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Which "One Sail" would you select?

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Clark

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Jun 30, 2004
880
Hunter 280 Lake Guntersville, AL
I'm in the process of converting from a CDI furler to hank-on sails on our Capri 22 TR/FK. We race the boat in our club events and we are NOT hotshots by any means. I've found that too many times, I needed to select a different sail for a race and the CDI just isn't conducive to that (in fact, it is a PITA). I have a nice blade, an OEM 135 and a 150. My budget is somewhat limited and I'd like to replace one of the larger sails but I am unsure which would be the best choice for us. I sail with just my wife so no "rail meat" available and we sail on an inland lake where winds can be pretty flukey. Would a nice 135 be a better choice or the 150 or . . . . ??

Thanks for your input.

Clark
 

ghost

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May 18, 2007
50
NULL NULL Toronto
I'd go for the 150. If it gets too windy, you might reef the main to depower the boat and still keep the 150 up.
 
Dec 4, 2008
264
Other people's boats - Milford, CT
Clark, it's hard to guess which sail you would be best with, but from my memories of sailing on Lake Lanier, GA, I would bet the 150 would be best for light flukey winds. That and the blade would give you the ability to adapt for wind speeds.

Which sails do you use the most ? Could you experiment and try and see if you might live with the selected sail for the whole time.


Forgive the suggestion if you have allready considered these options other than new sails:
1) get a more conventional furler, these use a normal jib halyard and make sail changes pretty easy. But it is pretty expensive.

2) convert your sails to hanks.

3) would one of the used sail lofts ( Bacon sails, etc ) take your current sails in trade ?
 

Clark

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Jun 30, 2004
880
Hunter 280 Lake Guntersville, AL
Good stuff guys; thanks. Todd, I did consider a nicer furler - a Harken or Shaefer - but as you say, cost is an issue and my plan is to convert the others to hanks. I also believe that at least a couple of places will take trade-ins but only against their new sails. I'm considering either US or North for my primary "go-to" with either Schurr or Gus(?) as alternatives. It is possible that Schurr would take a trade as they do have a few used ones for sale.

Keep up the suggestions!
 
Jun 9, 2004
963
Hunter 40.5 Bayfield, WI
Clark-I have raced Capri 22's on a large inland lake with flukey swirly wind patterns, shifts and gusts. It's great you have a blade so if I was looking to replace a headsail I would go with the 150 unless you have a spinnaker. If you have a spinnaker I'd go with the 135.
Good luck!
 
Oct 26, 2008
5,020
Catalina 320 Barnegat, NJ
I take it that you have a fractional rig so I am not sure if my comments are applicable ... having mast head rig ... When we bought new sails, I had a 150 made with a deck sweeping clew. I might beg to differ that you might be better off with a 135. I find it unnecessarily large and wonder if the performance would be better with a smaller cut. The largest sail area doesn't necessarily translate to faster upwind speed. I think pointing higher with a smaller sail may be more effective.

I have now installed a backstay adjuster and will be experimenting with upwind performance.
 
May 23, 2004
3,317
I'm in the market as were . Colonial Beach
why not go to a double slotted forestay. I use to race on boats with them and it allows for quick head sail changes. You also would be able to use the sails that you have and not have to convert them.
 

RichH

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Feb 14, 2005
4,773
Tayana 37 cutter; I20/M20 SCOWS Worton Creek, MD
Id offer a compromise especially if you race in a no-spinnaker class ...

