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micron vs micron

Sep 10, 2012
219
Hunter 450 Gulfport, Florida
I am looking at a Racor dual turbine filter separator. They are available in 2, 10, and 30 micron filtration levels. The smaller the particulate screened of course the better for the rest of the fuel system, but it is going to also be more prone to clogging. What is the best compromise to protect and yet serve?
 
May 24, 2004
6,746
CC 30 South Florida
Get the 30 micron to filter out larger impurities and let the engine secondary filter take care of the small stuff. Even a 10 micron in rough seas will get clogged rather fast.
 
Dec 19, 2006
5,725
Hunter 36 Punta Gorda
Racor 500

I have one of the Racor 500 right out of the tank with 10 micron
since 08 and I do filter my fuel most times with a filtering funnel
most of the time and never have any clogging on my 3YM30 and it has the Yanmar filter up on the front of the engine also which doesn't need changing
often and the 500 drop in filter easy to change and so cheap compared to the
twist on Racor.
Nick
 
Mar 20, 2012
3,983
Cal 34-III, MacGregor 25 Salem, Oregon
Get the 30 micron to filter out larger impurities and let the engine secondary filter take care of the small stuff. Even a 10 micron in rough seas will get clogged rather fast.
UNLESS.. you have a clean fuel tank.
A clean fuel tank may be rare in an older boat that no one has ever taken the time to clean the tank.

Its just a good idea to make an effort to suck out the fuel tank every few years to prevent the unnecessary surprises of clogged filters in a rough seaway... or when the fuel level gets low, as this causes a greater degree of sloshing in the tank and stirring/mixing up the sediments which get sucked up into the filters.
 

pateco

.
Aug 12, 2014
2,207
Hunter 31 (1983) Pompano Beach FL
I had the misfortune of needing a tow back in last weekend.

It was a rough day getting out the Hillsboro inlet, and we took water over the bow several times before we cleared the breakwater. Motor had no issues on the way out, and we sailed all morning. Half way through the day, the boys wanted to go diving on one of the reefs of Pompano beach, so we dropped the sails and motored to the reef balls. Just as we were trying to tie up, the diesel engine cut out and would not restart. I had to drop anchor.

While the boys used the Brownies to dive the reef,


I tried to restart the engine to no avail, and then tried to determine if I could repair the engine for our trip back through the ICW to our dock. An hour wasted with no luck. I determined it was probable clogged filters due to the rough conditions on our trip out to sea. But when I checked the boat, I found no spare filters aboard. So when the boys were done, we hauled anchor, and sailed back to the inlet. I had to call Tow Boat US, and they met us at the inlet to tow us back to our dock in Pompano Beach. Their unlimited tow insurance was the best investment in the boat so far





It was getting dark by the time we docked, and cleaned up the boat,



so later this week, I went back and took pictures of the filter housings, and ordered the filters online.

Primary Fuel Filter RACOR 500FG



Secondary engine mounted filter Yanmar 2GM


The secondary filters arrived today, and the primaries are due in on Monday. I ordered two of each, so that I will now have spares aboard.
 
Jan 22, 2008
1,483
Hunter 37 C sloop Punta Gorda FL
Might want more than one especially for the racor. Bad fuel or dirty tank does not cure itself.
 
Mar 28, 2015
16
Hunter 40.5 Ipswich, UK
I'v spent quite a while in marine engineering and have noticed people can quite often oversee the importance of fuel filtration.

The filters are there to protect the engines fuel system and maintain good performance (obvious I know).

Engine manufactures fit filters on there engines assuming the fuel is of good quality. Often the quality of fuel in marine environments is not 'good'. Often I find (I have done it myself) even the basics are not followed... Keep tanks full, drain off sludge, clean tanks.

I would suggest you carry a good number of spare filters. A good number depends how long you need your engine for... I.e an Atlantic cruise with 400ltrs of fuel to use or a cruise around the bay and need the engine for 10 mins to get you home. I know when I go to sea for a day or two I would like at least 5 onboard.

The racor filters of the turbine variety are great. You can pull the element out, fill the chamber and get going again without problem.

Engine filters are normally around 2-5 microns. So how much dirt would you be allowing through with a 30 micron filter!!!! Sure it will catch the big stuff but it only takes tiny particles to damage injectors and HP fuel pumps. I know I would rather change a filter then a fuel pump or set of injectors.
I work with some big offshore boats using 1500ltr a day. They have 10 micron racors (two of so that they can switch to the second clean number 1 and so on) the engines have 2 filters and the same principle. I'm not saying we should all go and fit more filters!!!

