Furling Jib for a H-212 ????

Aug 22, 2017
1,608
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
I’m thinking of replacing the jib on my 212. Right now, I have a hank on. I’m thinking that I would like to have a furler, but I want one that isn’t going to be a pain in the neck to handle when I step the mast. I’m thinking that something like what I have seen on a Code 0 might be nice. I want something with no rigid tube or other structure in the center. I want something that I can hoist with the existing halyard. I’m thinking of staying with stock jib dimensions, so I & J would be roughly 21’ & 8’. Is something like that out there? Is it readily available? If so, what is the cost likely to be & where is a good place to find it?
Thanks,
Jim
 
Oct 31, 2012
437
Hunter 2008 H25 Lake Wabamun
My recommendation is to replace your jib on a proper roller furler for ease of use and adjustible for high wind conditions. A code O is a fantastic “light wind” sail but not suitable for winds above 10 knots. You will need a second halyard and a continuous roller furler for the Code 0. Also a bow sprit is useful to fly the larger Code 0 from. You can see how I set my sprit and Code 0 up on the attached video.
 
Aug 22, 2017
1,608
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
Thanks for the reply. It looks like you have done some nice machine work there. My compliments.

I may not have been clear in stating my intentions. I don't plan to fly a code 0 & I don't plan to run the jib partially furled. I'm just looking for a quick & easy single-handed way to deploy the jib when I want her & get her out of the wind when I don't want her in harm's way. The little Hunter 170 has something similar to the kind of rig that I am looking for, but that little jib is only about 19' x 5.5' & the head stay runs up inside the luff. I'm looking to leave my head stay as it is & run the furling sail inside of it. I was hoping that a 21 x 8' jib might be small enough to let me get away with a rig like that, but with a rope up the luff to the halyard rather than a cable.

Is that sort of thing out there? Or am I looking for Sasquatch?

Edit:
Before, I just fast forwarded to the part of that video with the furler in it. I just watched the rest of that video now. Wow! You did A LOT of really nice work on that thing. American craftsmanship is not dead after all. Very nicely done.
 
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Oct 19, 2017
6,936
O'Day 19 Littleton, NH
This is not the right size jib for you, but it might give you some idea of what a used one would cost. https://m.ebay.com/itm/Roller-Furli...-Resale-Shop-of-TX-1708-2055-91-/372243107344

$210 for 30' x 10' roller furling jib.

BTW. They aren't that difficult to install. A halyard with swivel and solid bottom chain plate plus whatever deck hardware you want for bringing control to the cockpit. The swivel should go most of the way to the top, or you can twist the halyard in the pulley.

- Will (Dragonfly)
 
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Aug 22, 2017
1,608
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
Thanks Will. That gives me a bit of perspective. I'm actually looking to get something a little closer to new or actually new.

I've been doing some googling. I'm thinking that a Furlex 30s might be what I am looking for. http://www.seldenmast.com/files/1503923989/597-130-E.pdf One thing in that document has me scratching my head though. On the bottom of page 2, between the picture of the drum with tack fitting & the picture of the tapered top swivel, there is something that they call a Halyard swivel. I am not familiar with that part. I have always seen swivels that were like the one on the right or ones that attached around a center tube of some sort. Can anyone explain to me what the difference is with that “Halyard swivel”? From looking at the picture, I am not understanding the purpose for having something that is different from the tapered top swivel.

Thanks,
Jim
 
Apr 27, 2010
1,157
Hunter 23 Lake Wallenpaupack
I'm not familiar with the type of furler that has no foil, as this appears to be. However, it looks like the top swivel may attach the forestay to the mast clevis pin, and the halyard swivel is pulled up by the halyard and in turn pulls up the jib by being attached to the head. It appears that the halyard attaches to the rope loop on the swivel and the shackle at the bottom to the grommet on the sail. Like the swivel on my "traditional" furler with foils, the lower part can rotate as the drum winds up the sail while the upper part is stationary, preventing the halyard from wrapping around the stay. Exactly how the drum can roll up the sail when there is no foil confuses me.
 
Aug 22, 2017
1,608
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
... Exactly how the drum can roll up the sail when there is no foil confuses me.
Thank you for the reply.

On my little 170, the head stay is inside the luff of the jib. On that boat, the drum spins the head stay & causes the jib to wrap around the head stay. The head stay has a swivel at the top. Basically, the head stay is the foil in that system. I am hoping to get away with using the same trick on this slightly larger boat, except with only using the tension of a halyard, rather than a stay.
 
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Apr 27, 2010
1,157
Hunter 23 Lake Wallenpaupack
What holds the head of the jib up in your 170? If it has a halyard, what keeps it from wrapping? I suspect if you don't have a halyard that may explain the difference, the need for a halyard swivel on this larger furler model.
 
Aug 22, 2017
1,608
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
On the H-170, there is no halyard for the jib. The head stay runs inside the jib. The jib is attached to it.
 
Jun 8, 2004
8,881
-na -NA Anywhere USA
You could attach the blocks for an extra halyard to put up another sail and running it down the mast to a swivel style cam cleat to lower and raise quickly.
 
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Aug 22, 2017
1,608
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
Dave, thanks for chiming in.
Unfortunately, I'm not understanding your suggestion. Is that a suggestion for the 170 or the 212?
 
Jun 25, 2004
1,108
Corsair F24 Mk1 003 San Francisco Bay, CA
Thanks Will. That gives me a bit of perspective. I'm actually looking to get something a little closer to new or actually new.

I've been doing some googling. I'm thinking that a Furlex 30s might be what I am looking for. http://www.seldenmast.com/files/1503923989/597-130-E.pdf One thing in that document has me scratching my head though. On the bottom of page 2, between the picture of the drum with tack fitting & the picture of the tapered top swivel, there is something that they call a Halyard swivel. I am not familiar with that part. I have always seen swivels that were like the one on the right or ones that attached around a center tube of some sort. Can anyone explain to me what the difference is with that “Halyard swivel”? From looking at the picture, I am not understanding the purpose for having something that is different from the tapered top swivel.

Thanks,
Jim
A halyard swivel allows you to hoist and remove the jib from the forestay without disconnecting the forestay.

Your sailmaker will construct the jib with a zippered sleeve or clips on the luff. A zippered sleeve goes around the forestay. Clips attach to the forestay. Kind of like hanks do, but less lumpy. Zipper sleeves work well. Clips sometime come off.

After the mast is raised using the bare forstay, you attach the halyard swivel to the halyard and the head of the jib. As you hoist the sail up, you pull the zipper down, which closes the sleeve around the forestay. Once the sail is hoisted, you can furl it.

To remove the jib, reverse the process: Unfurl the sail. Lower it using halyard and halyard swivel while you unzip the sleeve (or disengage the clips). Then lower the mast using the bare forestay.

There are a few important technical details.The halyard swivel has to be installed on the forestay before the end terminals are swaged on to the forestay. You will need to get a new forestay.The sail must unfurl in a clockwise direction leaving from the starboard side of the head stay (uv cover must be on the starboard side) to be compatible with the lay of the wire. Typically there is a special tang required on the tack of the jib to encourage smooth furling.

small-boat-furling.jpg
 
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Aug 22, 2017
1,608
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
Thank you Judy. That method does not match what I had envisioned, but it does meet my needs. It will allow me to put up just the head stay & leave the jib off when I just want a main. It will also allow me to have an easy-to-deploy & recover head sail when I want one there.

That's actually perfect for me. I had not seen it done that way before.