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Running main halyard to cockpit / 18.5

MHJ

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Jan 31, 2021
12
Hunter 18.5 Logan Martin / BSC
Hello; I found some old posts about running the main halyard on an 18.5 through a block at the base of mast, then through a deck organizer or cheek block to a cam cleat and winch. I can't find photos; does anyone have pictures of their rig? I don't want to take my winch off the mast, so I guess I'll buy one and install. I'd appreciate any tips. Thanks, Michael Johnson
 
Feb 26, 2004
21,898
Catalina 34 224 Maple Bay, BC, Canada
On my C22, I installed a standup block at the base of the mast and a cheek block to turn the line aft. I didn't bother with a sheetstopper, just used a cleat on the coachroof, no winch. Even on windy SF Bay I could handle the mainsail and keep luff tension by sweating the line at the cleat.
 
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MHJ

.
Jan 31, 2021
12
Hunter 18.5 Logan Martin / BSC
On my C22, I installed a standup block at the base of the mast and a cheek block to turn the line aft. I didn't bother with a sheetstopper, just used a cleat on the coachroof, no winch. Even on windy SF Bay I could handle the mainsail and keep luff tension by sweating the line at the cleat.
So you don't even need a winch? I will try it first with the bringing it to a rope clutch. I can always decide to add a winch later, if needed, but I may not. Thanks!
 

Joe

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Jun 1, 2004
7,413
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
A cam cleat positioned so you could employ an existing sheet winch would be simpler, as SFbay suggested. Rope clutch may be too much, since you have to go to the cabin top to release it.....or to engage it for that matter. Running your expensive halyard cordage through clutch jaws when hoisting will quickly damage it.... not to mention make it much harder to raise by hand. A cam cleat allows you to manage the line from almost anywhere in the cockpit. Just my 2 cents.
 

MHJ

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Jan 31, 2021
12
Hunter 18.5 Logan Martin / BSC
A cam cleat positioned so you could employ an existing sheet winch would be simpler, as SFbay suggested. Rope clutch may be too much, since you have to go to the cabin top to release it.....or to engage it for that matter. Running your expensive halyard cordage through clutch jaws when hoisting will quickly damage it.... not to mention make it much harder to raise by hand. A cam cleat allows you to manage the line from almost anywhere in the cockpit. Just my 2 cents.
Thanks, that makes perfect sense. A cam cleat makes much better sense.
 
Feb 26, 2004
21,898
Catalina 34 224 Maple Bay, BC, Canada
A cam cleat makes much better sense.
Not necessarily. Cam cleats are good for lines that need to be readjusted often or for lightly loaded lines that are ser&forget, like lazy jacks for example. I submit that a halyard isn't one of these. A properly sized sheetstopper (clutch) shouldn't "eat" line/rope - I've had seven clutches on my 33 year old boat, mine for 24 of those, still working fine, line & all.
My point about bringing a halyard back on a small boat is that keeping luff tension is pretty easy because the forces are simply not that much. We are talking about an 18 foot boat here, folks. I did it on my Catalina 22 on windy SF Bay, no clutch and no winch. Sweating the line off a cleat is all it needed. If "true luff" :) was desired, bring the mainsail up by hand and add a cunningham, which could be 1:1 on a boat that size.
Trying to save @MHJ on unnecessary hardware, that's all.

If anything needed mechanical assist it would be the jib halyard, not the main.
 
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MHJ

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Jan 31, 2021
12
Hunter 18.5 Logan Martin / BSC
I appreciate all the helpful responses. It's gives me things to think about. Many thanks
 

MHJ

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Jan 31, 2021
12
Hunter 18.5 Logan Martin / BSC
Swivel cam clear over fixed one position. Winch unnecessary Picture of mast base please
I will have to take a photo the next time I go to the boat. I had to change the foot out last Spring, so I now have a foot with several pre-fitted holes for blocks.
 

bzano

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Jun 3, 2004
14
Hunter 18.5 Lake Hopatcong, NJ
I have a Hunter 18.5, 1988 vintage and I ran both the main and jib halyards from blocks (sheeves) on the base of the mast through a fairlead and over to a cheek block. This would turn the line 90 degrees to another set of fairleads to a spinlock camcleat mounted on the cabin roof. Did this several years ago and this year and ran the jib halyard on the port side through the same arrangement. Works fine for me as I keep the boat in a slip for the season. I did for the first time trailer my boat up to Lake George NY in August. All good.
 

Attachments

Jun 8, 2004
8,863
-na -NA Anywhere USA
@bzano

Did you simply screw in the fasteners into the deck using wood screws, thru bolt or drill and tap into encapsulated aluminum plates embedded in the fiberglass deck?
 

bzano

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Jun 3, 2004
14
Hunter 18.5 Lake Hopatcong, NJ
For the main halyard, I used machine screws and nuts with sealer
On the jib/genoa side used woodscrews with silicone sealer. All good.
 

MHJ

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Jan 31, 2021
12
Hunter 18.5 Logan Martin / BSC
I have a Hunter 18.5, 1988 vintage and I ran both the main and jib halyards from blocks (sheeves) on the base of the mast through a fairlead and over to a cheek block. This would turn the line 90 degrees to another set of fairleads to a spinlock camcleat mounted on the cabin roof. Did this several years ago and this year and ran the jib halyard on the port side through the same arrangement. Works fine for me as I keep the boat in a slip for the season. I did for the first time trailer my boat up to Lake George NY in August. All good.
Thank you, much appreciated!