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How are Sabres higher quality?

Oct 22, 2014
13,397
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
But from what I see they start at $4,000! yikes..
Just because you see YouTube sailors taking off with no knowledge and sailing across big waters, you did not think it would be for free.
Outfitting a boat, even one advertised as "Ready to take you Cruising" cost money. If you have room to store water you take away room to store food. Water makers allow you to make your own water so you have the room to store food. At $4000 it less expensive than adding another 2 feet to the boat length for water storage.
 

jviss

.
Feb 5, 2004
4,597
Tartan 3800 Westport, MA
I believe it's actually 44 gallon, I may have messed up the numbers.
It's 38 gal. according to sailboatdata.com.

We use the water for washing ourselves and dishes; usually use bottled water for drinking. Cook with water from the tanks.

On the C36 with kids on board it was getting water every other day. With just my wife and me, every four days or so.

Surely for passage making you'd be drinking that water, and would be stingy about washing yourself, i guess. A lot of our showers, short as they were, were to rinse off the salt water after swimming.

My primary objection to a watermaker besides cost and maintenance is the power consumption. I would be running my main engine all the time! Coastal cruising there are plenty of places to pick up water, and in some ports there's deliver available! (Nantucket, Block Island.) And ice, too!
 
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Nov 18, 2010
2,426
Catalina 310 Hingham, MA
A watermaker is a possibility to reduce water storage needs (just emergency rations only). But from what I see they start at $4,000! yikes..
First rule of cruising early (we started at 40) is that you only buy electronics that come new in a box.

We bought our watermaker for $1500. If I had a larger boat I would have bought a Spectra unit I found used for $2000. That was also a 12 volt unit but made 15 gallons per hour for the same 18 amps of power. However it is a physically larger unit and I couldn't find the space to install it. So instead I showed it to a friend with a 38 foot catamaran. He bought it which made his unit for sale. So it worked out in the end.
 
Aug 16, 2018
75
Seaward 23 Annapolis
It's 38 gal. according to sailboatdata.com.

We use the water for washing ourselves and dishes; usually use bottled water for drinking. Cook with water from the tanks.

On the C36 with kids on board it was getting water every other day. With just my wife and me, every four days or so.

Surely for passage making you'd be drinking that water, and would be stingy about washing yourself, i guess. A lot of our showers, short as they were, were to rinse off the salt water after swimming.

My primary objection to a watermaker besides cost and maintenance is the power consumption. I would be running my main engine all the time! Coastal cruising there are plenty of places to pick up water, and in some ports there's deliver available! (Nantucket, Block Island.) And ice, too!
Yes in a passage scenario I don't think you'd use fresh water for showers, and 50/50 saltwater for dishes etc. Could make it last a bit longer. I used to spend week+ at a cabin with only well water (carried in buckets up a hill), and wipe your face with a damp cloth was the only "shower" we got that whole time:)

Power use is certainly an issue. Guess have to count that vs saving storage for food etc. From what I see watermakers use 4-9 amps and up. That would be 70-150 Watts of solar for example. Water production for the smallest was 2 hr per day to get water for 4 people, i.e. 8 amp to get your daily water. That can be an issue on a smaller boat with smaller batteries and less space for solar..
 
Oct 22, 2014
13,397
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
That can be an issue on a smaller boat with smaller batteries and less space for solar..
Only if you engineer it to be. Boats are engineering compromises attached to financial limitations. You want to sail from LA to Hawaii, 2,200 miles, it has been done in a 15 foot boat. Mostly stock with lots of stuff strapped to the deck. 36 days transit.
http://www.msog.org/yarns/hawaii15.cfm
Many things are possible. What you need to consider is what do you want to do.
 
Nov 18, 2010
2,426
Catalina 310 Hingham, MA
We added the watermaker in St. Thomas. We had been out for almost 2 years. Doing the east coast with a 35 gallon tank was easy. Water stops are plentiful.

The 6 months we spent in the Bahamas was the most difficult for water. The way our boat is setup there is the 35 gallon tank, the water heater is 20 gallons, we would carry 2 5-gallon cans on the rail and we had a 20 gallon bladder. I would use the bladder for water runs and had a pump setup to empty it into the tank.

When we were heading to some more deserted islands, like Lee Stocking our favorite spot in the Bahamas, we would tie the bladder down on deck and fill it. In this configuration we could go 3-4 weeks. This would include bypassing the water heater and draining it into a bucket to put the water in the tank. Typically we would run out of gas for the dinghy before water. We would not rinse off every day and we did crazy thinks like bucket water from cisterns at abandoned houses for laundry. Dishes were washed in salt with a very light fresh water rinse and we even boiled things like lobster, pasta and eggs in saltwater.

We did have issues with places that claimed to have fresh water in the Bahamas. Often. We would test the water and it would be over 1000 ppm TDS. Or they would tell us it's not drinkable. We have had to sail 30 nm out of our way for water. Even bought some gallons of water at $5 per gallon once while desperate.

We also never paid more than $0.50 a gallon for water (except those few gallon we bought. So you can't justify the cost of a watermaker by how much you pay for water. It's convenience and an Independence thing. But that governs a lot of decisions on our boat.

By the way, we removed the 20 gallon water heater. Just too big and it was starting to rot out in a few spots. We put a 6 gallon back in. So that wouldn't be worth the trouble to bypass and drain. But it did leave room for a 6 gallon rum tank ;).