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Is Wednesday still photo day?

TomY

Alden Forum Moderator
Jun 22, 2004
1,870
Alden 38' Challenger yawl Rockport Harbor
Hi Phil! Nice shot, I think I know that boat but I can't think of it. Glad to hear you're getting time with your daughter so far away (are you still out west?).

We see ours several times a year. She's still living in Brooklyn and sends pics all day long. It's a great era to be a parent.

Brooklyn waterfront snapped by my daugther Mary Jane, on her way home.
Brooklyn waterfront.jpeg


She has the eye. :)
 
Feb 11, 2017
15
Thanks Tom. Just a quick iPhone photo while cruising around in a 420. Yes, we are still in Boulder. Odds are we will get closer to an ocean in ~3 years or so. Samantha has just over a year left at Stony Brook. After her gap year she decided to push straight through taking summer classes and winter break research classes while working as a paid intern in one of the marine biology research labs. We typically see her for ~1 week at Christmas and during ~4 day weekends where we go out to NY. We did meet up with her in Mexico over spring break and had a blast with her. She plans to move to Honolulu when she graduates. She'll spend one year working in a research lab and teaching sailing lessons while getting residency then it's on to grad school at UH. Katarina is living at home while studying pre-med at CU. She has 2 years left then she's off med school after a gap year.
 
Feb 11, 2017
196
Gulfstar 1979 Gulfstar 37 BELFAST
Photo Day! Good to have it back. Speaking of daughters, mine is married now, living in Seattle lovin' life. Her husband, and three other guys are gearing up for the R2AK which starts on Monday. There are 4 of them traveling to Ketchikan on a Melges 24, slightly altered by this pedal drive system........I'll be watching.....https://r2ak.com/
60099286_590150311477490_6091134877023862784_o.jpg
60360442_590150331477488_7714700615913308160_o.jpg
 

TomY

Alden Forum Moderator
Jun 22, 2004
1,870
Alden 38' Challenger yawl Rockport Harbor
Photo Day! Good to have it back. Speaking of daughters, mine is married now, living in Seattle lovin' life. Her husband, and three other guys are gearing up for the R2AK which starts on Monday. There are 4 of them traveling to Ketchikan on a Melges 24, slightly altered by this pedal drive system........I'll be watching.....https://r2ak.com/
View attachment 165504 View attachment 165505
That is interesting, Nat! Keep us posted.
 
Feb 11, 2017
15
That is incredibly cool! I would seriously consider belts over chains for the stern units.
 
May 25, 2012
2,193
john alden caravelle 42 sturgeon bay, wis
looks like radio control, apc airplane props, designed to turn 9,000- 10,000- ish rpm in air. i know rc/airplane props, i know sailboat and motorboat and steamboat props, but i do not have a clew as to what happens when you spin an airplane prop in the water. what fun trying things outside the box. good luck to the team on their adventure. :)
 
Feb 11, 2017
196
Gulfstar 1979 Gulfstar 37 BELFAST
R2AK is over for some, including Team Educated Guess who placed 5th. No ratings formula for this race so finishing order stands. This Day 6 report sort of sums up the final days....
https://r2ak.com/2019-daily-updates/2019-day-6-celebrations-and-the-knife-edge-between-tragedy-and-triumph/



"The standout of the night was Team Educated Guess, whose three beers in recounting offered up a stream of next level jaw droppers that caused even the R2AK racers to shake their heads and genuflect inwardly. Team Educated Guess’ campaign was the kind of R2AK science experiment that fused fast boats with good sailors and the infinite possibilities of a race without guardrails. They upgraded their Melges 24 with a trapeze; a set of harnesses that allow crew to stand on the edge of the boat and extend their body over the water—their body a counterweight to the force in the sails. You can sail without the trapeze, all the other teams did, but a trap provides the leverage to drive the boat harder at the cost of safety. Did they use it? All the time and forever. “We trapezed from Cape Mudge to Current Pass.” How long was that? “I dunno, ten hours…something? They worked out a system to wake each other up when they fell asleep out there.” Still, they had limits: they never trapped downwind.

They had been on the edge and they knew it. With every detail of their humility displaced adrenaline, the face of their audience reflected just how lucky they had been. The apex moment was a downwind run in 40 knots in Hecate strait. “We were hitting 18 regularly.” Their 24-foot boat was on a downwind rager in 40 knots of wind, careening down wave faces 2/3 the size of their boat and making 18 knots on the steady. “We’d get on 16-foot cresting waves, and one of them would break under you and the sea would just fall away and the boat would drop 4 feet.” The drop was the take off assist for a surf down the wave face that would accelerate the boat over 20 knots. “22 was our top.”

This went on for hours. With a full main and a full spinnaker they had carried too much sail for too long. The standard way to shorten sail is to nose the boat into the wind to depower the sails, which in this case would have meant bringing the boat into the waves, and before they got there they’d be broadside to and the boat would roll. Add to that rock in a hard place, at speeds like that, some mind-bending physics starts to take over. When the boat was going slow (ie 15 knots) the trimmer couldn’t work the sheets; they were just too loaded with the force of the sails. But when the boat accelerated to warp speed, the apparent wind dropped and took enough load off the sails to allow for adjustment. It was impossible to put a reef in the main, so they came up with a plan. “I was like, alright boys, the next time we get on top of some big f***-off wave and we hit 22, douse it.” They struck the spinnaker in 35 knots of wind, 15-foot seas, going 22 knots, on a 24-foot boat.

