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Windlass install

Oct 22, 2014
13,057
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
I suggested the horizontal windlass as a possibility. It might be great if it fits the space just at the front of your locker. That is where you show the deepest fall, 12 inches. You will be drawing in mostly nylon rode which you can flake to the side as it comes in. When you get to chain you can let it drop off the windlass and lay in the anchor locker as it does now, assuming the windlass can be located on the front of your locker. Engineering wise you will need to put strength to support the windlass there. It may be cramped. But that location might be best to let the chain fall. Note you are likely anchoring in 20 ft or less With little or no tidal change for 24 hours. And then only lake rise or fall. Less than 1 ft. you said you have 30 ft chain. The chain will be right over the anchor as you recover the last 30ft.

Really the question is can you fit a windlass there and still accommodate the chain lock You currently have. Tight but from the images it looks like it might fit.

A horizontal windlass keeps everything on the top of the deck. This protects your v-berth. You just run wires as you run the hose for the pump out to the front of the boat. Lastly the gypsy can be on the right side, also matching up with the space limits in your anchor locker.

If this sounds of interest I’ll see it I can do a rough sketch. I’m away from my comp system till next week. Or maybe one of the brilliant engineers can capture this idea and give it shape.

This idea would require a bit of alterations to the anchor locker cover to accommodate the windlass.
 

vmaks

.
May 31, 2012
70
Oday 28 Suttons Bay
Thank you for your very in-depth reply and suggestions. I will read your reply a few more times to absorb and try to visualize.
So, the reason I am looking into this now is so I have a handful of ideas to throw back at the yard guy when the haul-out season subsides and we start the debate if this can be done for a reasonable price. I don't want to take his word as golden,I want to intrigue him to outsmart me and accomplish this task. Just cuz it has not been done doesn't mean it can't be done reasonably easy. I actually asked him if he was capable or if I should look elsewhere,politely. This guy is part of a biggish yard in a smallish town,he has been doing this awhile. They did some work on my old O'Day that I was very impressed with.
It would be great if you could,upon your offer, when your schedule lightens up, to do a rough sketch on paper,take a pic and post it for me. I am actually more of a visual learner than auditory. In the meantime, I will get on YouTube and note the differences in the way horizontal vs vertical windlasses bring in the rode.
 
Jan 4, 2006
3,087
Hunter 310 West Vancouver, B.C.
It might be great if it fits the space just at the front of your locker.
My thoughts initially with the greater drop but it's going to be crowded up front. There may be the possibility of mounting it close to the aft edge at the front of the locker but this will rely on the dimensions of the windlass and the available deck space. Reinforcing of the deck could be done by running connectors to the hull. This could be the solution "IF" the unit will sit on the forward deck.


Note you are likely anchoring in 20 ft or less With little or no tidal change for 24 hours. And then only lake rise or fall.
Where did this come from ? Nobody tells me nuttin':mad:. I thought this would be the usual coastal anchoring where you've got to be prepared for any depth. If that IS the case, maybe an opportunity to reduce some rode and make more space.

,he has been doing this awhile. They did some work on my old O'Day that I was very impressed with.
Congratulations ! Sounds like you've found one of the good 25 percenters.
 
Jan 4, 2006
3,087
Hunter 310 West Vancouver, B.C.
@vmaks you can check the layout of the windlass by selecting the windlass of your choice and then using a drawing app to lay it on a plan photo of your front deck. If you don't have a good plan photo, use the third photo you posted and foreshorten all your dimensions of the windlass. Call your guy and get the fore/aft dimension of the foreward deck and you've got everything you need to lay it out.
 
Oct 22, 2014
13,057
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Where did this come from ? Nobody tells me nuttin':mad:.
Ralph. VMAKS says her location is Suttons Bay. Suttons Bay is in Michigan. She is preparing for winter. Another piece of info for a sleuth in waiting.... :biggrin:

Certainly the Great Lakes has lots of deep water, but a lot of the coastal anchorages are not deep like our PacificNW waters.
 

vmaks

.
May 31, 2012
70
Oday 28 Suttons Bay
Yes, indeed, although we can get into 300'+ depth of water quickly, our anchorages are generally 20' deep and we have no tides worth mentioning. We do have seiches, those are wind driven. I know I already mentioned this info,perhaps other's can not see those responses?? Also, tho we can get some mighty Northwesterlies (aka it did the Edmund Fitzgerald in), long and might fetches from Chicago with Southwesterlies, 8-10' waves, you would never see me anchor out in that stuff. I would tuck my tail and find a harbor or a lee side of an island. My endeavor to put on a windlass is purely selfish from a safety standpoint (Great Lakes storms come up quick and fierce and without warning. Our water is frigid cold) and to entice me to get out an anchor more cuz I wouldn't have to dread the yanking of the anchor as night falls cuz a charter boat just dropped anchor nxt to me when I was the only one originally in the bay. If I can't make it work I will attach a tag line where the rode meets chain, attach it 10' up the rode and use it with a deck winch once the chain meets the bow roller. I am determined to NOT use brut force anymore.
 
