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Small O'Day 20 mod

Jul 30, 2019
36
O'Day 20 Stuart Lake, BC
When I bought her last summer, the 6'3" previous owner told me of his struggles getting the battery out for winter storage, from its location at the stern end of the port quarter berth. When I got in there myself, though a lot less than 6'3" I did not feel happy. Rather like Count Dracula going for a nap.

port quarter berth.JPG

I decided that some easier access would be desirable, so online I went, of course, and found that hatch lids can be very expensive. Then again, I discovered a line made by Amarine. I ordered one that was 17.25" by 12.4", with an opening of 14" by 9.5", at only $42 Canadian dollars, with free shipping from UNoHoo. The reviews were very positive, and when it arrived it certainly seemed well made and robust. Easy to install on butyl tape, and now I have access not only to the battery, but what seems to be the original factory wiring, done on the Spaghetti Principle..... but at least now I can get at it without having to wriggle down a narrow dark tunnel and turn my multifocals upside down to try and figure out what I am looking at. A big convenience, and one I recommend highly. Note that I decided to mount the cover on the vertical surface rather than on the cockpit seat surface, where I think it would make seating less comfortable. I also could stick a tote at the stern end, though I think I'll make something a little better to fit there.

Bob

port quarter compartment access 01.JPG


port quarter compartment access 02.JPG


battery and wiring access 01.JPG


amarine hatch specs.JPG
 
Oct 19, 2017
5,517
O'Day 19 Littleton, NH
Now that's cool! Thanks for posting that. I'll need to do something like that myself, at some point.

-Will (Dragonfly)
 
Sep 29, 2015
58
Oday 222 Lake N ockamixon, pa
Great idea! One thing I noticed is, there are no circuit breakers, that I can see. ?
 
Jul 30, 2019
36
O'Day 20 Stuart Lake, BC
Thank you, Mr. Mayhem. The inside is clean anyway! Cleaning the exterior surfaces will come when I get the furnace fixed, hopefully this week. The building furnace, that is. This is the Frozen North and washing does not go well sub-zero. I wish I knew more of its history, but it seems not to have had anything catastrophic occur in its 45+ years. Sadly it now belongs to a complete idiot.

rschuss, it would seem that the limited number of loads are all fused in-line. I believe so anyway. Since all the wiring except for the ICOM VHF unit runs between skins, I think that it is original, although I am willing to be corrected. It would have been difficult to rewire like that.

Bob
 
Last edited:
Sep 29, 2015
58
Oday 222 Lake N ockamixon, pa
Between the hull and headliner material, I found the wiring to the cabin lights and the mast lights. With a fully charged battery, 12.6 volts, I get a large voltage drop at the lights, maybe 11 volts available. I haven't investigated; but either there is a voltage drop in the wiring, circuit breaker or both. Since I replaced the bulbs with LED's it doesn't matter much; but I ran separate wiring for my inverter, which is installed at the center bulkhead. I attached the cable to the hull under the port birth. I also ran a separate power cable to my GPS, behind the rear bulkhead, at the starboard side of the companionway. The transducer is buried in wax all the way forward down in the bottom of the bow. That cable I ty-wrapped along the hull and brought it through the liner with a small hole and routed it up and over behind the bulkhead to the GPS. Mine is a O'Day 222. It would be nice if they had used a plastic pipe and routed all the wiring through that from the battery through the hull.
 
Jul 30, 2019
36
O'Day 20 Stuart Lake, BC
Between the hull and headliner material, I found the wiring to the cabin lights and the mast lights. With a fully charged battery, 12.6 volts, I get a large voltage drop at the lights, maybe 11 volts available. I haven't investigated; but either there is a voltage drop in the wiring, circuit breaker or both. Since I replaced the bulbs with LED's it doesn't matter much; but I ran separate wiring for my inverter, which is installed at the center bulkhead. I attached the cable to the hull under the port birth. I also ran a separate power cable to my GPS, behind the rear bulkhead, at the starboard side of the companionway. The transducer is buried in wax all the way forward down in the bottom of the bow. That cable I ty-wrapped along the hull and brought it through the liner with a small hole and routed it up and over behind the bulkhead to the GPS. Mine is a O'Day 222. It would be nice if they had used a plastic pipe and routed all the wiring through that from the battery through the hull.
I am no expert on electrickery, but I wonder if it might indeed matter with LEDs. Firstly because your LEDs might have a minimum voltage for functioning, but presumably you already found that they worked. Secondly I would want to talk to an electrician to ascertain whether the LEDs trying to draw a higher current might lead to the wires heating up. Like an electric toaster. Pity to toast one's boat!

Bob
 
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Likes: Will Gilmore
Sep 29, 2015
58
Oday 222 Lake N ockamixon, pa
Light Emitting Diodes, LED's, consume very little current, perhaps in the area of 20 milliamps, compared to 2000 milliamps of a regular lamp. They also can be pulsed at higher current levels for short intervals of time to make them brighter. That's the reason most folks are changing to LED's; they are very efficient. Another way to express it is Power=volts x amps. For example, a regular incandescent light it's 12 volts x 2 amps = 24 watts of power. For an LED it's 12 volts x .02 amps = 0.24 watts of power. By the way .02 amps = 20 milliamps. Also it only takes 1 volt to excite an LED. Yeah there's electrickery in it. Go for it!
 
Jul 30, 2019
36
O'Day 20 Stuart Lake, BC
Light Emitting Diodes, LED's, consume very little current, perhaps in the area of 20 milliamps, compared to 2000 milliamps of a regular lamp. They also can be pulsed at higher current levels for short intervals of time to make them brighter. That's the reason most folks are changing to LED's; they are very efficient. Another way to express it is Power=volts x amps. For example, a regular incandescent light it's 12 volts x 2 amps = 24 watts of power. For an LED it's 12 volts x .02 amps = 0.24 watts of power. By the way .02 amps = 20 milliamps. Also it only takes 1 volt to excite an LED. Yeah there's electrickery in it. Go for it!
A good explanation. No toasted boat. I'll toast to that.

Bob