Jaw drop. Genuflect."
 
Nov 8, 2010
10,600
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
R2AK is over for some, including Team Educated Guess who placed 5th. No ratings formula for this race so finishing order stands. This Day 6 report sort of sums up the final days....
https://r2ak.com/2019-daily-updates/2019-day-6-celebrations-and-the-knife-edge-between-tragedy-and-triumph/



"The standout of the night was Team Educated Guess, whose three beers in recounting offered up a stream of next level jaw droppers that caused even the R2AK racers to shake their heads and genuflect inwardly. Team Educated Guess’ campaign was the kind of R2AK science experiment that fused fast boats with good sailors and the infinite possibilities of a race without guardrails. They upgraded their Melges 24 with a trapeze; a set of harnesses that allow crew to stand on the edge of the boat and extend their body over the water—their body a counterweight to the force in the sails. You can sail without the trapeze, all the other teams did, but a trap provides the leverage to drive the boat harder at the cost of safety. Did they use it? All the time and forever. “We trapezed from Cape Mudge to Current Pass.” How long was that? “I dunno, ten hours…something? They worked out a system to wake each other up when they fell asleep out there.” Still, they had limits: they never trapped downwind.

They had been on the edge and they knew it. With every detail of their humility displaced adrenaline, the face of their audience reflected just how lucky they had been. The apex moment was a downwind run in 40 knots in Hecate strait. “We were hitting 18 regularly.” Their 24-foot boat was on a downwind rager in 40 knots of wind, careening down wave faces 2/3 the size of their boat and making 18 knots on the steady. “We’d get on 16-foot cresting waves, and one of them would break under you and the sea would just fall away and the boat would drop 4 feet.” The drop was the take off assist for a surf down the wave face that would accelerate the boat over 20 knots. “22 was our top.”

This went on for hours. With a full main and a full spinnaker they had carried too much sail for too long. The standard way to shorten sail is to nose the boat into the wind to depower the sails, which in this case would have meant bringing the boat into the waves, and before they got there they’d be broadside to and the boat would roll. Add to that rock in a hard place, at speeds like that, some mind-bending physics starts to take over. When the boat was going slow (ie 15 knots) the trimmer couldn’t work the sheets; they were just too loaded with the force of the sails. But when the boat accelerated to warp speed, the apparent wind dropped and took enough load off the sails to allow for adjustment. It was impossible to put a reef in the main, so they came up with a plan. “I was like, alright boys, the next time we get on top of some big f***-off wave and we hit 22, douse it.” They struck the spinnaker in 35 knots of wind, 15-foot seas, going 22 knots, on a 24-foot boat.

Jaw drop. Genuflect."
Thats pretty badass.
 
Nov 8, 2010
10,600
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
"The standout of the night was Team Educated Guess, whose three beers in recounting offered up a stream of next level jaw droppers that caused even the R2AK racers to shake their heads and genuflect inwardly. Team Educated Guess’ campaign was the kind of R2AK science experiment that fused fast boats with good sailors and the infinite possibilities of a race without guardrails. They upgraded their Melges 24 with a trapeze; a set of harnesses that allow crew to stand on the edge of the boat and extend their body over the water—their body a counterweight to the force in the sails. You can sail without the trapeze, all the other teams did, but a trap provides the leverage to drive the boat harder at the cost of safety. Did they use it? All the time and forever. “We trapezed from Cape Mudge to Current Pass.” How long was that? “I dunno, ten hours…something? They worked out a system to wake each other up when they fell asleep out there.” Still, they had limits: they never trapped downwind.

They had been on the edge and they knew it. With every detail of their humility displaced adrenaline, the face of their audience reflected just how lucky they had been. The apex moment was a downwind run in 40 knots in Hecate strait. “We were hitting 18 regularly.” Their 24-foot boat was on a downwind rager in 40 knots of wind, careening down wave faces 2/3 the size of their boat and making 18 knots on the steady. “We’d get on 16-foot cresting waves, and one of them would break under you and the sea would just fall away and the boat would drop 4 feet.” The drop was the take off assist for a surf down the wave face that would accelerate the boat over 20 knots. “22 was our top.”

This went on for hours. With a full main and a full spinnaker they had carried too much sail for too long. The standard way to shorten sail is to nose the boat into the wind to depower the sails, which in this case would have meant bringing the boat into the waves, and before they got there they’d be broadside to and the boat would roll. Add to that rock in a hard place, at speeds like that, some mind-bending physics starts to take over. When the boat was going slow (ie 15 knots) the trimmer couldn’t work the sheets; they were just too loaded with the force of the sails. But when the boat accelerated to warp speed, the apparent wind dropped and took enough load off the sails to allow for adjustment. It was impossible to put a reef in the main, so they came up with a plan. “I was like, alright boys, the next time we get on top of some big f***-off wave and we hit 22, douse it.” They struck the spinnaker in 35 knots of wind, 15-foot seas, going 22 knots, on a 24-foot boat.

Jaw drop. Genuflect."
That's a Sailing Anarchy - worthy race report. But SA would left the profanity in. Because that is the perfect way to describe that wave.
 
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