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Furling mast, weird switch

Oct 29, 2016
1,606
Hunter 41 DS Port Huron
Ratchet and free??
In one position will prevent the sail from furling out and in the other it will allow the sail to furled out, needed for when your main is furled in on a reef
 
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capta

.
Jun 4, 2009
3,998
Pearson 530 Admiralty Bay, Bequia SVG
It is a Hood Stoway system and that engages the electric drive or disengages it for manual operation. The lower plate with all the 1/4X20 machine screws houses the motor and there should be a socket for a winch handle on the front of the mast opposite the boom. Be aware that the reduction gear for the motor to the foil is irreplaceable, so make sure you check it frequently and keep it well lubed. It is connected directly to the top of the motor, then to the plate in the mast. Keep everything well lubed and use a copper based anti-seize compound on all the machine screws that hold all the pieces together. It is a fantastic system if you take care of it, but it will start getting expensive real fast if you don't.
 
Last edited:
Aug 22, 2020
7
Hinckley B40 Royal Oak
Thanks! I have it in the middle position, not latched at either end of the S and I can furl and unfurl just fine. I will need to fiddle with it a bit more to understand it. Maybe I can find an old user manual online. Good info on keeping it lubed up.
 

capta

.
Jun 4, 2009
3,998
Pearson 530 Admiralty Bay, Bequia SVG
There is no middle position. You just don't have it locked in place. It is either on electric or manual.
 
Aug 22, 2020
7
Hinckley B40 Royal Oak
OK, thanks. I have it *not* on either end of the S slot rather than what the photo shows, and it furls and unfurls just fine. Very confusing. (I found the old Hood Stoway manual online, but it does not mention such a switch.)
 

capta

.
Jun 4, 2009
3,998
Pearson 530 Admiralty Bay, Bequia SVG
OK, thanks. I have it *not* on either end of the S slot rather than what the photo shows, and it furls and unfurls just fine. Very confusing. (I found the old Hood Stoway manual online, but it does not mention such a switch.)
Let me put it another way. I'm pretty sure that you do not have it fully engaged in that position and it might be doing damage.
 
Aug 22, 2020
7
Hinckley B40 Royal Oak
So for anybody else who has this question years from now, here is the answer, thanks to Mike Bickford at Campbell’s Boatyard in Oxford, MD. The switch in the lower position allows the furling motor to work in or out. In the upper position, the switch locks the motor to prevent the sail from unfurling or furling (handy with a reef set). The middle position has no effect and is the same as the lower position, but you run the risk of the switch sliding up into the locked position accidentally. To engage the switch, you have to bump the furling motor a tad one way or the other.
 

capta

.
Jun 4, 2009
3,998
Pearson 530 Admiralty Bay, Bequia SVG
So for anybody else who has this question years from now, here is the answer, thanks to Mike Bickford at Campbell’s Boatyard in Oxford, MD. The switch in the lower position allows the furling motor to work in or out. In the upper position, the switch locks the motor to prevent the sail from unfurling or furling (handy with a reef set). The middle position has no effect and is the same as the lower position, but you run the risk of the switch sliding up into the locked position accidentally. To engage the switch, you have to bump the furling motor a tad one way or the other.
Then I take it that you have no manual drive? If that's true, then you best pick up a spare motor and gearbox.
 

capta

.
Jun 4, 2009
3,998
Pearson 530 Admiralty Bay, Bequia SVG
Then that switch moves it from manual to electric. If left in the manual position it will unfurl unless you drop the lock on the crank mechanism. It will also unfurl in the electric position in stronger winds, but very slowly, against the gearbox and the motor.