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1983 H30 Chainplates

Aug 11, 2009
7
2 25.5 Freeport
Just had a survey done on a 1983 H30. Major issue was the support "beam" handling the load for the chainplates has corroded/rusted from the bilge to 1/2 way up the port side... I'm pretty bummed, so before I can get a repair estimate, has anyone experienced this issue? Any idea of cost??? TIA!!!
 
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Feb 21, 2013
2,182
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
Welcome to the forum!!

Do not get bummed!! Every used boat boat I have purchased has had some issues, most minor and some major but repairable that required a repair allowance from the Seller. I would get an estimate ASAP from multiple boat contractors, including the boat yard where you did the haul out for the survey, as you are going to have to decide whether or not buy the boat to buy the boat with or without a repair allowance from the Seller BEFORE you sign off on the survey contingency.
 
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Aug 11, 2009
7
2 25.5 Freeport
Thank you! Maybe I should have been more specific, but on this "83 Hunter 30, the chain plates on the deck are supported by 3 rods that are inside the boat, and these chain plate rods are supported by a joining "thimble" and then that is attached to some metal "band/beam" that runs down toward the compression plate and up to the starboard side joining in the chain plate rods on that side. This steel "band/beam" has corroded completely from at least the bilge and half way up the port side. I just wonder how in the world this can be repaired???
Any idea of what I am trying to describe or talking about?
 
Feb 21, 2013
2,182
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
You were specific enough. I would get repair estimates from boat contractors ASAP to make an informed decision on whether to proceed with the boat purchase.
 
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dLj

.
Mar 23, 2017
1,581
Belliure 41 Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
Anything in a boat can be repaired, it just depends upon how much money you want to throw at it. Of course when the amount of money exceeds the value of the boat then it's not recommended - usually.

Unless you are thinking to do the work yourself - why even worry about how it must be done? Just get an estimate from someone that knows how to do it... Find that cost, make your decisions.

And if you are thinking of doing the work yourself, get the estimate and don't expect to be able to do it for less, not if you count your time. Most professionals are surprisingly fast at doing these repairs - compared to what it will take you...

dj
 

RoyS

.
Jun 3, 2012
940
Hunter 33 Steamboat Wharf, Hull, MA
I see that you originally posted on the Cherubini Hunters site. I have a 1980 Cherubini H33 and the chainplates are not connected in the manner that you describe. I would think that our boats would be similar. On mine there are large protruding fiberglass brackets attached to the hull sides up against the underside of the deck. These are covered with wood for cosmetic reasons. The chainplates are bolted to these brackets. First you should determine if the arrangement that you describe is original or something added later. It sounds more like lightning protection than structural. Or, it may be a later model Hunter with a different design. The Cherubinis ran through 1983, so yours may be the newer model by a different designer.
 
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Aug 11, 2009
7
2 25.5 Freeport
RoyS - I believe mine is different for a 1983 model. There are 3 Rods inside the cabin supporting the chainplates on deck port & starboard. The Port rods meet at a a stainless steel fitting, and that fitting is attached to something that is glassed into the boat. According to surveyor, this steel/metal piece they are attached to runs down through the hull up to the Starboard side attaching the Rods. This metal "support" has corroded from the bilge and working it's way up each side, with port being the worst condition.
 
May 27, 2004
1,631
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
Lance, you are correct. Hunter changed the design in 83 due to problems with water egress to the bulkhead mount that the earlier versions had.
I'm guessing that the major cost of your repair will be the new "straps" that you would want to be made of 316 stainless. The removal of the old ones is basic fiberglass cutting and prep for installing the new ones.
I would want to find a pro who does fiberglass work for a living and watch how he does it
(if possible). You might offer him extra to watch and ask questions. That would be a
'Masters Level' course in boat repair.
A YouTube channel call "Boatworks Today" has a ton of vids on this kind of work.
Whatever you do, don't try this job 'at home'. :badbad:
 
Aug 11, 2009
7
2 25.5 Freeport
@ggrizzard ... can you guesstimate the cost of this job? (ain't no way on the planet I would even attempt this, or any other job). Thank you!
 
May 31, 2007
740
Hunter 37 cutter Blind River
Photos would help, Lance324. I have owned two Cherubinis and looked at many others and have never seen what you describe. Some photos would assist in estimating what I would charge for such a job as I do a lot of boat repair.
 
