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Sail Storage

Nov 12, 2008
9
Oday 23 Lake Red Rock
I have a new sail pack for the main. After the boat comes out of the lake the boom gets stored in my garage. Is there any opinion about leaving the main attached to the boom zipped up in the pack - or should I take it off and bag it? Same with the headsail: what about leaving it on the roller furler track wrapped up in its sunbrella? Mice got into my old sails stored in the garage. Is there any advice about rodent control. Would mothballs damage the dacron? Thanks in advance.
 
Nov 14, 2016
18
Hunter 30 (1978) Milwaukee, WI
Not sure how much difficulty that adds to try to attach the boom with the additional weight and bulk of the main on it.
 
Nov 12, 2008
9
Oday 23 Lake Red Rock
Oh, I hadn't even considered reattaching the boom in the spring! Thanks for that heads up. I'd probably not be looking for a shortcut and just take disassemble everything.
 

SG

.
Feb 11, 2017
1,670
J/Boat J/160 Annapolis
I'd take it off, make sure it's dry, check the tell tails, check the stitching and reef points, etc. -- then I'd fold the sail and put it someplace it will be dry, won't get bugs in it, etc. If the garage stays dry, then that should work (but sometimes, depending on what's going on, the garage is only "relatively" dry ;^))) .
 
Nov 14, 2016
18
Hunter 30 (1978) Milwaukee, WI
My guess is that folded sails kept out of the elements would hold up the best over time but I guess that depends on what the mice are doing to them. Maybe the mice can be dissuaded by elevation or multiple layers of bags?
 
Nov 12, 2008
9
Oday 23 Lake Red Rock
Hey, it's Iowa! It's not only dry but it's also frozen. But this year sails will not only be carefully checked, flaked and put in their bags - I think they'll also be in those big plastic boxes - maybe with some Bounce sheets. I sure was hoping to be able to leave the jib on the forestay and lashed to the mask when the boat's on the hard but that's probably not a good idea. Does anyone have experience with this?
 
Jan 11, 2014
5,933
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
Leaving a sail exposed to the winter elements, leaves a sail exposed to repeated freeze/thaw cycles and lots of moisture, not to mention wind and sun. None of that is good for sail cloth or the sunbrella UV protection. Taking the jib down, folding it and putting back up takes what, maybe an hour tops?

As for the critters, lots of Decon around the storage area, maybe add a mouser cat.
 
Jan 1, 2006
5,016
Slickcraft 26 Greenport, NY
When I had the attic for it, I hung plywood sheets from the rafters and put the sail bags on them. And, I used lots of mouse traps. That all worked pretty well. No mildew. No chewing. If properly folded the sails don't take up that much room.
 

DougM

.
Jul 24, 2005
1,893
Beneteau 323 Manistee, MI
In my opinion, it is foolhardy to leave the jib exposed on the furler. Blizzard conditions could tear it loose and rip it to shreds in a matter of hours.

For winter storage, I have always removed, folded or rolled, and bagged my sails. I have the advantage of a garage with a finished interior and I hang the sail bags from hooks in the rafters.
I have been fortunate not to have had rodent damage even when I lived in farm country (and I happen to have a cat).
 
Nov 12, 2008
9
Oday 23 Lake Red Rock
You good folks have convinced me. Thanks. I can easily hang sail bags from hooks on the rafters in the garage where they will be out of the elements and away from any rodents. There they can (literally) hang around and wait for the joy of getting back on the boat and back to work in the spring.
 
Aug 13, 2012
524
Catalina 270 Ottawa
Not sure how much difficulty that adds to try to attach the boom with the additional weight and bulk of the main on it.
It is not that bad. Of course, you have to make sure that you have full an unobstructed access to the gooseneck (it takes some practice). And you probably want to have someone helping you. it is a bit of a handful doing it alone (three hands would help).
 
Nov 12, 2008
9
Oday 23 Lake Red Rock
You're right about the three hands. I'm pretty sure that a couple of us could manage, it's just an O'Day 23 and pretty straightforward. If the lazy jacks weren't secured anyway the sail pack sides would just hang listlessly out of the way of the gooseneck. I usually attach the topping lift and then go to work on that pin that holds the boom to the mast. You're making me think - taking the mainsail off is smart but I might not take the sail pack off. That raises the further question of running the lazy jacks up through the blocks up above the spreaders. It's a keel stepped mast and requires a crane to raise it. Hmmm, messenger lines while it still lying in the cradles?? Just when I think I know how my boat works something new comes along :)

Thanks!
 
Jan 11, 2014
5,933
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
You're right about the three hands. I'm pretty sure that a couple of us could manage, it's just an O'Day 23 and pretty straightforward. If the lazy jacks weren't secured anyway the sail pack sides would just hang listlessly out of the way of the gooseneck. I usually attach the topping lift and then go to work on that pin that holds the boom to the mast. You're making me think - taking the mainsail off is smart but I might not take the sail pack off. That raises the further question of running the lazy jacks up through the blocks up above the spreaders. It's a keel stepped mast and requires a crane to raise it. Hmmm, messenger lines while it still lying in the cradles?? Just when I think I know how my boat works something new comes along
With the sail off of the boom, attaching it should be a 1 person job. As you suggest, attach the topping lift to support the weight, then go forward and fiddle with the goose neck. That's what I did on my Tanzer 22, the Sabre 30, and do on my Sabre 362. Take your time, it can be done.

Yes, run some messenger lines for the Lazyjacks while the mast is down. All you need is some cheap line, mason's line would work, to pull the lazy jacks back up.

Bending on the mainsail can also be a one person job. Two people make it a little quicker, but one can do it. Attach the foot to the boom, then raise the main. Have all the parts and pieces in your pocket. The only tricky part is putting in the track stopper to keep the sail from falling out of the mast groove. Raise the last slug past the opening, then step on the halyard tail to keep the sail from dropping while you put the stopper in. Easy Peasy.

The only job that is challenging for one person is bending on the jib in a furler. The problem is feeding the luff into the groove. While there are feeders you can buy, it almost always requires some one to help feed the sail into the groove.
 
Nov 12, 2008
9
Oday 23 Lake Red Rock
You're explaining my experience with the mainsail exactly. And, you're right, it's easier with two sailors but can be done by one. Last year I got my brand new (read "stiff") headsail bent onto the furler - and the breeze was blowing - by myself. That required feeding the sail with both hands while holding the halyard with my teeth and inching the sail (which, of course, wanted to flog and fail about) painfully slowly up the track. But it has been such a joy all summer long that I have entirely forgotten the struggle to get it bent on.

Three sailboats. Sounds like a dream. In addition to the O'Day 23 I have a 15' Chrysler Man-O-War: no halyards, one sheet, one sail. It's quick and fun - but good only in warm weather!
 
Jan 11, 2014
5,933
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
Three sailboats. Sounds like a dream.
Owned them mostly sequentially. There was a too long overlap with the 30 and 362, but that has passed, finally. Down to 1 sailboat (well, 2 if you count the Flying Scot in the backyard waiting for its restoration), 3 canoes, and a small RIB. With never enough time to use them all.
 
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