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Jacklines and Fixed Attachment Points for Tethering on 315


Sep 6, 2020
18
Catalina 315 74 Barrington, RI
I'm looking to add jacklines and fixed attachment points to my 315 for tether attachments. Specifically, where in the cockpit for fixed points, and where on the coach roof (considering the dodger) for the jackline attachments? Any ideas on how best to do this? Thanks!
 
Oct 22, 2014
14,261
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
@asalotto, are you thinking about running the jacklines down the center of the boat or along the rails. I prefer the center, but not everyone agrees.

With a dodger you need to locate a padeye near the cockpit and just infant of the dodger. I use an attached tether on the jackline. When I want to go forward the teather is laying near the cockpit and the dodger. I attach the tether to the harness or PFD tether attachment point. The other end of the jackline is attached to the base of the mast.

How are you thinking about the jacklines and their routing.
 
Sep 6, 2020
18
Catalina 315 74 Barrington, RI
Thanks, John @jssailem . I agree to stay away from the rails. I was thinking to run down both edges of the coach roof, but you now have me thinking about a single center line. How do you attach at the base of the mast? Also, how do you go to the bow, and how do you attach in the cockpit? Thanks, Anthony
 
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Oct 22, 2014
14,261
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
All great questions.
I would suggest there is some good reading about the subject at Morganscloud.com. John Harries has done a lot of thinking about this subject.

I installed a padeye on the bow behind my windlass. I attach my jackline there. I run the jackline to the mast and wrap it around as tight as I can then tie it with a couple of half hitches. I then run my line from Mast to Cabin stop as close as I can and attache to another padeye. I place 2 tethers on the jackline, One to use between the cabin top and the mast, and the second to use from the mast to the bow.

In the cockpit I have a padeye on the deck and I use it with tether to keep me in the cockpit while there. This cockpit tether reaches into the companion way. When I go inside the tether is left in the companion way.

As I move about the boat I connect the next tether and release the tether. Sure it may take what 5 seconds to connect and release while going to the bow. It is an acquired skill and works for me.
 
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Sep 6, 2020
18
Catalina 315 74 Barrington, RI
@jssailem thanks so much! Great ideas! And I'll definitely checkout the reference you provide above. In the meantime, a few follow-ups, please:

1) how do you prevent the loose tether ends from flying around when not in use (as you're only on 1 at a time, or 2 while in transition)?
2) Is your cabin top padeye centered, or do you have one on either side of the cabin top that you'll choose based on tack?
3) Do you have a single line from bow to mast to cabin top, or is this two lines (each starting from the mast)?
4) Where (exactly) is your cockpit padeye? I'm wondering how you navigate the cockpit during tacks, around the pedestal, etc.?

Thanks in advance!
 
Oct 22, 2014
14,261
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
1) how do you prevent the loose tether ends from flying around when not in use (as you're only on 1 at a time, or 2 while in transition)?
I clip the tether to a fitting on the mast or at the cockpit.

2) Is your cabin top padeye centered, or do you have one on either side of the cabin top that you'll choose based on tack?
I have mine on the cabin top near the companion way. I do not have a dodger on my boat. With a dodger you would need to locate the padeye to one side. I always go forward on my Starboard side due to furling line running up the Port side. It is my preference. With a dodger you would need locate the padeye ahead of the dodger and to the side so you can wrap the tether around the side of the dodger and reach it form the cockpit.

3) Do you have a single line from bow to mast to cabin top, or is this two lines (each starting from the mast)?
Yes a single line. It was longer than the boat length so easily makes the trip 2/3rds of the boat from bow to cockpit. John Harries includes some ideas on make it your self jacklines. Provides a resource to the webbing material. I do not have it available at the moment. I'll look in my data. You can make your own jacklines or buy them pre-made. I bought Lewmar jacklines.

