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Outboard jib sheets?

May 1, 2019
22
oday 39 39 Jacksonville fl
I have a Oday 39, just got my new sails. The boat has inboard tracks but when, I'm not pointing hard to get a better shape it helps to move the jib sheet outboard. Was wondering what most are using.With the life lines just clipping the sheet to the rail doesn't really work I don't want to reroute the sheet outboard every time. Another set of sheets and buying secondary winches is an option but seems exessive and winches aren't cheap. I was looking at trying some kind of barberhauler setup but I'm not really seeing how it will be effective it will be hooking it where I would run the sheet to the rail. If anyone is using that would like to know how and where you have it set up. Also have been considering getting an adjustable jib car system how often are you messing with it, does the adjustment really make a big difference or kind of excessive once you get it set. I'm racing nonspin. I think the outboard sheeting is really something I need to figure out. thank you
 
Nov 8, 2010
11,046
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
What size headsail are you running? The bigger the sail, the less this will matter. For a jib (say LP 90-105) it will be a big deal. For a 150, much less so. But anyway, its always going to help. So, as a low cost solution, I would outhaul your sheets to the slotted toerail with a block there, controlling a outhaul line with a low-friction ring to hold the sheet, and bring the line back to a cleat or clutch in the cockpit. When on the wind, leave it loose and sheet normally. After you crack off say 10 degrees, pull the ring to the lifeline and then sheet on. That will give you a better sheeting angle. With the slotted rail, you can play with the positioning options.

And yes, remote adjustable genoa cars are worth their weigh in gold.
 
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May 1, 2019
22
oday 39 39 Jacksonville fl
I have a 135 headsail how are you getting over the lifeline chafe in that setup? Maybe run the jib car back and put that setup way forward.
 
Nov 8, 2007
1,319
Hunter 27_75-84 Sandusky Harbor Marina, Ohio
With a shoal keel, our h27 won't sail close to the wind, even if we point that way. So our genny sheets run outside the lifelines to a snap shackle block on the toerail. From there, it runs directly to the winch on the cockpit coaming with a cleat behind it. Same setup on both sides, and with wide stays, this was the standard setup for this model. When we shift from our 110 to our 135. we move our blocks back on the toerail to get the right sheeting angle.

If we roller reef either genny while underway, we move the snap shackle on the windward side accordingly, and move the other side after tacking. Not as slick as using tracks, but we can control sheeting angles and twist this way. Since we don't race Lady Lillie, this works fine. (I did race years ago, and we do trim our sails the best we can while cruising for the seamanship of it, and for the time it saves on long legs.) It would be easy for the deck crew to do while racing, except that you would have to tack to adjust twist of the foresail. Of course, to sail close to the wind, you would have to use a barber hauler, or the ring idea Jackdaw describes.

Just realized the ring wouldn't work with the sheet running outside the lifelines to the toerail then to the winch. Maybe he has figured out how to handle that.
 
Nov 8, 2010
11,046
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
I have a 135 headsail how are you getting over the lifeline chafe in that setup?
Maybe run the jib car back and put that setup way forward.
Anytime you ease to the point of having the headsail go over the lifeline it’s going to be a compromise. Usually even being 10-15 degrees off the wind and the best angle is still inside them. If you get that far off wind, most racers will be thinking about a kite or code sail. But as you sail non-spin, its your reality. So two things need to happen. The first is that the foot on the sail on the lifelines is going to disrupt shape. Things you can do:

Lower the top lifeline to the middle of the pulpit
If there is room for the luff to be higher, raise the sail on the furler, the higher tack will give more clearance.
Attach pool noodles to the top lifeline to lower chafe on the sail.

The second is that you need to sheet outside the lines, like a spinnaker. This will require a 2nd sheet, and often the sheeting point is farther forward than you would expect, to pull down on the sail and help keep the top from twisting totally off when eased that far.

Depending on the situation, you can leave that rigged, or attach when needed. I've don it both ways; it depends.
 
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Nov 8, 2010
11,046
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
If this happens a lot, a different sail will do wonders; the so-called jib-top sail. Basically a high clewed headsail, designed for blast reaching. the higher clew fixes the lifeline problem, and also sorts out the sheeting angle. And for any given LP, the same sail area. A real weapon for jib reaching.
 
May 1, 2019
22
oday 39 39 Jacksonville fl
Code zero would be awesome, just spend about 8500 on new sails so that's gonna have to wait.I have a symmetrical just dont have the crew to mess with sail changes during our little races. I will order the adjustable car system, Garhauler has a system for $350. I continue to see if any kind of outhauler would work, but I may end up having to add another set of gates in the lifelines. Using my spin sheets might be ok just dont know about swapping the sheets using one winch might have to add some jams or find secondary winches.
 
May 17, 2004
2,691
Beneteau Oceanis 37 LE Havre de Grace
I run a separate reaching sheet from a block on the rail, under the lifelines. We tie it onto the clew only when needed. It is a bit of a handful switching the winch between the two, but not impossible, though usually we’re doing it in low winds. If the course allows it you can run the whole reaching leg on the reaching sheet without needing to switch (tack or gybe at the marks), but that’s often not possible. I had thought about the ring barberhauler that jackdaw suggests, but the lifelines would be in the way on all but close reaches.
 
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Likes: henrykorous
Nov 8, 2010
11,046
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
I run a separate reaching sheet from a block on the rail, under the lifelines. We tie it onto the clew only when needed. It is a bit of a handful switching the winch between the two, but not impossible, though usually we’re doing it in low winds. If the course allows it you can run the whole reaching leg on the reaching sheet without needing to switch (tack or gybe at the marks), but that’s often not possible. I had thought about the ring barberhauler that jackdaw suggests, but the lifelines would be in the way on all but close reaches.
That's the deal. There are two jib-reaching modes (inside and out), and if you want to be fast, you have to have the hardware and skills to do both.

As BB King said, 'Payin' the cost to be the Boss'