• Mobile App For Android Now Online!

    Download it here. The app is searchable in the Google Play Store under Sailboat Owners.

    Sorry iPhone/iPad users, we are still waiting on Apple. :(

    Click the X in the upper right corner to make this go away

Water in the hull - is that normal?

Status
Not open for further replies.

mark2

.
Dec 10, 2012
52
Hunter 18 Raleigh
Is it normal to get some amount of water in the hull cavity of a 170 after a routine sail of a few hours? When we take the plug out the back as we pull up the boat ramp there is always some water that drains out (a few cups, perhaps). I know there are wood back plates for the motor mount and maybe the mast step and rudder mount... worried about rotting them (see my previous post about the motor mount; not sure if that is due to any rot).

--Mark
 
Feb 26, 2010
259
Hunter 15 Fremantle, Western Australia
Is it a smallish amount of water that could be created via condensation? Launching a hull the size of a H170 that has been in the sun for a few hours into cold water might be producing a small amount of water I would believe. Next time you launch, make sure the hull is empty and then after you retrieve, catch the water in a graduated beaker to determine just how much water is getting in.
I'd also suggest that you crawl under the boat with a strong/bright light and inspect the centreboard case/hull juncture for any cracks in the skin.
 

txjim

.
Sep 4, 2007
154
Hunter 170 Grapevine Lake, TX
You are not alone, I tend to take on water beyond simple condensation as well. I recently had the boat out 2 days in a slip and 5 days hard sailing. I don't think I took on any water in the slip (I installed an inspection port on one of the vertical surfaces) but had to pump throughout the trip, probably 5 gallons total.

We only have a few below-the-waterline and close-to-the-waterline areas to consider. Any submerged cracks in the plastic are likely not an issue as this is simply plastic skin over fiberglass for the hull.

Without weight onboard we only have the rudder bracket screws and the seam connecting the upper cap and hull in the rudder trunk. (why this was designed to be an underwater join is beyond me.) With weight onboard or while sailing, we also have the outside upper deck/hull join in the stern and, possibly on the leeward side. In the trip I mentioned above, choppy bays and weight in the boat kept the stern join underwater for long periods. I don't think it's the hull join in the centerboard trunk as I did not notice any leaking while in the slip. Same for leaks around the centerboard bracket hardware.

My plans over the winter are to inspect and reseal the areas mentioned. This will include removal/replacement of the rubrail and I have no expectations that the original will come off easily or intact. I have this crazy idea of dumping several inches of water in the hull and applying pressure to force water through the leaking areas but can picture the boat inflating like a balloon if I get impatient with the pressure!
 
Last edited:
Nov 5, 2012
37
Catalina 36 Mumbai
That is very little water. It is perfectly normal and the same usually happens with my boat too. However, do a check and try to find out from where the water enters. It mostly enters from the bonding between the hull and the deck.
 

txjim

.
Sep 4, 2007
154
Hunter 170 Grapevine Lake, TX
That is very little water. It is perfectly normal and the same usually happens with my boat too. However, do a check and try to find out from where the water enters. It mostly enters from the bonding between the hull and the deck.
Uh, yes it is a lot of water and it is most certainly not normal.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.