For the 'light and flukeys' Id keep what you have and ADD to the sail inventory ... and consider a flatish-cut free-flying 'racing cut' 150% 'drifter' (with moderate 'shoulder' high up towards the head for max power (for accelerating) in the light winds but yet flat and with a precise flat luff 'entry shape' ... enough to affect max. speed) .... either made from 1.5 oz. ripstop nylon or 2-4 oz. dacron. Such a drifter will have its 'luff wire' (super strong high tech polymer line) included in the luff sleeve ... just raise the sail and 'pull the halyard tight to affect the proper luff shape - like you do with an asymmetric spinnaker. Such a sail will need 'special design' from the local sail loft as I suggest a 'moderately large shoulder' aloft but flat luff entry shape for decent pointing ability if needed when even the 135 wont perform in the 'super-lights'. Use the drifter on the reaching legs, and drop/peel the drifter and unfurl the 135% on the upwind beat. A drifter is usually a 'lower cost' sail because of the easy to work and lighter weight materials. Youre not going to get such a sail from a 'mail order' sail loft.

A 135 will usually perform much better when beating in comparison to a 150 especially in the 'light winds' where a 150 usually always suffers from flow 'separation' along the leeside especally in the aft sections... in the light and flukeys there usually isnt enough 'energy' in the wind to keep the leeside flow streams attached when youre sailing 'aerodynamic', youll have a better chance to keep the flow attachment with a 135 (or even 'smaller) ... youll need a FULL set of tell tales and 'gentry tufts' to discern this.

Method: upwind, use the 135 until after rounding the first mark, then raise the drifter on top of the 135 and then furl the 135 when on the reaches. Going back downwind, turn the leeward mark and change/peel back to the 135 ... and youll have the 'best' sail up for each leg, especially on a triangular course.
If you sail olympic windward-leeward then the 135 will probably be 'best' overall (especially if you 'tack downwind' to keep your apparent wind speed 'up').

Im not a big fan of BIG genoas when racing in the 'light and flukeys' ... too unstable and vulnerable to 'separation stalls' going upwind. To me, BIG is only useful when going 'down' or 'across'.
 

RichH

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Feb 14, 2005
4,773
Tayana 37 cutter; I20/M20 SCOWS Worton Creek, MD
why not go to a double slotted forestay. I use to race on boats with them and it allows for quick head sail changes. You also would be able to use the sails that you have and not have to convert them.
Totally agree. Consider a double grooved 'Tuff Luff' ... allows one to have two head sails 'up' when changing headsails so you dont have to go 'bareheaded' between the 'headsail changes'.
 
Oct 26, 2008
5,020
Catalina 320 Barnegat, NJ
That's one of the reasons ...

Totally agree. Consider a double grooved 'Tuff Luff' ... allows one to have two head sails 'up' when changing headsails so you dont have to go 'bareheaded' between the 'headsail changes'.
That I will purchase the Harken Mark IV furler opposed to the Schaefer ... double track.
 

Clark

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Jun 30, 2004
880
Hunter 280 Lake Guntersville, AL
Wow! Tons of brain fodder. Our Spring series just ended so my plan is to remove the furler and play with the hanked 135 that I have. If it does well in light winds (in abundance here in the Summer), I may go with that. I do have an Asymm spinnaker that is allowed here but in our windward/leeward courses, it might not be worth it. I have a friend with a Sonar that has a drifter so I may try to borrow that and play with it too.

Thanks again to all your thoughts. This place is the BEST!
 

RichH

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Feb 14, 2005
4,773
Tayana 37 cutter; I20/M20 SCOWS Worton Creek, MD
\ I do have an Asymm spinnaker that is allowed here but in our windward/leeward courses, it might not be worth it.
Keep the 150 and 135 and 110 ... 'as is' covert them with the correct 'continuous luff support tape so they fit into your current furler or get a 'proper' reefing furler - Harken, etc.

USE THE ASYMMETRIC (forget the drifter) and learn to 'tack downwind' with it ... so you keep your downind apparent wind at a maximum (learn how to sail a VMG course !!!!!!!!!) If possible get a launching tube for the Asymm or learn how to set it up in 'stops', dont screw around with a cumbersome chute-scoop or 'snuffer' that only adds complexity and adds more 'rope' to trip over. (if youre serious, consider a spinnaker furler ... we just saved you that amount from buying a new sail ... that you can use for the spinn. furler).

:)
 
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