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Hull/Deck Joint question on Pearson 36-2

Apr 20, 2020
5
Gilbert 30 Scarborough Bluffs
I'm considering a purchase of a 36-2 from 1986. One feature of this example is an aluminum toe-rail, without the usual plastic moulding protecting the joint. See attached pics. Note that the transom has retained the standard plastic moulding. Was this a factory mod performed on some hulls or is it a mod likely made afterwards? If the later, I'm asking anyone who's familiar with the deck-hull geometry to comment. It's hard to tell exactly but it looks like the bolts are all visible on the underside of the toerail. I'd like to see it for myself but the COVID19 situation prevents me from doing my own investigation. The owner thinks this is the normal configuration. Appreciate any advice.
 

Attachments

Jan 7, 2011
2,825
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
I don’t have make of boat, and the photos are not real clear, but on my O’Day 322, from the same era, doesn’t have a rubber rail....just the aluminum toe rail that comes down the side an inch or 2. Mine is screwed through the middle of the metal rub rail (as opposed to the bottom like yours).

BD22A148-1408-47A4-BCB3-0F6D758CBD84.jpeg


The survey I got before I bought the boat mentioned that there should be a rubber insert, but I haven’t figured out how it would attach.

It hasn’t caused any issues in the 5 years I have had the boat.

Greg
 
Apr 20, 2020
5
Gilbert 30 Scarborough Bluffs
Thanks Greg. I'm also hoping to hear from some Pearson owners as, judging by the look of the exterior of the the hull/deck join, the geometry of the O'Day is different than Pearson's.
 
Jan 7, 2011
2,825
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
Good luck with the purchase. i looked at a few Pearson’s...nice boats...
 
Jul 26, 2009
250
. . .
In my experience researching Cal's and Sabre's from this era, the manufacturers used to include detailed information on the hull to deck joint in their Owner's Manuals. This would normally include a diagram that included the toe/cap rail. 20 minutes going down the Google rabbit hole to try and find an original owner's manual for this boat may pay off.

Purely speculation, but based on the project outlined at the URL below, I would be inclined to believe the aluminum toe rail was not factory. Maybe try to contact the author? In addition, when I expand the 2nd picture you posted it appears as though the seam between the hull/deck joint is exposed. It's tough to say for sure as it's a lower resolution photo and expanding it makes it blurry. From a cosmetic perspective, I doubt Pearson would do that as they were well known for the level of craftsmanship they offered relative to their target market and competition. Pearson's are very well made production boats. None of this is to say there's anything wrong with the current configuration if the modification/repair was done correctly. There's a lot of utility in an aluminum toe rail, not to mention the liberation from teak work...

Pearson-36-2-cap-rail-replacement

You could also try reaching out to Rudy at D&R Marine. He still offers replacement materials for O'Day and Pearson boats (including rub rails) and is an encyclopedia of knowledge for boats from this generation.

D & R Marine

Good luck
 
Apr 20, 2020
5
Gilbert 30 Scarborough Bluffs
Hello Berner73,

Thanks for your advice. I already had done some internet searching and came upon the "Boat de jour" site. Unfortunately he did not include any photos of the work in progress so it was of limited value. I'll keep searching for some diagrams of the flange detail. In the end, a surveyor familiar with the Pearson's construction would probably give me the info I need. Thanks also for the link to D&R Marine. I'll check that out also.
 
Jan 7, 2011
2,825
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
In my experience researching Cal's and Sabre's from this era, the manufacturers used to include detailed information on the hull to deck joint in their Owner's Manuals. This would normally include a diagram that included the toe/cap rail. 20 minutes going down the Google rabbit hole to try and find an original owner's manual for this boat may pay off.

Purely speculation, but based on the project outlined at the URL below, I would be inclined to believe the aluminum toe rail was not factory. Maybe try to contact the author? In addition, when I expand the 2nd picture you posted it appears as though the seam between the hull/deck joint is exposed. It's tough to say for sure as it's a lower resolution photo and expanding it makes it blurry. From a cosmetic perspective, I doubt Pearson would do that as they were well known for the level of craftsmanship they offered relative to their target market and competition. Pearson's are very well made production boats. None of this is to say there's anything wrong with the current configuration if the modification/repair was done correctly. There's a lot of utility in an aluminum toe rail, not to mention the liberation from teak work...

Pearson-36-2-cap-rail-replacement

You could also try reaching out to Rudy at D&R Marine. He still offers replacement materials for O'Day and Pearson boats (including rub rails) and is an encyclopedia of knowledge for boats from this generation.

D & R Marine

Good luck
Or the rubber insert has been removed from the aluminum rub rail.

Greg
 

Ariel

.
Feb 1, 2006
279
Pearson 36-2 Houston, TX / Rock Hall, MD
The aluminum toe rail was installed later. This is the original plastic rail on my 1987 P 36-2.
DSCN0842.JPG


Under the rail there is another plastic trim piece that covers the bolts.

This is a picture of the original stern cap. ( I have a hangup about advertising for builders, hence the picture of Ariel in place of Pearson).
DSCN0385.JPG


In about 1998 I had to replace the plastic rails after storm damage to the rails. At that time D&R had the items in stock but that may not be the case today.

Just a note, every 5 to 7 years when I have to strip the teak caps for new varnish (now Cetol) I dream about replacing the rails with aluminum. Then I look at the beauty of the teak and keep working.

Dave
S/V ARIEL
 

Ariel

.
Feb 1, 2006
279
Pearson 36-2 Houston, TX / Rock Hall, MD
One more thing. The owners manual does not mention the hull/deck joint. It is an industry standard configuration with sealer between the two pieces. The nice thing is, the connecting bolts are on the outside and water does not enter the hull by way of the bolt.
Dave
S/V ARIEL
 

NYSail

.
Jan 6, 2006
2,716
Beneteau 423 Mt. Sinai, NY
As Dave said this is a modification done by a po. When I bought my 1986 36-2 I completely replaced the rub rails. Bought them from D&R. The hull to deck is just sandwiched together with the bolts from the toe rail holding it together. When I did replace I cleaned out and redid much of the hull/deck joint as it is a source of water leakage. Also agree with Dave.... I loved the teak. Actually I redid mine same lengths and angles but made them a bit beefier with less of a cavity underneath...... just big enough for bolt heads.

good luck.... great boats!


greg