• Mobile App For Android Now Online!

    Download it here. The app is searchable in the Google Play Store under Sailboat Owners.

    Sorry iPhone/iPad users, we are still waiting on Apple. :(

    Click the X in the upper right corner to make this go away

Oda322 topping lift

Feb 10, 2009
6
oday 322 Port Henry Marina
can anyone tell me the correct way to attach the topping lift to the back of my z spar boom. I don’t believe the marina correctly did it right
 

SG

Feb 11, 2017
1,466
J/Boat J/160 Annapolis
Do you have a picture of what they did?

Do you mean just "attach" or "rig"? (e.g., does the topping lift have a block on it at the boom end? Does it run up from the boom-end to the masthead and then through (or over) a block; and, then down to the deck area to adjust from near the gooseneck or whatever? Etc.???
 
Jan 7, 2011
1,510
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
Here is a photo of how my topping lift attaches to the boom. Not sure what that little shackle is called...

81CBC1C3-32F9-4ECE-96E2-4A5CC148F2D6.jpeg

My topping lift ties off at a cleat on the mast. It is not run back to the cockpit. I seldom move it (usually just when I set my winter cover over the boom...to tighten the cover a bit).

Greg
 

SG

Feb 11, 2017
1,466
J/Boat J/160 Annapolis
Greg / Tally Ho:

That's on you're post looks like it was intended for a much larger load than just a "little topping lift". Did the boat have a Dutchman or something else?


CurtisAC:
My topping lift ties off at a cleat on the mast. It is not run back to the cockpit. I seldom move it (usually just when I set my winter cover over the boom...to tighten the cover a bit)
Sometimes, I've seen Oday's with little block on a shackle that attaches to the topping lift above the boom. Then a line runs up- to the topping lift and then down from the boom end. Then it runs through another block and along the boom to toward the goose neck. It's then adjustable from forward. Sometimes people have a roller furling main -- that's a different set-up requirement.

You can have a set-up like Greg showed, but then you have to go "up" to the masthead and then "down" toward the deck along the mast.

Again, what is the rest of your story? Pictures are worth a lot in helping....
 
Jan 7, 2011
1,510
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
I don’t think Tally Ho had a Dutchman. That shackle is not real heavy duty, but holds the boom up just fine.

As someone else noted, you could use a boom kicker instead. I had one on my Hunter 280. That boat had no backstay (B&R rig) and no topping lift. I could run a very full roach main since there was nothing in the way behind the mast.

Greg
 

SG

Feb 11, 2017
1,466
J/Boat J/160 Annapolis
I don’t think Tally Ho had a Dutchman. That shackle is not real heavy duty, but holds the boom up just fine

Greg
I was wondering about the apparent diameter of the line. The shackle size seems a function of the boom end.
 
Nov 8, 2010
10,586
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
Even with a solid vang or boomkicker, a topping lift function is a good idea. It will fully support a person falling against the boom, and the tension between it and mainsheet keep the whole thing steady when moored. Most performance minded sailors remove any dedicated topping lift and attach the main halyard to the end of the boom to serve the exactly same purpose. And it keeps the halyard from slapping the mast.
 
Last edited:
Jan 7, 2011
1,510
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
I was wondering about the apparent diameter of the line. The shackle size seems a function of the boom end.
Not sure what diameter. About the same as my main halyard I think. Maybe a little lighter.

Greg
 

SG

Feb 11, 2017
1,466
J/Boat J/160 Annapolis
Greg, For example, if the halyard is (say 1/2:") I'd guess you could get by with 3/8"for the topping lift. You just need to hold the boom up and some stretch is okay. If it's a spare main (like for a storm tri sail) then maybe big halyard would make sense.
 
Nov 8, 2010
10,586
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
Greg, For example, if the halyard is (say 1/2:") I'd guess you could get by with 3/8"for the topping lift. You just need to hold the boom up and some stretch is okay. If it's a spare main (like for a storm tri sail) then maybe big halyard would make sense.
1/2 inch? The boat has a 220 sqr/ft mainsail. That seems too big by half.
 
Jan 7, 2011
1,510
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
Yeah, I don’t know for sure, it was on the boat when I bought her. It can certainly be used as a spare halyard, a safety line when climbing the stick, a big line to hold up the boom when pulling something heavy up from the water or down below...

Doesn’t bother me, would not change it at this point.

Greg
 
Jan 7, 2011
1,510
Oday 322 East Chicago, IN
I pulled my O’Day 322 manual from the boat tonight and it lists main halyard and topping lift both as 3/8”.

Main sheet and Genoa sheets are listed as 7/16”.

Greg
 
Feb 22, 2010
37
Oday 322 Delaware River
As Tally Ho says, my main halyard and topping lift are both 3/8". My end attachment is the same as Tally Ho - a small shackle. The factory rig is to take the topping lift from the end of the boom to the top of the mast, down the inside of the mast, exit 5' off the deck, and to a mast cleat, which is how I used it for 10 years. Recently , I have run the topping lift back to a port cabin top winch I recently installed. I do have to adjust the topping lift slightly, because I want to lift it up a few inches above my bimini when tied up, but release it those same few inches underway, so that close hauled the main has a nice tight closed shape (no twist) in light to moderate winds. If I did not have a bimini, it could stay the same place all season. I would not want less than 3/8" topping lift, unless it was dyneema.
 

SG

Feb 11, 2017
1,466
J/Boat J/160 Annapolis
As Tally Ho says, my main halyard and topping lift are both 3/8". My end attachment is the same as Tally Ho - a small shackle. The factory rig is to take the topping lift from the end of the boom to the top of the mast, down the inside of the mast, exit 5' off the deck, and to a mast cleat, which is how I used it for 10 years. Recently , I have run the topping lift back to a port cabin top winch I recently installed. I do have to adjust the topping lift slightly, because I want to lift it up a few inches above my bimini when tied up, but release it those same few inches underway, so that close hauled the main has a nice tight closed shape (no twist) in light to moderate winds. If I did not have a bimini, it could stay the same place all season. I would not want less than 3/8" topping lift, unless it was dyneema.
Andre of NJ (maybe Exit 11?) ;^))))

If you have a small shackle you need to match the ultimate load with the weakest link. The load on the end of the boom when close hauled in a bunch of wind (with some shock loads added) might overwhelm the shackle.

You want the topping lift NOT to take "sheeted-in" loads and transfer them to the masthead. It's really ONLY INTENDED to keep the boom up if there is a release the of uplift on the main. This is usually, but not always, from you releasing the halyard to lower the main to stow or reef the mainsail. In some crazy jibe situation, strange things can happen too. God forbid that the main breaks and the topping lift keeps the clew end of the boom from braining someone....

If you use a 3/8" line, a braided Dacron or polyester line is MORE THAN enough. The issue with the line is really how easy it is for you to handle it. A little stretch is fine -- though I wouldn't use braided nylon. The reason I'd used a braided line is it holds less dirt, is easier on the hands, and it's more UV resistant.