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Hunter 27 Cherubini: Things to Look for When buying

May 23, 2020
6
Hunter 27 MD
Hi All.
Looking at a Hunter 27 1978, Cherubini model.
Seems well kept. Tiller. Repowered.
Any specific issues to look for on these boats?
Thanks!
Hope to contribute back to this community once I have a boat and know something!!
 
May 24, 2004
6,635
CC 30 South Florida
Check that the slide door for the head and v-berth slide freely, otherwise you have a bowing mast support column. Check the condition of the deck and cockpit scoopers and hoses. Check all the gate thru-hall valves; if they are still there they need to be replaced "stat". Get a dock hose and spray the deck to check for water leaks; pay special attention to the forward hatch and the portholes. The sails are a big ticket item, check their condition on the sea trial. Check the tension and condition of the standing rigging wires. The boat was built like a tank because at the time they did not know better, it is very stable and forgiving, Enjoy.
 
May 23, 2020
6
Hunter 27 MD
Thanks for reply.
What does "gate thru-hull valves" mean. If original?
Sails should be good, newer and from a good loft.
What are the cockpit scoopers and hoses (like fuel hose?)? I've sailed quite a bit, but haven't bought a boat before..
Will check the bathroom door.... makes sense about any compression related to sliding... thanks for the tip!
 
Nov 8, 2007
1,373
Hunter 27_75-84 Sandusky Harbor Marina, Ohio
Cockpit scuppers are the two drains in the aft end of the cockpit. Hoses from these drains exit at two holes at the bottom of the stern. If they leak, near hull speed, a wave rises at the stern and can flood the boat. The hoses must be in good shape, and double clamped at both ends. You can get to them through the lazarette, or by taking out the bulkhead at the back of the quarter berth.

A sticking door to the head also indicates rot of the wood in the mast step in the deck over the compression post and cross timber above the door. If this is the case the ceiling will look like it is oozing around the cross piece above the sliding door. There is a description of our repair in the archives. But this would be a major item to negotiate if the survey indicates it.

The toerail/hull-topsides joint is another source if leaks. The list of possible issues is long. That’s why you want a survey in your deal. (Typically, you pay for it, then negotiate the cost of repair of major items by you or the current owner out of the purchase price.)

A gate valve is the kind of valve most of us have on the outdoor water tap in our homes. You turn a round handle multiple times to move a “gate” that opens or closes off water flow. There are two on our ‘77 model, one where the sink drain goes through the hull, and the other at the engine cooling water intake. In salt water they corrode, and can fail without warning. The replacement is a ball valve that closes or opens with about a quarter turn of a lever that turns a ball with a hole in it to either align with the pipe, or block it. In fresh water for 43 years disassembly and inspection shows ours are fine. SOP on a salt water boat is to replace them. A feasible do it yourself job on the hard, (out of the water) but you have to get it exactly right. Again, the procedure is in the forum archives.

The reward is a great, seaworthy cruising boat for two to four. The Admiral and I have cruised around 9,000 miles on ours over 20 years on Lakes Erie, St. Clair, and Huron. We have cruised with four (two couples grandsons, or my brothers and Dad) for up to a week. I hope this one works out for you. Keep asking questions, we are always here to help you out.
 
May 23, 2020
6
Hunter 27 MD
You're a saint. Thanks for the time to answer.
Will check these things as you stated tomorrow.
I think I've found a fairly well loved one with many updates, but still the potential for lingering old things on an old boat.
I think it had a survey when last sold less than 10 years ago.
 
May 27, 2004
1,619
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
In addition to the cabin top "sag", have the surveyor check the mast step in the bilge. On my H30C, it was rusting away and the plywood sub floor was soft.
 
May 24, 2004
6,635
CC 30 South Florida
A 10 year old survey is just as helpful as a 10 year old Chest X-Ray. Get a survey done, at risk is not only the purchase price but a couple thousand dollars above it and a headache if it has to be scrapped. It will be helpful in getting insurance.
 
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May 27, 2004
1,619
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
That was a great write up on the things you found that need attention.
Please consider posting this write up with the pics in the "Owners Mods" section of this forum.

You didn't mention anything electrical, so I'll add that when you or any owner
of an older boat consider rewiring, try to get the wiring diagram, or at least ask the forum
for color codes on the circuits for the particular boat.
Knowing what color hot wire goes to what fixture can save a great deal of time and aggravation.
 
Jun 5, 2010
1,015
Hunter 25 0 Burlington NJ
Cabintop sag is not a deadly problem at all; but it does require unstepping the mast and doing some serious remedial work to the deck. There are ways to do this and ways to make a sheer mess of it. The ONLY way I have found is to fill the rotten deck core under the mast step with an epoxy mix. Cutting out material and installing blocks of whatever (I have even heard of people using Starboard!) is NOT a long-term or reliable fix. A fiberglass boat is what's known as a stressed-skin structure - that goes for the deck as well as the hull. Point-loading one without adequate reinforcement (spread over a large area of the skin) is never good.

The structure of the deck relies on the support in the bilge (point-loading = bad), the properties of the compression post (everything in column), and the adequacy of the deck strata at the mast step (solid with no 'give'). The epoxy method I always advocate permits the rest of the deck to remain stiff and impervious to water saturation (prime reason for soft decks) and therefore consistently strong. Dented deck under the mast means this has failed - VERY common with 40-plus-year-old boats like we are seeing, after years of having clueless owners drilling into the deck to install hardware and especially when silicone has been used as a sealant. But is is TOTALLY fixable by the DIY-er and totally reliable if one does it right. Therefore it's a good boat-buying tactic to not mention it and to get a much lower price (like buying a guitar with missing strings or a bicycle with flat tires).

The H27 is a nice little boat. If it's got this problem, you can rescue it from a fate worse than death. Good luck.