So keep the tank clean, I'm not keen on putting loads of additives in to resolve diesel bug and break down dirt ether, however as a form of prevention it can't be bad?

Sorry that's gone on a bit.
 

Johnb

.
Jan 22, 2008
1,286
Hunter 37-cutter Richmond CA
[Sorry that's gone on a bit.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, but it was worth reading
 
Feb 6, 1998
11,436
Canadian Sailcraft 36T Casco Bay, ME
I'v spent quite a while in marine engineering and have noticed people can quite often oversee the importance of fuel filtration.

The filters are there to protect the engines fuel system and maintain good performance (obvious I know).

Engine manufactures fit filters on there engines assuming the fuel is of good quality. Often the quality of fuel in marine environments is not 'good'. Often I find (I have done it myself) even the basics are not followed... Keep tanks full, drain off sludge, clean tanks.

I would suggest you carry a good number of spare filters. A good number depends how long you need your engine for... I.e an Atlantic cruise with 400ltrs of fuel to use or a cruise around the bay and need the engine for 10 mins to get you home. I know when I go to sea for a day or two I would like at least 5 onboard.

The racor filters of the turbine variety are great. You can pull the element out, fill the chamber and get going again without problem.

Engine filters are normally around 2-5 microns. So how much dirt would you be allowing through with a 30 micron filter!!!! Sure it will catch the big stuff but it only takes tiny particles to damage injectors and HP fuel pumps. I know I would rather change a filter then a fuel pump or set of injectors.
I work with some big offshore boats using 1500ltr a day. They have 10 micron racors (two of so that they can switch to the second clean number 1 and so on) the engines have 2 filters and the same principle. I'm not saying we should all go and fit more filters!!!

So keep the tank clean, I'm not keen on putting loads of additives in to resolve diesel bug and break down dirt ether, however as a form of prevention it can't be bad?

Sorry that's gone on a bit.
The on engine filters for most every Japanese engine out there including Yanmar is in the 10-17 micron range (Yanmar on engine 10-15 micron).

Yanmar sells their own "Yanmar" re-branded primary fuel filter for their marine AUX engines and the 4230B is what is recommended for most sailboat engines.. They are made by Racor and cost more with the Yanmar name on them but, they are 30 micron primary filters. This is the filter that Yanmar stands behind and what passes warranty, a 30 micron primary..

Westerbeke recommends a 30 micron primary if you have more than 10' feet of fuel hose in the system and you can use a 10 micron primary if you have less than 10' of fuel hose (Westerbeke & Universal on-engine filter 15-17 micron).

The Yanmar recommended 30 Micron primary, is a re-badged Racor:


 
May 24, 2004
6,746
CC 30 South Florida
It does not make sense to use the same or more restrictive filter in the primary/separator function than on the engine secondary. What is the object? Trying to never have to replace the secondary? Clean fuel tanks could last just until the next fill up at a transit marina.
 
Dec 2, 1999
15,184
Hunter Vision-36 Rio Vista, CA.
We have moved from a single primary filter to a dual filter system. We can switch from one primary to an alternate one by turning a couple of levers.

This is a good solution for a backup.
 
Mar 28, 2015
16
Hunter 40.5 Ipswich, UK
It does not make sense to use the same or more restrictive filter in the primary/separator function than on the engine secondary. What is the object? Trying to never have to replace the secondary? Clean fuel tanks could last just until the next fill up at a transit marina.
Don't think anyone has said use the same it's just the 10/30 that's often debated. Your right your tanks are only clean till the next fill or if the filler or vent let water in etc... But over time you will get condensation and fuel is never spotless (unless your really lucky) I.e. Dirty jerry cans and funnels. Commercial boats have to have tank cleaning schedules for a reason.
 
Sep 10, 2012
219
Hunter 450 Gulfport, Florida
I ordered the Racor turbine 755500 with the 10 micron elements and expect to bring a few of 10 and 30 micron spares in case of clogging. I have well water and cascade the elements down from 50-20-5 for triple filtration, for fuel it seems to be one or another.
 
Jan 12, 2011
930
Hunter 410 full time cruiser
Get the 30 micron to filter out larger impurities and let the engine secondary filter take care of the small stuff. Even a 10 micron in rough seas will get clogged rather fast.
And what real difference does that make? If it was going to clog a 10 micron primary it is just going to clog the 10 micron secondary after it passes through a 30 micron primary.