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Wednesday is always Photoday!!

TomY

Alden Forum Moderator
Jun 22, 2004
1,938
Alden 38' Challenger yawl Rockport Harbor
We sailed 15 miles to an island for an overnight, and back the next day, on a 7 knot average, breeze.

After a lifetime of sailing, I'm still amazed by this super power of sail: The propulsion for our 16,000 pound sailboat was carbon free. The ride (thanks Jon), was priceless.

Fox wind 2.jpg


We met friends of similar age at that island that powered there in 3 like sized (36'+) motorboats. I like motorboats. For speed, they are a superior means of transportation.

Sailing is altogether different, it attaches itself to you and often doesn't let go. It also gets you to your destination, usually more slowly, but that's secondary to a sailor.

There is a growing trend, mostly among younger people, to lower their carbon footprint in life. Life includes recreation.

Once a new generation has the means for more recreation, will burning 10 to 20 gallons of fuel per hour be as appealing as it is today? I have trouble seeing that.

Is a sail renaissance possible in the future?
Promote sailing.jpg
 
Jun 14, 2010
1,050
Quorning Dragonfly 1200 home
Monday leaving Woods Hole (against the current). Strong currents like this always make me uneasy. Whether it's Woods Hole Passage, The East River (NYC), the Cape Cod Canal, or Plum Gut -- I always check my fuel filter vacuum indicator beforehand, remove the safety retainer on my anchor so it's ready to go, and transit through with the mainsail raised and genoa ready (for redundancy).
PS - My wife took the video - when I commented about the finger showing in the view she said she was aware of it but wanted a good grip - she was nervous about dropping the phone. OK :)
 
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TomY

Alden Forum Moderator
Jun 22, 2004
1,938
Alden 38' Challenger yawl Rockport Harbor
Monday leaving Woods Hole (against the current). Strong currents like this always make me uneasy. Whether it's Woods Hole Passage, The East River (NYC), the Cape Cod Canal, or Plum Gut -- I always check my fuel filter vacuum indicator beforehand, remove the safety retainer on my anchor so it's ready to go, and transit through with the mainsail raised and genoa ready (for redundancy).
PS - My wife took the video - when I commented about the finger showing in the view she said she was aware of it but wanted a good grip - she was nervous about dropping the phone. OK :)
From Canada to the Exumas, that short stretch of water gives me the most concern. I've read a few accounts of how it can ruin your day(and boat).

Thanks for the morning fright, Larry. :)
 
Jan 11, 2014
4,415
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
PS - My wife took the video - when I commented about the finger showing in the view she said she was aware of it but wanted a good grip - she was nervous about dropping the phone. OK :)
Larry, time to get your wife a Joby Grip Tight, a handy little device.

There is a growing trend, mostly among younger people, to lower their carbon footprint in life. Life includes recreation.

Once a new generation has the means for more recreation, will burning 10 to 20 gallons of fuel per hour be as appealing as it is today? I have trouble seeing that.

Is a sail renaissance possible in the future?
Could be, the energy crisis in the 70s helped to fuel the rapid growth of sailing in the 70s and 80s.
 
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Sep 25, 2018
142
Catalina Capri 22 Capri EXPO 14.2 1282 Serenity Too Stony Point
The east river is no place for a sailboat. Worked in the river in the late 60's and with lots of power was turned about many times by to eddy's at the Hell Gate, aptly named. Watched sail boats try to motor through with similar outcomes. Only at slack tide should one enter this tidal straight. (IMHO)
 
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Oct 26, 2008
4,171
Starwind 27 Barnegat, NJ
There is a growing trend, mostly among younger people, to lower their carbon footprint in life. Life includes recreation.

Once a new generation has the means for more recreation, will burning 10 to 20 gallons of fuel per hour be as appealing as it is today? I have trouble seeing that.

