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Hunter 23.5 Trailer Bearings and Brake Parts

Sep 30, 2016
244
Hunter 23.5 Oasis Patoka Lake, IN
I have a 1995 Hunter 23.5, and I assume the stock trailer that came with it. Is it futile to expect the bearing seals to keep water out? And therefore, is it standard to just repack them on a regular basis? I pretty much use the trailer for just putting it in and taking it out and the ends of the summer season.

Last fall I repacked them and they looked good (no rust or other wear signs). But there was lots of water in the hub. I was thinking of replacing the seals, but then thought it probably wont do any good anyway.

Second question. When I was repacking the bearings last fall, I noticed a lot of brake fluid coming out of one wheel cylinder. How do I go about ordering a new set of cylinders? Who supplies them?

Thanks
 
Jun 8, 2004
7,769
-na -NA Anywhere USA
Bearing size is 1.98 or two inches. Parts are pretty much standard for trailers. Hunter made your trailer. If you can take one off to show that would help referring to cylinder to be sure what we are looking at. Also do you have brakes?
 
Aug 22, 2017
1,589
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
Bearing Buddies are an accessory that you can add to the trailer hubs. They are a spring loaded grease cavity that gets filled using a common Zerk fitting grease gun that is available at most any auto parts store. Once the cavity is pumped full of grease, the bearings are then constantly packed with grease that is under spring pressure. The positive pressure of the grease keeps the water out. The only down side to these things is that if your seals leak, then the grease gets on your wheels.

I would install new seals first, then add bearing buddies.

As Dave said, trailer parts are fairly standard. I can drive a trailer over to my local trailer supply shop, & they guys there can just look at what I have, then hand me the correct bearings, seals, hubs, etc. The bearings themselves will normally have a part number etched into the race. Once you have that number, then any bearing supplier should be able to get you an exact match. 44643 is a common 1” bearing that is used in trailer hubs. 47048 is a common 1-1/4” bearing that is used in trailer hubs. 25580 is a common 1-3/4” bearing that is used in trailer hubs with brakes. Numbers that are at the end like 2RS or 1Z, just indicate different types of seals that are on the outside of the bearings. Those seals can be pried off if they are not needed. For trailer use, you want open bearings with no seals on them.
 
Last edited:
Mar 21, 2017
14
None 30 Usa
For a Brg Buddy application or not, U want the lip of the seal facing out, (toward the atmosphere) when u are going to sink the hub frequently. U want to keep water out, yes u will sling a little grease.
U need a slight amount of bearing end play after u have tightened the nut to bout 50#, back it of 1 flat should give u a slight end play (.002-.006).
Don't sink the hub immediately after a long drive, the quick cool down will suck water in.
Bill, retired
 
Aug 22, 2017
1,589
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
I agree about the bearings needing a little end play.

I disagree about positioning the seals to keep things out rather than in, if you are using the bearing buddies. With the bearing buddies, you have an excess of pressurized grease inside the bearing cavity. The internal pressure will keep the water out. If the bearing buddies were not installed, then I would see the wisdom in what you suggest.
 
Last edited:
Mar 21, 2017
14
None 30 Usa
I think U intended to use my method, W/O Brg Buddy
No problem, we all have our opinions, biggest thing don't forget those wheel brgs. They can ruine a day or more.
Blll