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Replacing Aft Cabin Bulkhead in H306

Jun 25, 2004
282
Hunter 306 Pasadena MD
Next on my list of pandemic projects: replacing the bulkhead (removable panel, really) in the aft cabin of our Hunter 306. This is the 2' x 4' panel which is removed to access all the cr$^*%#p in the stern: holding tank, fuel tank, macerator, wiring spaghetti. It's only held on with 2 screws. But the bottom edge has totally delaminated from sitting in seepage from the rear hull/deck joint.

Anyway, I bought a 2'x4' piece of 1/2" teak faced marine plywood and a couple of strips of teak for the trim on each side which keeps it even with the permanently mounted plywood on the left and right sides. Here's the new (unfinished) and old panels:
plywood.jpeg


Cutting it to match and adding the trim strips will be fairly easy, but I'm unsure of how to finish it, other than the fact that I will certainly seal all the edges and the back side with some sort of polyurethane. I was thinking of maybe just using teak oil on the finished side, but this might be a bad idea. Leaning towards Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane. I can't see the point of staining it, as it will be darker naturally when sealed, and frankly, you can barely see the panel: it's at the stern of a very dark and cave-like aft cabin, in which we sleep from side to side. Suggestions welcome.

Jay
 
Jan 11, 2014
7,715
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
Take a scrap piece and try different solutions, pick the one you like best.

Finishes that seal the wood and provide a smooth surface are easier to keep clean and less friendly to mold and mildew.
 
Dec 19, 2006
5,727
Hunter 36 Punta Gorda
Did you fix the leak.
I had a 2001 290 really same boat and found a leak at the stern joint allowing water in mostly
when motoring when the stern pushes down and allowing leaking at the joint.
 
May 27, 2004
1,695
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
I would opt for penetrating epoxy on both sides (2 coats on the edges and backside)
Vs. urethane. It costs about the same, you'll still see a wood finish on the inside,
and you won't have to worry about the finish chipping when it's
removed/knocked around/reinstalled.
Oh Yeah, and what Seadaddler said!
 
Jun 25, 2004
282
Hunter 306 Pasadena MD
Did you fix the leak.
I had a 2001 290 really same boat and found a leak at the stern joint allowing water in mostly
when motoring when the stern pushes down and allowing leaking at the joint.
Not yet, but I plan to! Having spent too much time horizontal in the aft cabin over the past week, including once in a rain storm, I have seen either 2 or 3 hull/deck joint leaks in that area. I plan to pull off the rub rail along the entire stern, goop up the joint with 4200, and reattach the rub rail. In the past, I have also had some sort of leak onto the ceiling panel, but I think that may have only been when I was washing the boat with a hose and soap. The ceiling panel was completely dry in the rain storm.

I would opt for penetrating epoxy on both sides (2 coats on the edges and backside)
Vs. urethane. It costs about the same, you'll still see a wood finish on the inside,
and you won't have to worry about the finish chipping when it's
removed/knocked around/reinstalled.
Oh Yeah, and what Seadaddler said!
What brand/type of penetrating epoxy are you talking about, please?
 
Apr 14, 2009
736
Sabre 28 NH
I replaced the main cabin bulkheads with the same material. I used Watco oil in cherry flavor, blends right in with the old teak.
 
Jan 11, 2014
7,715
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
Regular two part epoxy works as well.
There is nothing terribly exotic about penetrating epoxy. Regular epoxy will work. There are 2 tricks to making it work well.

1. Warm the wood. This will expel a lot of air locked in the wood and as the wood cools it will suck the epoxy into its structure. By warm, I mean around 100°F. Check the West System website, I'm pretty sure they have more information on this.

2. Warm the Expoxy. Not hot, just enough to make it thinner. Set the epoxy in a hot water bath and use the slow hardener. You will have to work faster because the cure time will be shorter.