DSC Radio Note

Jun 2, 2004
136
Beneteau 393 Lake Texoma, Texas
The FCC announced the following today:

Released: 09/13/2010. WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS BUREAU REMINDS
MARINERS, MANUFACTURERS, AND RETAILERS THAT NON-PORTABLE DSC RADIOS
APPROVED UNDER PRIOR TECHNICAL STANDARD MAY NOT BE MANUFACTURED,
IMPORTED, SOLD, OR INSTALLED AS OF MARCH 25, 2011. (DA No. 10-1728).
WTB . Contact: Ghassan Khalek at (202) 418-0680, email:
Ghassan.Khalek@fcc.gov, TTY: (202) 418-7233
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-10-1728A1.doc
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-10-1728A1.pdf
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-10-1728A1.txt
 

Brian D

Moderator
Feb 17, 2006
4,505
Lancer 27PS MCB Camp Pendleton, Ca KF6BL
A quick note here.

If you have already installed a fix-station (non-portable) DSC radio on your boat before the 5/25/11 deadline, you are fine. You can still use the radio. It does not become obsolete. So don't think that on 5/25/11 you need a new radio, you do not.

I am not an FCC expert, but I did stay at a Holiday-Inn last night. (I read the whole document :) )
 

Brian D

Moderator
Feb 17, 2006
4,505
Lancer 27PS MCB Camp Pendleton, Ca KF6BL
New radios being manufactured must meet new specs that come into service on March 5, 2011. The new specs are for safety. They old radios can still be used but if the radio fails after 5/25, you cannot replace with the same model you have. It must be a new radio that meets the new specs.

However, like I said, if it works, it is good and does not need to be replaced.


From the Notice:

"Compliance with these new technical standards will ensure that DSC-equipped radios incorporate many new safety features and functions, and will eliminate the dangers associated with the automatic channel switching feature on some current models of DSC-equipped radios, as addressed in a recent United States Coast Guard Marine Safety Alert."
 
Sep 15, 2009
6,241
S2 9.2a Fairhope Al
New radios being manufactured must meet new specs that come into service on March 5, 2011. The new specs are for safety. They old radios can still be used but if the radio fails after 5/25, you cannot replace with the same model you have. It must be a new radio that meets the new specs.

However, like I said, if it works, it is good and does not need to be replaced.


From the Notice:

"Compliance with these new technical standards will ensure that DSC-equipped radios incorporate many new safety features and functions, and will eliminate the dangers associated with the automatic channel switching feature on some current models of DSC-equipped radios, as addressed in a recent United States Coast Guard Marine Safety Alert."

thanks...i was hopeing they were going to make the range better but guess that is not the case ...would be nice if they could say reach out 150 nm or so but then again that may creat radio havoc ........

regards

woody
 
Mar 20, 2004
1,532
Hunter 356 and 216 Portland, ME
the BIG (only??) issue is that the earlier DSC radios automatically switched channels when receiving a DSC call, without any warning. You could be switched off your active channel while handling a distress call, transiting a bridge, avoiding a tanker or docking...and not realize that the silence is caused by being off the channel. The original warning bulletin simply said do not use the radio to make DSC calls, and be aware of the possible switch if someone calls you. You should still use it for maydays, etc.
 
Dec 1, 2009
274
Tillotson Pearson J/36 Southport, CT
Legal issues

thanks...i was hopeing they were going to make the range better but guess that is not the case ...would be nice if they could say reach out 150 nm or so but then again that may creat radio havoc ........

regards

woody
Increasing the range would involve changing several laws... of Physics. The shorter wavelengths used by VHF radios don't reflect off the atmosphere the way longer waves (such as SSB) can. That's why FM radio stations fade out as you drive away from them. Getting a mast high enough to have a 150 mile range (think Empire State Building or Sears Tower) and then the power to push the signal that far as well would be interesting developments on boats.
 

JVB

Jan 26, 2006
268
Schock Wavelength 24 Lake Murray, SC
I started out going the FCC.com route to getting my MMSI number for my VHF with Digital Selective Calling. It is a relatively long and complicated process compared to the boatus and seatow options. Going thru the FCC.gov website you need to get a Restricted Radio Telephone Operator's Permit, which I already have since I fly planes. You also have to get a station license for your boat or airplane. I stopped going thru the FCC process when I discovered the price tag would be $160. I'll do the boatus.com route tomorrow.
 
Mar 12, 2008
555
Jeanneau 49 DS San Pedro, CA
I started out going the FCC.com route to getting my MMSI number for my VHF with Digital Selective Calling. It is a relatively long and complicated process compared to the boatus and seatow options. Going thru the FCC.gov website you need to get a Restricted Radio Telephone Operator's Permit, which I already have since I fly planes. You also have to get a station license for your boat or airplane. I stopped going thru the FCC process when I discovered the price tag would be $160. I'll do the boatus.com route tomorrow.
Unless you are going to travel internationally, no need to get a MMSI from the FCC.
 
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