correct?
    - what do the chainplates look like up on deck from above, and what do they look like inside but above where the rod attaches? I'm keeping my fingers crossed that they make this out of stainless.

    The main Chainplate bottom supports (the part on page 3) is what was made of mild steel angle and then galvanized, which I believe is the part that has rusted out. It would be easy to make a new one in terms of fabrication, the hard part is installing it.
    Its one solid piece that is under the grid structure and the tabs protrude through slots where the bottom of the tie rod connects.
    - To get it out, did they glass it in (probably), or just use adhesive or what... big question.
    - To get it back in, is there even access to that area and how much stuff is in the way?

    Making the new part isn't complicated at all, it's getting it installed that could be a real bear. This would for sure be a rig down job, plus a good amount of the interior might need to be disassembled to have access.
    The new supports could be made of stainless steel, but the material is 1/2" thick. It will be expensive for the material and a royal pain to cut. My plasma cutter will do mild steel that thick, but not stainless. I have to buy the bigger unit to do that. That's probably why they used mild steel back then, they didn't have plasma cutters.
    Another option would be to make composite replacements with G10 board and glass it in from below. Believe it or not I think it would actually cheaper, less labor in fabrication. Big question still is, how to get the whole thing in place under the grid structure and glass it in.

    Can you take some more pictures? Take a shot of the chainplates from the deck, and then also looking up to the deck connection from the inside. Then, can you get below the grid and see underneath where those tabs come up through the deck? If you need to, you might want to get a camera on a snake that attaches to iPhone or android phone. They are pretty cheap on Amazon. Getting one myself soon. I wish I lived nearby, I'd love to crawl around in there myself to help you figure this out, I love a good challenge!
     



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