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Aug 11, 2009
7
2 25.5 Freeport
I didn't take pictures, the surveyor did though and I can share after I get them. But, this is how it was explained to me by someone who is having the same issue: (My issue is in bold italics).
This is what you are dealing with. I have the same on my ‘82 H30. If just the vertical portion in the bilge is rusted out, it’s an easy fix. Cut it out and replace it with an epoxied together stack of 3” x 3” G10 fiberglass blocks. If the horizontal rib is bad, that’s a bigger deal, hard to replace without major surgery, but moving the chainplates out to the toe rail and abandoning the steel tube rib (except for the vertical part) seems to be an option. There has been much discussion about this on the sailboatowners.com forum. Look for posts by Dianna of Burlington, aka John Cherubini Jr, son of the designer of these boats.
 

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Dec 28, 2015
1,105
Laser, Hunter H30 Cherubini Tacoma
I’m thinking the seller isn’t interested in funding a rig redesign so moving them is out. Probably not also in the actual repair. I’d not spend much time on this and get a bid for repair add 25-35% for down time and hassle and minus that off of the asking price. Probably puts the boat value close to free. They will decline then move on and let them sit on it for a while then offer it again .
 
Mar 20, 2011
562
Hunter 31_83-87 New Orleans
Lance. Send me a PM and I can go over chain plate attachment points from inside my ‘84 H31 and send pics. Previously posted some of these before, see links below. Jerry


 
May 27, 2004
1,631
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
Lance, I think Sandpiper is the "go to" guy for an estimate. I would not attempt this repair either, BUT, You made the statement that you would not attempt any other job yourself.

May I suggest that the age of the boat you are looking at (or any other brand/size) is going to require many repairs. Some major perhaps, but most minor. If you proceed with any purchase,
you will either pay the equivalent of a much more expensive/newer boat if you need a pro to do these repairs.
I suggested the "BoatworksToday"' YouTube channel as a way to begin your education in boat repairs. There are dozens more covering everything from fiberglass repair to engine maintenance and rigging repair and electrical work. The list goes on to cover virtually every boat ownership topic. You will find that once you learn the skills needed, you will do a far better job of most repairs/refit that the yard "pro" you hire.
Hell, you might even enjoy the process. But that's just my opinion.
YMMV
 
Jun 5, 2010
1,021
Hunter 25 0 Burlington NJ
I e-mailed Lance and cautioned him about what sounds like a truly ridiculous set-up with this all-metal apparatus connecting all the chainplates together. I've never seen the like of that in a boat of this vintage or price range and I truly don't see any advantage in it. Given a good view of how it looks now, I would redesign an entirely new system relying on fiberglass, not metal. In my experience nothing that's structural metal and involves exposure to bilge water ever lasts very long.

I would need to see good photos of the as-is condition before making any serious recommendations; however (big HOWEVER) I would be very strongly inclined to fabricate something all-new that makes more sense than how the current situation seems.

It appears the poor H30 is suffering another metal-based construction/design disaster, the first being the terribly ill-advised I-beam in the bilge. BOTH of these liabilities can be easily fixed using structural fiberglass and, if done properly, will never give trouble for another 35-40 years easily.

Speaking as one who's been building wooden, composite and fiberglass boats since well before the H30 saw the light of day (and I was actually there when it did), I would not devote any effort to restoring the metallic madness that's there but would rather focus on using better methods and better materials from this point forward.
 
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May 31, 2007
740
Hunter 37 cutter Blind River
Seeing the above diagram as well as the H34 chainplate mod linked above, I tend to agree with Dianna of Burlington. Keep unnecessary metals out of the bilge - especially in salt water! I envision chainplates attached to knees and bulkheads as in the H33 (79 - 85?) and H37C.
 
May 31, 2007
740
Hunter 37 cutter Blind River
Interesting that due to leaky chainplates damaging knees and bulkheads, Hunter switched to the rod and metal strapping system. Saves the woodwork I suppose but doesn't stop the leaks! A few years ago I did extensive work on an upscale vessel which also had an unusual design but instead of a steel strap crossing the boat through the bilge, the three stays were mounted to an angled stainless strap which was glassed onto the side of the hull. There were also shorter straps welded on which butted up against the deck to take some of the load. That was a huge job. All interior cabinetry had to come out, glass strapping removed etc. The manufacturer now keeps in stock a kit for this update. They also scaled up the gauge of the stainless and the grade. By glassing in all the strapping the manufacturer ensured that leaks would be caught inside the strapping, creating a perfect scenario for crevice corrosion. They no longer advise encapsulation.
 
May 27, 2004
1,631
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
I don't understand the change either, even though I didn't tend to the chain plate/deck cutouts
and suffered damage to two cabinet panels and one bulkhead due to leaks.
It's all been replaced, but I was such a noob. To me, deck flex was an unknown reality 43 years ago... (until it wasn't). :yikes: