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Newb Paint Question

Apr 28, 2020
43
Catalina 22 Washington, NC
We just got an 86 Catalina 22. The bottom needs to be painted before we put her back in the water and got that quoted at ~$700. We also asked for a quote to re-paint the hull sides and it was $4,400!? They recommended we just "compound and wax the hull sides". Sorry for the dumb question, I just need to be educated on this. What do I need, and what do I not need (currently and annually)
 

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Aug 17, 2013
614
Grampian G26 Ottawa/Gatineau
why not do it yourself? painting the bottom is an easy job, just clean her up nicely and apply some paint
 
Apr 28, 2020
43
Catalina 22 Washington, NC
why not do it yourself? painting the bottom is an easy job, just clean her up nicely and apply some paint
I just don't have the proper protective gear or experience to do it. I heard that anti fouling stuff is pretty nasty to deal with
 
Jun 25, 2004
1,108
Corsair F24 Mk1 003 San Francisco Bay, CA
If you have never done an anti foul bottom job, it might be worth the money to pay them...and to watch how they do it. NExt time you will know how to do it properly if you prefer to do the work your self.

As for the hull, an acid wash, compound and a wax is a good idea. You can do it yourself, or pay a pro. It’s like buffing out a car, but first you acid wash to remove stains, and you have to compound at lower speeds so you don’t melt the gelcoat. Here’s a link to the ultimate boat shining thread:

 
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May 1, 2020
1
Catalina 22 Lake Calhoun
Power wash the hull, hit it with some 150 grit sand paper and then roll the antifoul paint on with a 3/8 nap roller. It will take you a half a day and cost you $100 bucks tops.
 
Jun 25, 2004
1,108
Corsair F24 Mk1 003 San Francisco Bay, CA
Power wash the hull, hit it with some 150 grit sand paper and then roll the antifoul paint on with a 3/8 nap roller. It will take you a half a day and cost you $100 bucks tops.
I wish it were that easy and inexpensive. It has never been like that for me. I can’t count how many times I’ve done anti fouling paint jobs on boats, and it was always more work than that to sand and put on two+ coats.

First, there’s the time and maybe money to put the boat up on stands. That alone can take a couple of hours at the start and finish. And you have to have boat stands, or at least some DIY substitute.

For sanding the old paint smooth and to get the new paint to adhere well, you’ll need to rig up a high quality vacuum to the sander, and wear a really good particle respirator, if you respect your health and the environment. 80 grit is what you usually use. Follow directions for how long to wait between the first and second coat. Usually you want two coats, with a third coat at the waterline and on the leadind edges of the keel and rudder. It’s at least three hours at 90 degrees for many paints.

I’ve done bottom paint on my Catalina 27s, Potter 19s, J/70s, Corsairs, and helped with lots of friends boats. I’ve paid to have it done too. Paying a professional to do it is a lot easier on my 68 year old back and knees but tougher on the wallet.

My advice is to read and follow instructions on the can to the letter, if you do it yourself. There are different kinds of paints, all with different requirements. Research to be sure the new paint is compatible with the old. For example, you usually cant put solvent based paint over water based paint without extra procedures.

Research the best paint for your local conditions: fresh water, brackish, salt. Year round vs 5 month season. Keep the boat in a wet slip vs sometimes on a trailer.

Judy B
 
Feb 21, 2013
3,421
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
I just don't have the proper protective gear or experience to do it. I heard that anti fouling stuff is pretty nasty to deal with
No big deal. My wife and I sanded and painted the bottom of our first sailboat, a Hunter 31, without prior experience. Wear a painter hooded overalls with booties, face/mouth/eye protection and gloves. Afterwards, treat yourself to a nice dinner (take-out I assume). It saved us a lot of money and we got to bond with our new to us used sailboat. Since then, we have the boat hauled and painted by a boat yard, primarily since our boat size has increased.

 
Sep 22, 2018
1,869
Hunter 216 Kingston
We just got an 86 Catalina 22. The bottom needs to be painted before we put her back in the water and got that quoted at ~$700. We also asked for a quote to re-paint the hull sides and it was $4,400!? They recommended we just "compound and wax the hull sides". Sorry for the dumb question, I just need to be educated on this. What do I need, and what do I not need (currently and annually)
You state the bottom “needs” to be painted. You also ask what you “need” (and not need) to do.

I would say the answers to those questions depend somewhat on how you plan to use your boat, your budget, your willingness to invest time “working” on the boat rather than sailing it.

I would suggest that it would help if you could provide some detail on how you will be approaching your new adventure.
 
Apr 28, 2020
43
Catalina 22 Washington, NC
Last time the bottom was painted was 2016. the mechanic that inspected it before the purchase said it needs to be done. We are in the Sounds of eastern NC. We will be keeping in a wet slip for 6-8 months at a time
 
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HMT2

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Mar 20, 2014
881
Hunter 31 828 Shoreacres, TX
You NEED bottom paint. You can have the hull sides waxed and buffed to make her look good.
 
Sep 22, 2018
1,869
Hunter 216 Kingston
Last time the bottom was painted was 2016. the mechanic that inspected it before the purchase said it needs to be done. We are in the Sounds of eastern NC. We will be keeping in a wet slip for 6-8 months at a time
As I see it you are considering two “paint” projects.

1) The bottom coating is primarily to prevent a buildup of marine growth and to some degree protect the original material the boat was constructed with.

If you think about it the bottom of the boat didn’t come out of the factory with anything on it.

What you coat the original surface with depends on water “type” fresh vs brackish vs salt, how dormant the boat is, trailered or in a slip etc. There are a lot of product choices out there and some depend on what has been “painted” on before. Ask around at your marina about what the locals use.

Some racers don’t coat at all as their boats don’t sit in the water very long.

In fact even though you have a slip; if you have a trailer you could periodically haul out, pressure wash the gunk off and relaunch so you might not “need” to coat it at all.

Simple right ;)

2) The above the water line paint job is purely aesthetics. How bright and shiny the boat is comes down to a very personal choice. Put two identical boats on the water and the shiny “new looking” one isn’t necessarily better.

As you are just getting started I would suggest time and $ should be allocated towards new sails, rigging, motor, safety equipment etc. Pride of ownership has many different perspectives.

Lots of experienced “how to” advice here on SBO.

Have fun - sail SAFE
 
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Jan 1, 2006
5,953
Slickcraft 26 Greenport, NY
Painting a bottom and painting the topsides are different animals. The big difference being that cosmetics isn't an issue for the bottom. So there's a much lengthier process for the topsides - because you and a future boat owner wants a long lasting, beautiful and durable finish. The bottom is redone every year or so. It has to be smooth but it doesn't need to gleam. $700 for a bottom isn't too bad - if they do a good job. I paid something like that in NY but I wasn't allowed to DIY. They did almost no prep and even painted over barnacles. $4,400 for topsides isn't unfair - again if they do a professional job. I paid around $6,000 for my Ranger 29 a decade or so ago. Good job by a pro. When I say professional I mean doing it indoors, tented, sprayed, 2-4 coats with clear finish. Moving boat indoors, setting up on stands etc included.
You can do a 10' it looks good enough job yourself but you will likely need to drape the boat to contain dust (Which in many areas is hazardous waste) while sanding and later to avoid pollen and other debris from settling on your paint job. At least with the bottom paint you can be more tolerate of incidental dust and tree detritus. Again in many areas painting your bottom is regarded as applying a pesticide and requires a license.
The days of applying paint in a yard with sanding and using copper, antimony, or lead based bottom paints are pretty much ended. Do it in your home driveway? Think about it.
 
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