4) Where (exactly) is your cockpit padeye? I'm wondering how you navigate the cockpit during tacks, around the pedestal, etc.?
I put the padeye in front of the binnacle on my boat. The tether is long enough for me to move about the boat cockpit. Solo sailing, I have to step in front of my binnacle to tack the boat. It is a bit of a dance. You learn what works and adapt your choreography to fit your needs. Again, I generally move around the binnacle on the starboard side. So the tether follows behind me.
 
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paulj

.
Mar 16, 2007
1,361
Catalina 310 Anacortes,Wa
Most important you must have a quick disconnect that will work while under load from you and the jackline.
 
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Jan 22, 2008
7,949
Beneteau 323 Annapolis MD
, how do you go to the bow, and how do you attach in the cockpit? Thanks, Anthony
I once read an article where the first padeye was just outside of the companionway, below it and above the floor.. So you are attached before stepping out of the cabin.
 
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Apr 5, 2009
1,387
Catalina '88 C30 tr/bs Oak Harbor, WA
On my C30 I run them from the stern cleats to a centerline bow cleat just aft of the anchor locker. I run them inside of the shrouds which anchors them inboard of the rail at midship. I pull them tight and can clip in before leaving the cockpit.
 
Dec 28, 2015
1,068
Laser, Hunter H30 Cherubini Tacoma
I took my Sailrite to the boat and sewed up one custom. It Y’s at the mast and goes through two open spots in my deck organizers on either side, switches to line ( from flat webbing) then into two open corresponding clutches. I crank them in with the cabin top winches then lock them down. I also made tethers for my PFD/harness out of hollow webbing, shock chord and spring clips. I use them also to tie off on my mast when I climb it ( attached to my climbing harness). Works pretty good. Getting the price-per-project for my Sailrite to almost zero by now.
 
Dec 28, 2015
1,068
Laser, Hunter H30 Cherubini Tacoma
Next time I have it out I’ll snap a couple. Form over function for sure. It was one of the first sewing jobs I did. I did a bunch of research on stitch number and strength for it. Sewing a easy, making it look good is another subject.
 
Nov 21, 2012
228
Yamaha 33 Port Ludlow, WA
I took my Sailrite to the boat and sewed up one custom. It Y’s at the mast and goes through two open spots in my deck organizers on either side, switches to line ( from flat webbing) then into two open corresponding clutches. I crank them in with the cabin top winches then lock them down. I also made tethers for my PFD/harness out of hollow webbing, shock chord and spring clips. I use them also to tie off on my mast when I climb it ( attached to my climbing harness). Works pretty good. Getting the price-per-project for my Sailrite to almost zero by now.
Pictures would be great. Claire and I sewed a spinnaker sock last month and I've caught the sewing bug.
IMG_0842.jpg
 
Dec 28, 2015
1,068
Laser, Hunter H30 Cherubini Tacoma
I actually really enjoy it also. I’ve been a woodworker for a long time making all the cabinets and most of the furniture and beds in my house. Sewing is a lot like woodworking without the finishing part. You are able to complete a project in a decent length of time without worrying about weather and the ability to put a finish on it due to humidity and temperature. I’ve made winch, portal, solar and exterior grab rails for my boat and a friends. I also made dinghy chaps for my dinghy. Next big project is going to be to re-upholster my wakeboard boat. That was the main reason I bought it.
 
Nov 21, 2012
228
Yamaha 33 Port Ludlow, WA
I actually really enjoy it also. I’ve been a woodworker for a long time making all the cabinets and most of the furniture and beds in my house. Sewing is a lot like woodworking without the finishing part. You are able to complete a project in a decent length of time without worrying about weather and the ability to put a finish on it due to humidity and temperature. I’ve made winch, portal, solar and exterior grab rails for my boat and a friends. I also made dinghy chaps for my dinghy. Next big project is going to be to re-upholster my wakeboard boat. That was the main reason I bought it.
I do a bit of woodworking as well. Fabric is NOT like plywood.
 
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