Talk me into a Catalina

Tedd

.
Jul 25, 2013
465
Between Boats near Vancouver, BC
The Catalina 310 looks really nice, but it's probably out of our price range. How does it compare to the older 30s? It looks like the 310 has more sail area, but cabin-wise they seem to be similar.
 
Nov 8, 2007
1,396
Hunter 27_75-84 Sandusky Harbor Marina, Ohio
The Admiral and I have cruised our h27 for 2-4 weeks in Lakes Erie and Huron a number of times. We know we could sail her indefinitely. My key criteria for size are:

- comfortable bunks for both of us. We love our v-berth, although we’ve had to learn to keep our feet apart as we sleep. Try the bunks together before you buy!
- headroom in the cabin. We have a little over 6 feet, and I’m about 5’ 10”.
- usable head with adequate capacity. Ours will go 5 days between pump outs.

I think any Catalina boat model in your size range would rate good on any other criteria of importance.

Good lick with your search!
 
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leo310

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Dec 15, 2006
452
Catalina Catlina 310 Campbell River BC
The 30 is the same but has a V berth not a island bed. Cost wise yes the 310 cost more than a 30 by 40k if not more as you can get a nice 30 for 20+k.
 
Jan 5, 2017
2,170
Beneteau First 38 Lyall Harbour Saturna Island
25-28 big enough to be comfortable for that kind of cruising?
Our last boat was a E-28+. Bev and I did a 12 week cruise to the mid-coast with it. It was great but this great deal came up so now we have a Bene first 38. Lots more comfort for our old age.
 
Jul 27, 2011
4,530
Bavaria 38E Alamitos Bay
My wife and I sailed our Pearson 30 all around SW Florida for 6 yr visiting anchorages, and then to various destinations departing Long Beach, CA where we stayed aboard several nights to more than a week at a time, etc., for another 5 yr. A Catalina 30 is a larger boat, probably more comfortable. Our most frequent companion boat sailing with us in FL was an Islander 30, the Bahama 30 model. All these boats were more than adequate in accommodations for a couple for extended periods.

However, for long trips where you will likely often face contrary conditions, such as the trip you mention (post #75) I couldn’t recommended anything smaller than 32 ft. This is due to the difficulty of small boats meeting such conditions. Remember, in the Salish Sea and other points such as in the Johnstone Strait, etc., the prevailing conditions are either from the northwest or the southeast. Those are largely your travel directions. Good days in the Sea—heading NW on a good SE wind and flooding tide during daylight. Turn that around (NW wind and ebbing tide), and you are likely to have a slow, perhaps miserable day in a small sail boat. Wait it all out for better travel conditions—maybe. Prepare for the long haul. Read Raban’s Passage to Juneau for insight.

Summer of 2017 we were chartering a Hanse 495 out of Vancouver. On our return from the Octopus Islands we stayed a night in Secret Cove. The weather report for the morning of our departure from there was SE winds near 25 kt, gusting higher, 4-ft wind waves at the mouth of a pass we wished to use. Our travel direction was of course SE heading back to Vancouver. Just before and as we were hauling up the anchor a few “small” boats, probably in the 35-ft range, came pouring into the anchorage. Quite a sight. A crew on one of them when passing close shouted: “You should be okay out there in that” (referring to the Hanse). We were, but it was a rough ride until the wind abated later that afternoon. That was our 5th charter in BC.

This past summer we crewed on a friend’s 45-ft Hunter CC with full enclosure. Our leg was Nanaimo to Echo Bay, the Broughtons. We had to spend a few hours in the Johnstone Strait in 22 kt (where we were) on the nose heading NW, so we were motoring. It’s hard to imagine a 30 footer w/o enclosure out there in that doing what we were doing. Cold, wet, pounding—a little on edge—with poor VMG. Obviously better to stay holed up another day or two if in a small boat. Come out when the conditions improve. A Beneteau 40 was out there with us; a Tartan 34 remained another day in shelter.
 
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Tedd

.
Jul 25, 2013
465
Between Boats near Vancouver, BC
Kings:

Thanks, that's all great advice. I've been reading Best Anchorages of the Inside Passage to get some insight into the planning required for a trip through areas such as Johnstone Strait, but I wasn't aware of Passage to Juneau. I'll definitely read that, too.

On another thread I asked about pilothouses, and it definitely seems as though that's a big advantage in the PNW, especially if you plan to sail all year round, as we do. It's too bad Catalina never made one. But I suppose a fully-enclosed cockpit is a pretty good alternative.

