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water in the hull

Oct 26, 2019
4
Oday daysailer Sacandaga
I am a new owner of a 70's Daysailer. I added a new plug to the transom and used the recommended sealer. I also replaced the two circle covers in the floor.
I had it moored all summer. When I trailered it out this fall I opened the transom plug. A tremendous amount of water started to drain and took forever.
I could not believe how much water I had been dragging around all summer!
How would all that water enter into that area? Only through the transom plug or do I have a crack in the fiberglass somewhere?
Thank you for any advice.
 
Oct 22, 2014
10,671
CAL 35 Cruiser Portland OR, moored EVERETT WA
How would all that water enter into that area?
Welcome Togasailer. Where there is a will water will find it’s way.
Did it rain last summer while you were away from the boat?
I suspect your 1970’s daysailer has a hole or crack that allowed water to seep into the hull. Boats, even new ones, are leak resistant not leak proof.
Requires us owners to be observant and empty the water on occasion.
 
Mar 29, 2017
362
Hunter 30t littlecreek
Your gonna have to rig up a way to flip boat over at home to take a look. a tree is best method its probably at the keel trunk
 
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SG

Feb 11, 2017
1,520
J/Boat J/160 Annapolis
I suppose, if it's on a trailer, you could fill it with a bit of water and find where some drains out?
 
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Jan 1, 2006
4,334
Slickcraft 26 Greenport, NY
That used to happen with my Bandit 15. It wasn't a problem trailering. But when I kept it in the water I would show up now and to find the boat sitting on the bottom - especially if there was a lot of rain. I would have to drag it up on shore and empty it. Both the cockpit and between the hull and liner. I found the solution in buying a boat with a self draining cockpit and a bilge pump with a float switch.
 
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Apr 3, 2019
354
Macgregor 26M P Cub Boo Mobile AL
My neighbor had a vacuum leak in his truck project that he couldn't find. I built a smoke machine that pumped pressurized smoke into the intake manifold and hoses. It confirmed a suspician we had and showed us leaks we hadn't suspected.

If your daysailer bilge is sealed otherwise, there's no reason you couldn't use pressurized smoke to find leaks in your boat. Obviously, if the construction is merely a liner, this may not give good information. Anyhow, there are chemical smoke squibbs you can buy that would be very safe. I used a soldering iron and mineral oil in a paint can, less safe, but no flame. A regulated LOW PRESSURE (less than 5psi), compressed air source pushes the smoke into the test enclosure - one of your circular access plates maybe. YouTube has several suggestions for smoke machine construction. I wouldn't encourage one that has an actual fire in it.

A leaf blower pumping into the bilge and soap bubbles could also be used if the inner liner is reasonably air tight.

Just spitballing alternatives to filling it with water while on a trailer. Be careful if you use water. The weight may damage your trailer if you use a lot of water. But, water works too.

As @jssailem points out, you need to check your bilge more often than once per summer. I would suggest every time you get in the boat, and every time you leave the boat. Although, you may have figured this out already...

Good luck!
 
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Oct 26, 2019
4
Oday daysailer Sacandaga
Welcome Togasailer. Where there is a will water will find it’s way.
Did it rain last summer while you were away from the boat?
I suspect your 1970’s daysailer has a hole or crack that allowed water to seep into the hull. Boats, even new ones, are leak resistant not leak proof.
Requires us owners to be observant and empty the water on occasion.
Yes it rained a lot. I had rigged up a small battery and bilge to pump out water as it was moored. All the rain rain water would sit in the back and would be removed. But of course it would not pump out the hull. So I was suspect as you said it seeped in from below. Thanks
 
Oct 26, 2019
4
Oday daysailer Sacandaga
My neighbor had a vacuum leak in his truck project that he couldn't find. I built a smoke machine that pumped pressurized smoke into the intake manifold and hoses. It confirmed a suspician we had and showed us leaks we hadn't suspected.

If your daysailer bilge is sealed otherwise, there's no reason you couldn't use pressurized smoke to find leaks in your boat. Obviously, if the construction is merely a liner, this may not give good information. Anyhow, there are chemical smoke squibbs you can buy that would be very safe. I used a soldering iron and mineral oil in a paint can, less safe, but no flame. A regulated LOW PRESSURE (less than 5psi), compressed air source pushes the smoke into the test enclosure - one of your circular access plates maybe. YouTube has several suggestions for smoke machine construction. I wouldn't encourage one that has an actual fire in it.

A leaf blower pumping into the bilge and soap bubbles could also be used if the inner liner is reasonably air tight.

Just spitballing alternatives to filling it with water while on a trailer. Be careful if you use water. The weight may damage your trailer if you use a lot of water. But, water works too.

As @jssailem points out, you need to check your bilge more often than once per summer. I would suggest every time you get in the boat, and every time you leave the boat. Although, you may have figured this out already...

Good luck!
wow... some good ideas. I think testing it on the trailer perhaps with water and soap bubbles might be a good solution. I could maybe flip it on the trailer and then pump through the transom drain. Thanks
 

Joe

Jun 1, 2004
6,832
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
Think about it. There's a reason drain plugs are installed in a boat. If it's stored on the trailer the drain is left open so rain water can escape. The boat's design and construction might allow for a lot of water entry and you could spend countless hours tracking them down and trying to correct them. Instead, you might consider investing in a cover to reduce the likelihood of water intrusion, or just commit to pulling it out of the water every few months, or after a strong rain, to simply let it drain.
 
