V berth plywood in O’Day 20

Nov 4, 2021
3
O'Day 20 Not sure at this point
Hi. Just recently acquired a 1974 O’Day 20 that needs some interior work. The v berth plywood appears to original but is seriously degraded and needs to be replaced. There are screws down the middle of the plywood pieces. However, the plywood doesn’t appear to be screwed where it meets the hull. It looks it might be secured to the hull with epoxy.
I am worried that just “yarding” on these will damage the interior hull surface.
I would love to hear from folks who know more than I do on this.
Thanks,
Randy
 

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Oct 22, 2014
16,443
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Nice images.
Not being able to inspect here is a possible idea. You will need to see if it will work for you.

What if you cut out the plywood about an inch or two off the hull. This would leave a strip of the plywood around the edge. You could use it as a ledger to install a plywood V- berth over the area. You can also attach the new berth plywood to the hull it would be very secure. The one downside would be the V-berth would be about 3/4inch less high.
 
Nov 4, 2021
3
O'Day 20 Not sure at this point
The plywood has better integrity toward the hull so this may be a good option for me. Thank you for your good thinking on this.
Randy
 
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Sep 29, 2015
93
Oday 222 Lake N ockamixon, pa
Do not cut the plywood to fit against the hull. You will create a hard spot and damage the hull. The connection is flexible with the joint being connected with fiberglass tape, connecting the hull to the bunk with a 1/4 inch gap. John has a solution. Another would be to remove the existing fiberglass tape with a Dremel and carbide blade. Replace the bunk with new wood and attaching it with fiberglass tape as mentioned above. Have fun!
 
Nov 4, 2021
3
O'Day 20 Not sure at this point
Hi. Let me make sure I am understanding this. If I remove the existing fiberglass, I should attach the new v-berth plywood to the hull by using fiberglass tape and epoxy. I should leave a 1/4 inch gap so that it doesn’t create a hard spot on the hull.
Did I get that right?
Thanks,
Randy
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,443
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Randy.
Hard spots occur when you force pieces against the hull i.e. a bulkhead.
If you fit the V-berth board to the hull and do not put any pressure against the hull it will be like putting on a compression sock just the correct size meaning no compression. If you have to force the V-Berth down into place then you will be putting pressure on the hull and you will form a hard spot.

Your V berth boars should sit down on a frame underneath and then you can tab the edges in place, this fibergass and epoxy.

Andy at Boatworks Today talks about what causes hard spots, after he shows you how to attach side supports (called knees) to the side of his boat.