Jan 4, 2006
3,087
Hunter 310 West Vancouver, B.C.
VMAKS says her location is Suttons Bay. Suttons Bay is in Michigan.
I stand informed.

I am determined to NOT use brut force anymore.
I don't think it will be necessary. I think the hor. windlass on the fore deck is your best possibility. Pick out the best hor. windlass and check it for size using the method I outlined. Commonly used for approximating sizes in mechanical layouts.
 
Jul 27, 2011
4,029
Bavaria 38E Alamitos Bay
Yes, indeed, although we can get into 300'+ depth of water quickly, our anchorages are generally 20' deep and we have no tides worth mentioning. We do have seiches, those are wind driven. I know I already mentioned this info,perhaps other's can not see those responses?? Also, tho we can get some mighty Northwesterlies (aka it did the Edmund Fitzgerald in), long and might fetches from Chicago with Southwesterlies, 8-10' waves, you would never see me anchor out in that stuff. I would tuck my tail and find a harbor or a lee side of an island. My endeavor to put on a windlass is purely selfish from a safety standpoint (Great Lakes storms come up quick and fierce and without warning. Our water is frigid cold) and to entice me to get out an anchor more cuz I wouldn't have to dread the yanking of the anchor as night falls cuz a charter boat just dropped anchor nxt to me when I was the only one originally in the bay. If I can't make it work I will attach a tag line where the rode meets chain, attach it 10' up the rode and use it with a deck winch once the chain meets the bow roller. I am determined to NOT use brut force anymore.
Are you saying “brute force” as being necessary to haul the anchor chain + anchor only, or does it include the force needed to break out the anchor as well? You being experienced in anchoring, I assume it does not. But your comment above of “yanking” suggests a break-out force.

As you know, every step in an “operation“ adds time. But, how long is your leader chain? Not to dispute your wishes, but a light (aluminum) anchor such as a Fortress, and minimal chain, say 15’, might be considered a viable alternative if all else fails. Use the boat itself for the break-out. An FX-11 Fortress weighs 7-8 lb; 15 ft of 1/4” chain adds maybe another 8 lb. If 5/16” chain, then maybe 14 lb. So, 22 lb to heave up, initially, after coming up short and breaking out. The part that hurts most is the “dead lift” off the bottom-the weight of rode plus anchor vertical from the deck to the bottom. Minimize that. Still there’s manual effort, but perhaps not as much. Wear rubber gloves.

Also, with shorter leader chain, e.g., less than the water depth, and if there is a winch at your mast, you might run the nylon rode to the mast winch and crank from there to better observe. You might also pull the boat up to the anchor that way if you wish to avoid that “brute force“ step. You would not have to stop until nearly all of the chain is up. I did this occasionally on my Pearson 30. My issue was, however, that the axis of the winch drum was not on a fair lead to the bow roller. So, some effort to get and keep the rode on the winch, etc. A ready made pennant w/snatch block to make it fair could be set up ahead of time.
 
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Oct 22, 2014
13,057
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Hi @vmaks, Getting back to you.
As was said you will need to decide on the manufacturer and the size of the windlass you want. Practical Sailor magazine had some good articles on selection and comparison of various windlasses. It might be a place to start.

I looked at one of the smallest manufactured by Lewmar. The HX1.

I was looking at the foot print to get an idea of size and fit on your deck. It is 268cm by 224 cm in size. That is about 10.5" by 8.75".
Here is the info about the foot print and the design of the windlass. Note this is a Great Britain document so the dimensions are metric.
Lewmar Windlass 3.JPG

Lewmar Windlass 2.JPG

Also there is an image of limits when considering the location and install.
Lewmar Windlass 1.JPG
Attention to the recommended thickness of the plate to put the windlass on. Also the graphic about the fall for the chain. This suggests the windlass needs to be near the front of the anchor locker. The chain falls through the rectangular hole located under the chain gypsy.

Take piece of 8.5 by 11 sheet of paper and lay it on your deck. The paper is about the size of the windlass. Move it around to see if it will fit.

That will give you a good idea if the windlass will fit on your boat.