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May 24, 2004
5,982
CC 30 South Florida
Remove the plug, pick up the tongue of the trailer and let it drain; that is why the plug is there for. Rain leaks, sea spray, leaking keel trunks and even wet bathing suits contribute to water in the hull.
 
Sep 25, 2018
142
Catalina Capri 22 Capri EXPO 14.2 1282 Serenity Too Stony Point
Left the cubby hatch ajar for ventilation like I do when the boat is covered. Catalina 14.2 Expo. Went sailing and the boat was a slug. Put it back on the boat lift and removed the drain plug and water flowed for a couple of hours. If it was windy the heel would have been 180 degrees. It was in Florida and I missed the thunder storm that filled the boat. I have put a new gasket on the opening and won't forget to secure the hatch after I take the cover off. The cockpit drained well though.
 
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Sep 11, 2017
183
Beneteau 373 Cape Cod
While it is OUT of the water, does water leak out anywhere? That's a decent test of leaks LOW in the hull. I was going to suggest seeing if the water was salt or fresh to determine if it came from below or above, but it looks like you're in freshwater territory... so no help there. You could seal/close up everything and hook a leaf blower up to the drain opening, and then spray the outside of the boat with soapy water and look for foam/bubbles... (bonus: your boat gets clean while you work) a spray bottle (like windex comes in) works well with a bit of dish soap in water.
 
Jun 2, 2004
1,755
Oday Day Sailer Wareham, MA
When you replaced the 2 inspection/bailing ports, did you be sure to use a bead of marine sealant (or at least Silicone) around the underside of the flanges? I had trouble with some water seeping in around those. Be sure the covers are fully screwed in too. Water can leak in to the cuddy around the wood (or on early ,1971-73 DS II models, the vinyl cover) cover over the cuddy opening. If there are any holes in the cuddy "floor" water can get into the bilge area, I had a crack in one of the drains that allows water in the cuddy to flow out into cockpit, letting water into the bilge. Are you on fresh Water or Salt? We saltwater sailors do have one advantage, easy to tell if water in the bilge came from rain or fro ma hull leak.... just taste it! I also had a leak in the joint between the hull and deck that let in some water while I was sailing, checking for any gaps along that joint/seam may find the leak.

One bit of advice, next year, each time that you go out sailing, it is recommended practice to always open the 2 inspection ports and check for water in the bilge, and pump/bail out any that you find. That way you get it out before it builds up to an unsafe level. Screw the ports closed again before sailing to prevent any water than gets into the cockpit from going into the bilge.
 

Attachments

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Jun 2, 2004
1,755
Oday Day Sailer Wareham, MA
View attachment 171498

Unless there is another Sacandaga? The salt only comes out of the shaker :^)))
View attachment 171499
Well, that was why I asked, I was not familiar with the location of Sacandaga, did not know it is a freshwater lake in NY. But my point was that IF the boat was in saltwater it is easier to tell whether the water was rainwater or had leaked in through the hull. The rest of my advice stands as useful no matter what the water tastes like.
 
Oct 26, 2019
4
Oday daysailer Sacandaga
When you replaced the 2 inspection/bailing ports, did you be sure to use a bead of marine sealant (or at least Silicone) around the underside of the flanges? I had trouble with some water seeping in around those. Be sure the covers are fully screwed in too. Water can leak in to the cuddy around the wood (or on early ,1971-73 DS II models, the vinyl cover) cover over the cuddy opening. If there are any holes in the cuddy "floor" water can get into the bilge area, I had a crack in one of the drains that allows water in the cuddy to flow out into cockpit, letting water into the bilge. Are you on fresh Water or Salt? We saltwater sailors do have one advantage, easy to tell if water in the bilge came from rain or fro ma hull leak.... just taste it! I also had a leak in the joint between the hull and deck that let in some water while I was sailing, checking for any gaps along that joint/seam may find the leak.

One bit of advice, next year, each time that you go out sailing, it is recommended practice to always open the 2 inspection ports and check for water in the bilge, and pump/bail out any that you find. That way you get it out before it builds up to an unsafe level. Screw the ports closed again before sailing to prevent any water than gets into the cockpit from going into the bilge.
I don't think I put any silicone or sealant around the floor ports. But I will this summer that's for sure! Thanks for the good advice.
 
Nov 4, 2019
1
O'Day Daysailer II Oliphant
Have the same issue with my '74 Daysailer which I bought new. In fact all my boats, power and sail, have gotten water in the bilge. Power boats all had/have automatic bilge pumps. I keep a hand pump in the cuddy of the DS and check the bilge after every rain or after sailing in heavy chop. I believe most of the water gets in through the centreboard trunk. I also keep a sponge handy to get out what the pump can't reach. One gets use to it and checking/pumping becomes habit. By the way, I sail on Lake Huron so it can get pretty wild at times.
 
Sep 29, 2013
23
Oday O'Day 222, O'Day 19 19- No Name Casco Bay, Falmouth, ME
Welcome to the group. I had a DaySailer III and had a similar problem. When left at my dock very little water, if any got into the boat. If I sailed, some would accumulate in the bilge. I finally took the boat off the trailer and pulled the centerboard. I found a small hole in the centerboard case just above the wedges that hold the centerboard in place. I ground out the hole to get a clean surface to bond to and epoxied the hole closed. I never had water in the bilge again. I'm sure I only got water in on one tack, but that really didn't matter, since I live on a narrow lake and I'm tacking all the time. Fun boat.