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What mods have you made to make single-handing easier?

Apr 2, 2021
94
Hunter 38 Ft. Pierce
I have a 2007 H38.

As the title suggests, looking for ideas or tips on what you've done to make single-handing easier. I've already replaced a block for the jib furling line with one that has a cam cleat arrangement which helps managing the jib.

I also plan on reorienting the stripper on the sheet winches so that I can more easily haul on the line while behind the wheel. If anyone has done this a pic showing the orientation would be great.

Anything else?

(I have furling main and jib)
 
Feb 21, 2013
2,928
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
Jib furling line cam cleat is a really good idea. Besides autopilot, travel lines mounted on the arch and all line leading to the cockpit, one improvement I have seen is routing the main sheet to the side of the arch with easy access from the helm as discussed in this thread Hunter 39 Main sheet at the helm | Sailboat Owners Forums
 
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Jul 7, 2004
7,863
Hunter 30T Cheney, KS
The cam cleat was a good idea. I've been thinking of replacing my horn cleat with one. I have the old Hood continuous line furler. I may be the odd one but I like it.
I've never paid much attention to the stripper orientation but reclocking it should be simple once you know where.
All your lines should be led aft already like my Hunter. I can't think of anything Hunter already hasn't. Cup holders maybe?
 
Apr 2, 2021
94
Hunter 38 Ft. Pierce
The cam cleat was a good idea. I've been thinking of replacing my horn cleat with one. I have the old Hood continuous line furler. I may be the odd one but I like it.
I've never paid much attention to the stripper orientation but reclocking it should be simple once you know where.
All your lines should be led aft already like my Hunter. I can't think of anything Hunter already hasn't. Cup holders maybe?
I left the horn cleat intact, simply replaced the block that is attached at the bottom of the arch support with one that has a cam cleat. Copied Quadrille although I didn't use a shackle they way he did and I reclocked the cam cleat part.

idk about cup holders, but I definitely need better seating at the helm. Essentially stood for a week plus coming up from Ft. Lauderdale.
 
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Jul 7, 2004
7,863
Hunter 30T Cheney, KS
idk about cup holders, but I definitely need better seating at the helm. Essentially stood for a week plus coming up from Ft. Lauderdale.
I hear you with the seating! A PO bought a nice set of BottomSider (now out of business) cockpit cushions, but the one for the arched helm seat won't stay put.
 
Dec 28, 2015
1,252
Laser, Hunter H30 Cherubini Tacoma
definitely an autopilot or autohelm. I use it to go below and get a beer :biggrin:
He has ST winches that he wants to change the tail clocking on. I have no idea which "o'clock" works best
It the clocking was in my Lewmar manual. You want them to strip into the cockpit if possible but they need to be oriented correctly.
 
Feb 17, 2006
5,067
Lancer 27PS MCB Camp Pendleton KF6BL
The only thing I have done on my boat is autopilot. However, when I learned how to seriously balance my sails, autopilot was not needed. Once the sails were balanced, the helm stayed put. Yes there was some lee way, but that is normal, autopilot or not. The key is once balanced, one has to make minor adjustments when there is a shift in the wind.
 

JimP

.
Dec 26, 2014
13
Hunter 386 Barnegat Bay, NJ
Make sure your autopilot is networked to your wind indicator. This allows you to set the sails for a given wind angle and then the boat will steer the apparent wind back and forth through minor shifts keeping maximum speed without having to re trim. Really good for tweaking sail shape to get max speed for a given angle.
 
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Likes: Ward H
Jan 7, 2011
2,615
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
Autopilot
Lazy jacks/ sail bag (MackPack)
ST winches
Jib furling line run to cabintop rope clutch (trying this for first time this year)
Milwaukee right-angle drill and winch bit for raising the mainsail

Greg
 
Jan 7, 2011
2,615
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
I have a on the dock, with a loop, that hangs on a Shepard’s hook at the end of the dock. Length is sized to put loop over cabin-top winch, and stops the bow inches from the dock….a little forward thrust keeps the boat up against the finger pier.

Makes me a whole lot more comfortable docking in a cross wind that could blow me into my neighbors boat, and keeps me tight to the pier so I can tie her up.

I single hand 90% of the time.

Greg
 

Joe

.
Jun 1, 2004
7,344
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
The most important thing is a reliable autopilot. That will allow you to leave the helm to do anything else with confidence The winch stripper arm should be oriented to deposit the sheet's tail to the desired location... inboard near the person trimming. Single handing is more about having a plan for every action. That gives you confidence. Some of the things you'll want to rehearse include docking by yourself, picking up a mooring, changing sails, reefing, etc. In my case, early on I found it important to keep the boat hook handy and to carry a few sail ties in my pocket when I left the cockpit. You'll also want a tether for your PFD harness and know where you're going to clip on when you move around the boat.... oh... and the tether and harness are worthless if you don't wear them... doesn't make any difference how pleasant the weather is....wear the damn harness and clip on!
 
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Oct 22, 2014
15,298
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
This allows you to set the sails for a given wind angle and then the boat will steer the apparent wind back and forth through minor shifts keeping maximum speed without having to re trim.
Jim this is an often used function but it has a flaw. If you sail for more than an hour or so you’ll notice the wind gradually changes direction as the weather fronts move across the countryside. If your out on the water with AP slaving to the wind, as the wind changes your course changes. As the northerly gradually becomes a southerly your boat sails a 180. Not a problem if you want to sail wandering about “wherever the wind takes us”. If your trying to cross the water to get somewhere specific like to meet the grandkids at that marina near their house or to the special anchorage to see the perfect sunset, a really issue.

Better is to set your course and then trim your sails to sail that course. As the wind shifts your AP holds true course and sail trim is adjusted to keep the boat going on course and at best speed.
 
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Oct 26, 2010
1,327
Hunter 40.5 Beaufort, SC
1. Halyard winch electric conversion (Lewmar) - (just hit 70 and the big main is a chore without it)
2. Rotory Drive autopilot installed inside the binnacle (replaced wheel autopilot that was undersized)
3. Nifty little device that lets me adjust course on the autopilot from a remote controller I can wear on my wrist
4. "Landing Loop" - Wife uses it to hook a cleat on the dock and I use it when solo sailing - works very well with some practice. Except strong crosswind or opposing tide/wind don't need anybody on the dock to tie up.
5 Dock lines with colored whipping at the correct spot for cleating down (hook the dock line on the shore cleat with the Landing Loop and cleat the midship spring line down at the mark - power forward slowly and snug up to the slip - easy peasy.

Boat already came with lazy jacks, stack pack and midship cleat

I always wear my PFD when I am solo sailing but I'll have to admit I don't always clip on a safety line if the weather is calm ( I know I should) Almost all of my solo sailing is "day sailing" within less than a mile or two from shore - still no excuse for not cllipping on - "I stand corrected, sir"

I like the idea of a cam cleat for the jib furler line.