HANK ON JIB SAIL SHEETS

Aug 11, 2011
662
O'day 30 313 Georgetown MD
Once this pandemic is over and recreational boating and crossing state lines is again allowed, i'm going to have a maiden voyage under sail. It will be the first time I will sail with a hank on jib. My boat came with two jib sails, a 130 and a 90. My previous boat had a Roller Furler, so it was easy to trim the Genoa to balance the boat. Now I have hank on sails. Should I have separate sets of sheets already attached for each sail or should I have one set of sheets and using a large caribiner clip, make it interchangeable. Thoughts?
This is wishing a happy holiday to all. Hope you are all keeping safe and following the suggested isolation strategies. It's just like sailing. Think every move through.
 
May 1, 2011
2,326
Pearson 37 Lusby MD
I'd think the caribiner clip might make a great head knocker if the clue of the jib gets away from you. :banghead:
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,150
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Good question.

First I favor a “soft shackle”
9C465C05-8B8A-4872-A9B9-2EC470D6393B.jpeg

to a carabiner or snap shackle. When I go forward to reef a jib it usually when the wind is blowing. As the jib is loosened it starts to flog about, whipping the clew about. That chunk of metal whipping about always scares me. The soft shackle is much easier on my hands. It is just as quick to change as a snap shackle and quicker than a carabiner.

Drop the jib to the reef point tie off the tack, switch the sheet to the reef clew, tighten the sail halyard. Then head back to the cockpit.
 
Jan 1, 2006
6,101
Slickcraft 26 Greenport, NY
Soft shackles. You don't want a big metal carabiner clip flogging around on a foredeck even if no one is up there. On the last boat I sailed on that had jib hanks, we would hank on the jib and run sheets. Even on that 23' boat the various jibs had different leads so they would have needed to be re -led anyway. The skipper wouldn't have left his sheets out in the Sun. If you do, you need UV resistant covers. Most furling sheets live in the Sun 24/7.
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,150
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Sheets are a consumable on my sail boat. I use polyester line that has some but minimal stretch. At $0.62 to $0.76 a foot it’s not a deal breaker to the Cruise kitty.
 
Sep 25, 2008
923
Macgregor & Island Packet VENTURE 25 & IP-38 NORTH EAST, MD
One "set" ( a port and a starboard) tied to the clew with a bowline. Drop the sail, untie the sheets, secure the working ends (I like a simple knot to the spinnaker pole eye on the mast), roll sail up to forestay and un hank it, remove sail from deck and place new sail at forestay, attach tack, halyard and hanks, unroll towards mast, tie sheets to clew and raise the sail. Having a jib trimmer back in the cockpit will make things must easier too! A video is worth a thousand (or more) words. ;)

 
Jan 1, 2006
6,101
Slickcraft 26 Greenport, NY
You can bring the new sail up on deck while still using the sail that is going to be changed out. Unclip 3 or so lower hanks on the existing sail and clip on the new sail's hanks, attach the tack and run the sheets. Before furling and double foil tracks crews were pretty adroit at this. They would go without a headsail for only 30 seconds or so. Could make or brake a race. But I don't think we're talking about racing here.
 
Aug 11, 2011
662
O'day 30 313 Georgetown MD
I'll be using sailbags attached to the forward life lines and pulpit for easier stowing. I like the soft shackle. Will get a bunch of them. I'm sure I''l loose a few while I gain experience. Thanks everyone for your input.
 
Sep 15, 2013
690
Catalina 270 Baltimore
I had hank on sails on my previous boat. I used a large snap shackle to attach my sheets to the sail. I got bopped once or twice by it and today I would definitely use a soft shackle. I have made many of them of different sizes. There are plenty of resources on the web on how to make them. Definitely easier than using individual sets of sheets for each sail.
 

Dave Groshong

SBO Staff
Staff member
Jan 25, 2007
1,795
Catalina 22 Seattle
I favor a sheet for each side, a set for each sail, 10mm on that boat, tied with a bowline.
 
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Jan 1, 2006
6,101
Slickcraft 26 Greenport, NY
tw.odz..., my wife sewed up a sailbag to store our 135 in on the bow. The plans were from Sailrite. I liked very much. I could drop the sail, flake it practically from the cockpit, roll it forward in a few big folds and zip into the bag in no time. Hanks stay on the forestay remain attached and sheets remain attached. Leaving to go sailing was even easier. Unzip the bag and remove and hoist.
 
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Joe

.
Jun 1, 2004
7,457
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
I favor a sheet for each side, a set for each sail, 10mm on that boat, tied with a bowline.
Same here. Except you don't need to change sheets when you change sails, and don't stow the sheets in the bag with the sail. Shackles are unnecessary on jib sheets. A proper bowline knot, separate sheets.... hmmn.. I posted this comment almost verbatim in another thread a day or two back. I believe the recommendation was: separate sheets, fixed with bowline knots, equipped with a simple jib downhaul for easier handling on the drop and security on deck. badda bing badda bang...:biggrin:
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,150
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
I like the soft shackle. Will get a bunch of them
It is not difficult to learn to make them. The line cost is $2-5 depending on the line you use ( I prefer dyneema) plus maybe 90 minutes of your time to learn to tie the first one. The diameter of the dyneema will determine the strength. A finished soft shackle can exceed the breaking strength of a metal snap shackle that can cost hundreds of dollars.

I have posted a youtube link of instructions to make your own a couple of times here on SBO. If interested and can find it, PM me and I’ll send it to you.
 
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