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I'm considering buying a NewPort 30

Apr 3, 2013
13
MacGregor V2-22 Trailered
Because it's been since the 90s since I've sailed regularly and the last time I sailed at all was 15 years ago. Back then, it was just me, self taught, and being in my 20s back then, I didn't have much regard for whether things were dangerous or stupid. I just did them. Now I have a wife to think about and I feel a whole lot less invincible. Back then it didn't even cross my mind to be prepared for something as simple as what to do if someone went overboard.

I've been riding motorcycle since I was 16. A motorcycle was my only form of transportation for most of my 20s. I still ride, but last year I decided to take a couple motorcycle riding and safety classes. Did I need the classes? Probably not, but I'm glad I took them. It broke me of a couple bad habits I had while riding.

So,
1) to refresh my sailing knowledge
2) to break any bad habits I might have from being self taught
3) I've never been very good at docking
4) I think it'll be a fun thing to do with my wife.
 
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Oct 22, 2014
15,803
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
3) I've never been very good at docking
I was with you right up to this point.
Being good at docking is all about understanding your boat and applying simple techniques. Most sailors fail to understand their boat. And then they choose not to practice the basics that will enable them to become a good "boat handler" (i.e. use of a spring line, turning you boat with in it's length, application of Prop Walk...).

You want to be a good docker get your boat and learn how she reacts if you back up or go forward at slow RPM. Then use this info to apply to your movement in our out of confined space.

I have not seen classes of 15 students a good teacher to student ratio to impart good docking skills. 60 minutes you in your baot with a competent seaman and you'll become a "good" docker. At least for 85% of the time you have to dock. The other 15% is practice skill built and involves the times you are not likely to be out on your boat.
 
Jan 1, 2006
5,985
Slickcraft 26 Greenport, NY
It's too bad you can't go to Payne's dock on Block Island on a windy afternoon. Those guys will teach you to handle your boat in five minutes. You just do exactly what they say. They're polite, will call you captain, but firm. And it works. " Put your wheel all the way over to the left. Forward. Reverse. Forward. Reverse. Pretty soon you're in.
 
Apr 3, 2013
13
MacGregor V2-22 Trailered
I was with you right up to this point.
Being good at docking is all about understanding your boat and applying simple techniques. Most sailors fail to understand their boat. And then they choose not to practice the basics that will enable them to become a good "boat handler" (i.e. use of a spring line, turning you boat with in it's length, application of Prop Walk...).

You want to be a good docker get your boat and learn how she reacts if you back up or go forward at slow RPM. Then use this info to apply to your movement in our out of confined space.

I have not seen classes of 15 students a good teacher to student ratio to impart good docking skills. 60 minutes you in your baot with a competent seaman and you'll become a "good" docker. At least for 85% of the time you have to dock. The other 15% is practice skill built and involves the times you are not likely to be out on your boat.
Which is one of the reasons to take the class. The person I was in my 20s is not the person I am now. In my 20s, I wasn't interested in getting to know my boat, now, I'll practice until I get good at it. Now I'm willing to pay someone to teach me things like docking. Do I know how to sail? Technically yeah, could I use some basic lessons, absolutely!