Is a sail renaissance possible in the future?
Absolutely, but there is also a growing trend among younger people in favor of Socialism. After they've been relieved of student debt and after they run out of their parent's and other people's money, they'll learn that there must be a source of INCOME! Then the sail renaissance has a chance! Hopefully, there will be enough whom are smart enough to short circuit that cycle. ;)
 
Jul 7, 2004
6,079
Hunter 30T Cheney, KS
We've had good turnout in the club's "Learn to Sail" program this season. Some, I'm sure will buy a boat. Some hopefully will join the club. I was on the dock washing Bella Luna when the instructors were giving a class a tour of the keelboats, explaining the different rigging arrangements etc and how it all works together. I was happy to invite them on board to give them an idea of what a sailboat feels like above and below deck and let their imaginations run with them. I got some very pleasant questions and comments from them. I'm optimistic for the future of sailing.
 
Oct 19, 2017
5,293
O'Day 19 Littleton, NH
Some of the new proposed technology to help reduce fuel use is not only encouraging, but fascinating.




Some actual real life pictures:


There is power to be had.

-Will (Dragonfly)
 
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Sep 11, 2017
183
Beneteau 373 Cape Cod
Monday leaving Woods Hole (against the current). Strong currents like this always make me uneasy. Whether it's Woods Hole Passage, The East River (NYC), the Cape Cod Canal, or Plum Gut -- I always check my fuel filter vacuum indicator beforehand, remove the safety retainer on my anchor so it's ready to go, and transit through with the mainsail raised and genoa ready (for redundancy).
PS - My wife took the video - when I commented about the finger showing in the view she said she was aware of it but wanted a good grip - she was nervous about dropping the phone. OK :)
I've been through 4 times just in the past month... probably will go through 4 or 5 times more this summer... and I'm ALWAYS on high-alert through there. Obviously I TRY to always time it exactly at slack tide, or very close to it, but life happens, and sometimes schedules aren't kept as intended, and I've seen it where the buoys are 1/2 buried in the water with current around 6 knots in there. The worst (and admittedly in hindsight foolish) was one time I had to get through where my speed through water at nearly full throttle was around 6kts, and our GPS speed over the ground sat at about 0.1 - 0.2kts... Not only is that nerve-frying, but also... the quarter-of-a-mile-or-so where the tide is strongest is an HOUR-LONG battle (or more) at that speed, trying not to veer off course for even 2 seconds, as that'll send you quickly in the wrong direction. Not good at all. All ended well, but I wouldn't recommend it (or attempt it again) like that. Yes... I also have anchor ready, genoa ready to go at a moment's notice there. Frequent fog and ferries passing through every 15 minutes or so add to the "fun". Worth noting: Transiting WITH a strong current is better than against, but only marginally... avoid that too. You're basically sailing down (or up) through river rapids.
 
Oct 19, 2017
5,293
O'Day 19 Littleton, NH
We navigated by oar through a narrows on the West side of Vinelhaven for an Outward Bound course. It was foggy and I got lucky and passed within 10 feet of the can I was aiming for. Not only was it hidden by fog, but it only popped up above the water by a few inches occasionally as the outgoing current dragged the can completely underwater. It was going our way or we would have had to wait a few hours for it to slack.

-Will (Dragonfly)
 
Jan 22, 2008
525
Hunter 340 Baytown TX
I'm hoping we're able to get the boat out on the bay for Friday Fireworks tomorrow night, just two more left for this year. These shots are from the last Friday in June, when dust from the Sahara was over a lot of the country. No photoshop, just straightened and cropped, hope to see and shoot another great sunset tomorrow.

IMG_E5659.JPG

HHFZE1244.JPG
 

dLj

Mar 23, 2017
660
Hunter 30 Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
Ebbs and tides in all things happen and are not predictable. But I do hope that sailing goes back up from where it has gone. I try as much as possible to show young folk the joys of sailing. But one drop of water in the ocean does not do much.

dj
 
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