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Storing furled spinnaker

AaronD

.
Aug 10, 2014
538
Catalina 22 9874 Newberg, OR / Olympia, WA
Continuing my pattern of dumb rookie questions that are probably answered somewhere: Is it OK to store a spinnaker furled on its torsion rope in its bag? Or do I need to unroll and fold every time we drop it? If it's OK to leave it furled, is there a limit on how long one should do that? (I'd plan to fold it for winter storage, but if I can leave it coiled in its furl for a few days between usages, that would sure make daily rigging quicker.

In my case it's a 1.5oz "Cruising Code Zero" if that matters, but I suspect the answer is the same for all chutes.

I'd love it if @DrJudyB were to chime in - the sail is from her (and it looks great!). I was about to email Hyde directly, but thought any info or discussion might be of general interest.
 

weinie

.
Sep 6, 2010
1,297
Jeanneau 349 port washington, ny
Roll it up and put it in the bag by bending it over every 3 or 4 feet or so (the length of the bag your sailmaker should provide you with.) You can leave it that way all winter. I have some high tech code 0 cloth and never had any issue.

Also have a nylon spinnaker on a furler I store the same way. That definitely doesn't matter as much since most spinnakers that aren't on a furler are just crammed into a bag anyway and not folded.
 
Jan 11, 2014
7,853
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
For any fabric it is best to not have sharp creases and folds. The sharp bends weaken the fibers. While stuffing a spinnaker in a bag will yields some of those sharp folds, the pattern will be random and less problematic. The stiffer the fabric, the more damage will be done with sharp creases.
 
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weinie

.
Sep 6, 2010
1,297
Jeanneau 349 port washington, ny
For any fabric it is best to not have sharp creases and folds. The sharp bends weaken the fibers. While stuffing a spinnaker in a bag will yields some of those sharp folds, the pattern will be random and less problematic. The stiffer the fabric, the more damage will be done with sharp creases.
But the logistics of removing and reinstalling a sail on top down furler basically negate the convenience of having a furler in the first place.
 
Jan 11, 2014
7,853
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
But the logistics of removing and reinstalling a sail on top down furler basically negate the convenience of having a furler in the first place.
Rolling a sail does not cause creases, that's why many competitive sailors roll their sails and don't fold them.

Leave the sail on the furler, when it is stored, just don't fold it the same way every time and don't crease it. The sail should be fine.
 

weinie

.
Sep 6, 2010
1,297
Jeanneau 349 port washington, ny
Rolling a sail does not cause creases, that's why many competitive sailors roll their sails and don't fold them.

Leave the sail on the furler, when it is stored, just don't fold it the same way every time and don't crease it. The sail should be fine.
agreed. i thought you were saying OP should take the sail off the furler.

For what it's worth though, bending the rolled up 'sausage' into the bag does put nasty bends in it unlike when you roll up a mainsail around the boom. However, I never, after several years, noticed any issue with my laminate or nylon sails.
 

AaronD

.
Aug 10, 2014
538
Catalina 22 9874 Newberg, OR / Olympia, WA
Thanks for the advice. I'll try not to bend it too tight in the bag, but won't worry too much about it otherwise.