Tedd
 
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Aug 1, 2011
3,959
Catalina 270 255 Wabamun. Welcome to the marina
Until it's August with no wind and you are emulating a slab of hot ded cow on the bbq.
 

Tedd

.
Jul 25, 2013
465
Between Boats near Vancouver, BC
Well I think the idea is that you can remove the cockpit enclosure in the summer. Although, in the PNW, you might not even do that!
 
Nov 8, 2007
1,396
Hunter 27_75-84 Sandusky Harbor Marina, Ohio
Our solution for opposing weather/tides is to build enough extra days in our cruise plan to allow us to wait for good conditions.

In an archipelago, our other strategy is to change the next destination to fit the wind/tides. This doesn’t work if we are sailing the length of Lake Huron to get to the North Channel! But both strategies served us well cruising the Lake Erie Islands last summer. Over 17 days, we sailed 8 legs, and all but one were great sails.
 
Oct 3, 2011
788
Anam Cara Catalina 310 Hull #155 155 Lake Erie/Catawba Island
There are lots of people that sail a Catalina 22 or 25 for extended periods, without killing each other or when back immediately putting the boat and house and car up for sale to never go there again.
It is what suits you and your significant others personality.
We could have sailed our 25 for the rest of our lives but we wanted to sail longer and to further destinations with more amenities-queen size bed in the V berth longer range on the engine-just in case-so the lesson here is a balance as to what your needs are VS. Wants. when we were just talking about the 310 we had that SERIOUS-What do you think/where do we see us
discussion.
I have sailed with my buddy for years aboard his Catalina 30 and he single hands it when I am not along so he is comfortable
with it. He sails to lots of destinations by himself.
We have met "David in Sandusky" at a couple of destinations and he and his wife are VERY comfortable and Happy aboard their Hunter 27. Its what makes you happy. We have also made our boat OURS, we have added a bimini and Dodger, replaced the lights to all LED, and other upgrades.
There is alot to be said about chartering or sailing with friends on their boats.
Also just looking at boats and picking what you like or dont.
Just some thoughts...
 
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Aug 1, 2011
3,959
Catalina 270 255 Wabamun. Welcome to the marina
That's probably the more accurate sentiment, in that the boat works for you as adversed to what the name on the side says. The differences are not as dramatic between 30 footers as, say, a domestic 1 ton and a Yugo, but there are certainly things that only spending time on the boat will become obvious that don't work so well for you. That's why chartering makes so much sense, it can be like an extended test drive.
 
Jul 3, 2018
29
Macgregor 26D Trailer Sailor
I’d shop Alberg, Pacific Seacraft, and Island Packet simply because they are more seaworthy than the others mentioned and IMO far better quality.
 
Aug 1, 2011
3,959
Catalina 270 255 Wabamun. Welcome to the marina
Simple. To suggest that any brand is more seaworthy than another is to do it to the detriment of the rest. Personally, I don't particularly agree with the logic, and as a Catalina owner, I take issue with that kind of unfounded, unscientific, suggestive statement. People who sail in paper thin fiberglass probably shouldn't throw things. Just sayin.

And no, I won't be talking Ted into anything. He's capable of making his own decisions, based on his own needs.
 
May 25, 2012
3,839
john alden caravelle 42 sturgeon bay, wis
ahhhh... grasshopper, you ask for wisdom. i'll give you some. how have i acquired such wisdom you might ask. well, 60 years sailing sailboats. well over 1,000,000.00 miles at sea. highly trained.
so? seaworthy? take your blue water designs and your coastal cruiser designs and your trailer water ballast designs and select a few of each then take them 100 miles off shore and anchor them for one year. yep, just leave them hang on the hook and let nature take it's course. grasshopper, they will all be there bobbing up and down and be just fine. they are all strong enough. they are all built plenty strong. i have never heard of any these boats just breaking up. so, your seaworthy statement is not valid.

now grasshopper, why then are these different designs so different. why are they built with different options? cause every sailor has a uniquely different dream on how to utilize these toys. one design does not fit all.
over the years the sales numbers of each style of sailing will show how most enjoy this hobby.

for the OP. catalinas , and others, clearly have been designed for how a huge group use these toys in the real world. blue water vessels are much less popular for how most actually use these toys.

they are all plenty strong, so pick a design that fits your dreams. these are toys, not work vessels.

fellas, that was internet polite, right? :)
 
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