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RE-stepping mast on N28

MitchK

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Sep 22, 2017
102
Capital Yachts Newport 28 Burbank, WA
All, been awhile. Lots of things going on, so not much boat work. Finally finished re-wiring, re-sheaving and upgrading the mat lights and was able to re-step the mast this past Sun. Anyway, everything went well. I did have s couple of minor issues (missing mast head clevis pin), but was able to work it all out. Anyway, the mast is back up! Now to finish tuning the rigging, and replacing the various running rigging lines, and she will be ready to go. I also have a new main sail I will be installing. I will be ordering a new Jib/Genoa in a couple of months. Here are some pictures that show how the process went.

Mitch
 

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Likes: FDL S2
Oct 22, 2014
13,873
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Congrats @MitchK . Thanks for the pictures.
When you get the chances tell us how the sailing is with all the new gear.
 
Apr 4, 2016
201
Newport 28 Richardson Marina
Been off the forums for the summer, Nice job what did you make the A-frame out of?
 

MitchK

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Sep 22, 2017
102
Capital Yachts Newport 28 Burbank, WA
Ned, thanks for the response. The legs of the A frame are a bit out of the norm. I am always on the lookout for materials I can use in my various hobbies. A number of years ago I came across a pair of square fiberglass tubes that I picked up for little money. The square fiberglass tubing is the base of the leg construction. The tubing is 3" square with a 1/4 wall thickness and 20' long. I laminated four 2"x4"x8' boards together with epoxy, then ripped then to 2.5" square so they would slide up inside the fiberglass tubes, one wood insert on each end. The wood stuck out approx. 18" on each end for a total length of 23ft. The tubes and inserts are then cross drilled in four places. two per face. I then made a set of angle plates out of 2.5"x3/16x6" long steel. These are bent to an approximate 18 degree angle to match up at the top and to the angle angel iron pieces attached to the 2"x4" that is screwed to the toe rail. The apex of the A frame sits a couple of feet above the spreader pick point. Approximately 4ft from the bottom of one leg, I have a 800lb rated brake winch mounted to do the lifting and lowering. I used a 5/32 galvanized cable for the lifting. Everything I used in the system had a working load rating at least 3 times the weight of the mast and attached rigging. I set the A frame up and did a impromptu load test of about 250lbs to ensure my estimates were good before I put it on the boat. I estimate the A frame should be able to handle at least 500lbs, but have no intentions to use it at those weights. I have attached a couple of pictures showing the some of the A frame features. The discolored section on the leg with the winch is a repair I did to the tubing. At some time in the past, I managed to crack in the corners the end of one of the tubes. So I wrapped two layers of 1780 biaxial cloth and mat and epoxy resin to reinforce it. Probably wasn't necessary as the cross bolts and wood insert handled all of the compression loads, and any side loads. Anyway, the A frame was nice and stable.
 

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