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Poly X poll

Aug 31, 2017
57
Marshall 22 Falmouth, ME
Hi everyone

I was wondering if poly x hose has now been installed in enough boats long enough to gain some meaningful data on permeation failure.

I know already that Trident 101 has been a proven product, I am not asking for a discussion on the merits of another hose vs the poly x or any other. Feel free to do that elsewhere.

Peggie Hall mentioned in 2009 that the Trident hose has been in use for over a decade without a reported permeation failure, and obviously that is the best data available regarding a product. Since it’s now 2019, and the poly x has been around for a while, I am curious if there is any user evidence to back up or dispute poly x’s claim of zero permeation.

Just seeking some info.
 
Jan 11, 2014
4,259
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
Yes and I'm also interested in a very flexible less expensive hose for a mobile pump out in lieu of using a macerator.
 
Aug 31, 2017
57
Marshall 22 Falmouth, ME
I’d welcome any suggestions from you! I am still curious about the performance of poly x though. Have there been any reports of it failing or succeeding that you know of?
 
Dec 2, 1997
7,428
- - LIttle Rock
I’d welcome any suggestions from you! I am still curious about the performance of poly x though. Have there been any reports of it failing or succeeding that you know of?
I've yet to hear of any PolyX failures, but otoh I've yet to hear anything from anyone who's bought PolyX. So I suspect it lives up to its claims, but it's so overpriced that few people are buying it.
Trident 101/102 was the only hose I recommended for more than 15 years because there had never been a reported odor permeation failure in all the years (now 20+) it's been on the market. But it's always had one major drawback: it's as stiff as a 2x4 (I used to say "ironing board" till I learned that no one under 50 has any idea what an ironing board is!) making it not the best choice for use in a system that has a lot of bends in the hose runs.. Raritan introduced their SaniFlex hose about 10 years ago. It seemed promising, but because a track record is the only thing that matters to me, I just watched and waited to see how it would perform in "real world" use. After 8 years without a single reported odor permeation failure nor any anecdotal stories of failures, I became a believer...it's now my favorite hose...not only because it doesn't permeate, but because it's also so flexible that it can be bent like a hairpin without kinking. Plus, although it has a list price of about $15/ft, it can found for about $10./ft. Check it out: Raritan SaniFlex hose

--Peggie
 
Aug 31, 2017
57
Marshall 22 Falmouth, ME
Thank you Peggie. I will give it a look. Luckily I have almost a perfectly straight run from head to holding tank, sadly it slopes up very slightly. My need for anti-permeability outweighs flexibility; good to know I have multiple “headmistress approved” options.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2, 1997
7,428
- - LIttle Rock
There's a simple solution for your uphill run to the tank: a loop (doesn't have to be a vented loop, just a loop) in the toilet discharge line that's just slightly higher than the top of the tank. The toilet will only have to push the bowl contents over the top of the loop...gravity will do the rest. If your toilet is a manual toilet, it should have no problem pushing it over the loop in the dry mode as long as the joker valve is in good condition 'cuz any toilet that's working anywhere close to factory specs can lift bowl contents at least 4'. Follow the flush with a couple of pumps of clean water to rinse the line, switching to the dry mode to move last of the water over the loop. That will leave only about 1/2 cup of water to run back down to the toilet. Flushing this way also has another advantage: it can increase the number of flushes your tank can hold by at least 50% 'cuz you won't be filling it up with flush water.

However there's an even better solution that makes a lot of sense on any boat under about 28'--an MSD portapotty.
The "MSD" designation in the model name/number means it has fittings for a pumpout line and vent line, and is designed to be permanently installed (actually just sturdier brackets than portables, so you could still take it off the boat if you absolutely have to), which means that although it's still called a PORTApotty, you don't have to carry anything off the boat to empty it.
A 5-6 gallon model holds 50-60 flushes...you'd need at least a 30 gal tank to hold that many from a manual marine toilet. No plumbing needed except a vent line and pumpout hose--so no new holes in the boat...and -0- maintenance needed except for rinsing out the tank--which you can do with a bucket while it's being pumped out. Total cost including the pumpout hose and vent line is about $200--a fraction of what you'd spend for toilet, tank and all the related plumbing needed. And the best part is, you have all the advantages of a toilet and holding tank without giving up a single square foot of storage space.
Check out the Thetford 550P MSD and the Dometic/SeaLand 975MSD Sanipottie . Thetford has discontinued the 550PMSD, but it’s still available from most retailers…the Dometic 975MSD is still in production. They’re comparable, and not much can go wrong with either one, so if you like the Thetford find out if sbo.com still carries it before shopping for it elsewhere. Sbo.com does have the Dometic 975MSD.
So give it some thought. A lot of smaller boat owners here have gone this route and love it.

--Peggie
 
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Aug 31, 2017
57
Marshall 22 Falmouth, ME
Peggie

My little boat already has a raritan sea era electric head and 20 gallon holding tank (catboats pack a lot of features in) We have small kids and the push button is not something I want to part with. End of day if used I usually dump some freshwater in it with a bit of CP clean and run several flushes with the intake seacock closed (the intake pump on mine is a diaphragm pump so I hope I am correct in assuming I will not damage it doing this??).

I understand the benefit of the non-vented loop with a manual head, is this a benefit with an electric head? Can the macerator pump lift over that loop effectively? I assume if yes this would also minimize any leaking back into the bowl past the joker valve?

Thank you for your feedback as always.

Matt
 
Dec 2, 1997
7,428
- - LIttle Rock
I understand the benefit of the non-vented loop with a manual head, is this a benefit with an electric head? Can the macerator pump lift over that loop effectively?

Yep...unless the motor has gotten too sluggish (usually due to insufficient power) to be working anywhere near spec.

I assume if yes this would also minimize any leaking back into the bowl past the joker valve?


Nope....unless you have the optional 3 way flush panel that offers a "dry bowl" flush, all the water left in the line between the top of the loop and the toilet will run back downhill to the bowl. A NEW joker valve will keep it out of the bowl for a short time, but as the toilet is used, joker valves wear...and soon it'll start to allow very slow seepage that'll gradually become more as slit in the joker valve stretches with use. The good news is, the 3-way switch is available from Raritan for a semi-reasonable price...or if you don't mind a bit of runback, you'll know whether you're flushing long enough by whether that water is clean or a bit dirty.

--Peggie