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Unobtainable fairlead?

Feb 20, 2011
7,793
Island Packet 35 Tucson, AZ/San Carlos, MX
I've a stanchion-mount block on the pulpit that routes the furler control line. From the photos, you may be able to see that the line doesn't ride on the sheave.

20180128_080148.jpg 20180128_080546.jpg

What I'd like to put here is a fairlead of this type, but with the ability to overcome the pulpit's control of the AOA of the fairlead.

https://shop.sailboatowners.com/prod.php?13920

Has anyone seen a fairlead that has a swiveling/rotating hole for the control line to pass through, allowing less deflection, or would I have to engineer something?
 

Gunni

.
Mar 16, 2010
5,937
Beneteau 411 Oceanis Annapolis
The angle between that fair lead and the furling drum is precise in order to assure proper furling. It is the most important fair lead in the system. Looks like someone swapped out the OEM with that swivel block. The SBO fair lead looks like the original.
 
Feb 20, 2011
7,793
Island Packet 35 Tucson, AZ/San Carlos, MX
The SBO fair lead looks like the original.
But when mounted on the pulpit, the SBO fairlead may deflect the control line's passage parallel to the pulpit rail angle. That's what I'm overthinking about here. :biggrin:
Could be that the hole in the SBO product is large enough for the smallish (3/8ths?) control line to live with the deflection.
 
Aug 3, 2012
2,542
Performance Cruising Telstar 28 302 Watkins Glen
Are you sure you need a block or fairlead there? It is not turning the line or even assuring it is lead fair. It may be keeping from fouling on other things. I would replace it with a stanchion mounted bullseye.
I like the ring idea too!
 
Feb 20, 2011
7,793
Island Packet 35 Tucson, AZ/San Carlos, MX
Three thoughts.

Try rotating the block forward. This may allow the line to ride on the sheave and not change the lead angle.
Looks like the bearings in the block are shot, crumbling out as I rotate the sheave. And I'd like to scavenge the U bolt to replace the one I broke a couple days ago. :doh:

Add a block or fairlead on the horizontal bar, again attending to the lead angle.
I think that will lay the line onto the pulpit, depending on the reach of the fairlead.

Use a low friction lead like this: Antal Low Friction Ring - 14 mm and secure it with a dynama loop. Ronstan Dyneema Link 70 Series
A definite possibility. Thanks to both of you guys.
 
Aug 3, 2012
2,542
Performance Cruising Telstar 28 302 Watkins Glen
Bullseye! That's the term I couldn't come up with. But I'd like one that'll articulate, if such is out there.
Why does it need to articulate? If it leads fair, shouldn’t it stay that way? What force is going to cause it to move?
 
Feb 20, 2011
7,793
Island Packet 35 Tucson, AZ/San Carlos, MX
Are you sure you need a block or fairlead there? It is not turning the line or even assuring it is lead fair. It may be keeping from fouling on other things. I would replace it with a stanchion mounted bullseye.
I like the ring idea too!
I do need a fairlead there. Here's another photo showing the lead from the next fairlead back.
20180128_092942.jpg
 
Feb 20, 2011
7,793
Island Packet 35 Tucson, AZ/San Carlos, MX
Why does it need to articulate? If it leads fair, shouldn’t it stay that way? What force is going to cause it to move?
Like I stated earlier, I may be overthinking the whole thing. It's the bullseye's orientation in relation to the control line's preferred angle that's giving me pause.

I think I'll still buy the bullseye and have a go at Jerry-rigging the proper angle of the lead.
Those Jerries...
 
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Gunni

.
Mar 16, 2010
5,937
Beneteau 411 Oceanis Annapolis
But when mounted on the pulpit, the SBO fairlead may deflect the control line's passage parallel to the pulpit rail angle. That's what I'm overthinking about here. :biggrin:
Could be that the hole in the SBO product is large enough for the smallish (3/8ths?) control line to live with the deflection.
You will have a compromise between the furling line lead to the fair lead and on to the drum. Minimize friction in the rest of your fair leads back to the cockpit.
 
Feb 20, 2011
7,793
Island Packet 35 Tucson, AZ/San Carlos, MX
Funny how our spellcheckers keep missing "led" for "lead". :biggrin:

Now if I can just remove the U bolt without breaking it off, that'd be great.
 
Jan 1, 2006
6,097
Slickcraft 26 Greenport, NY
If that block is fixed in position could you run the furling line through the bottom of the block instead of the top. I know it isn't "Right" but the line would lay over the sheave before subtly turning past the stanchion. The extra distance away may keep the line from rubbing on the stanchion as it appears to do now.
 
Feb 20, 2011
7,793
Island Packet 35 Tucson, AZ/San Carlos, MX
If that block is fixed in position could you run the furling line through the bottom of the block instead of the top. I know it isn't "Right" but the line would lay over the sheave before subtly turning past the stanchion. The extra distance away may keep the line from rubbing on the stanchion as it appears to do now.
Not sure I understand your drift. Can you help out a drooling fool?
 

Joe

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Jun 1, 2004
7,454
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
Has anyone seen a fairlead that has a swiveling/rotating hole for the control line to pass through, allowing less deflection, or would I have to engineer something?
This piece, called a "swiveling stanchion mount roller furling fairlead", should do it. The link will show three versions at bottom of page.
 
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Aug 1, 2011
3,959
Catalina 270 255 Wabamun. Welcome to the marina
Not only do most of these additional blocks look like crap, they are in the realm of toe buster. With that, I'd recommend a 7403 Harken furling lead block to resolve the line issues. Out of the way, and looks cool too.
7403.png
DSC00494.JPG
 

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Mar 20, 2012
3,983
Cal 34-III, MacGregor 25 Salem, Oregon
it would seem that the fixed bullseye lead would be perfect there... so im not sure why it may be preferable to have it articulate.
the lead on the line to the drum is so slight that there would be very little friction, and my view of it from the photo, shows the line could nearly run outside the stanchion and not need a lead at all... EXCEPT the sag in the line between the drum and the turning block (that we cant see) that is aft of the lead-in block would cause the line to spool at the bottom of the furling drum.. which is why the bullseye should be a fixed mount, to hold the sag out of the line so it leads perfectly to the middle of the drum, rather than a mounting that would allow the line to furl in any way gravity wanted to lead it on to the drum...
 
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