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Fantasia 35 Hull #7

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Jun 17, 2009
6
Fantasia 35 Cruising, Panama
Hi all:
I just located this forum and read the other posts.
We have owned Inshallah of San Francisco a Fantasia 35 since 1976 and lived aboard and cruised her since then.
She is presently on the hard in Panama while we visit the US.
Over the decades Inshallah has undergone extensive modifications and refits included extending the keel aft by 3 feet and installing a 4 foot s/s bowsprit. After all that she is perfectly balanced.
We would be happy to share information on the Fantasia for anyone interested.

Cheers, Terry
 
Jan 22, 2008
78
TUNG HWA FANTASIA 35 MKII Miami, FL
Hello

Hi Terry

I hadn't signed on in a while and just found your message.

Glad to see you here.

I have been considering at some point adding a bowsprit. I was
wondering if you had any photos you could send.

capjules@hotmail.com

Thanks

Jules







Hi all:
I just located this forum and read the other posts.
We have owned Inshallah of San Francisco a Fantasia 35 since 1976 and lived aboard and cruised her since then.
She is presently on the hard in Panama while we visit the US.
Over the decades Inshallah has undergone extensive modifications and refits included extending the keel aft by 3 feet and installing a 4 foot s/s bowsprit. After all that she is perfectly balanced.
We would be happy to share information on the Fantasia for anyone interested.

Cheers, Terry
 
Jun 17, 2009
6
Fantasia 35 Cruising, Panama
Fantasia 35 Bowsprit

Hey Jules:
Always good to make contact with a fellow Fantasia 35 owner.
I would be happy to help you in any way I can.

The bowsprit was installed in Venezuela in 1991 ?? before we had digital cameras.
I will search current photos to see what I have that might be of use. My guess is that most photos will be too far away to give any construction detail.

I thought the Fantasia MkII had the balance, weather helm, problem solved. Why would you want a bowsprit?

The basic bowsprit plan is as follows. You can find many sprits like this on other vessels.

Material is 2 inch SS pipe (pipe=thick wall material; SS tube= thin wall)
The shape is a half loop designed to extend 4 feet beyond the original head stay attachment.

Hull attachment: The pipe is welded to 1/2 inch SS plates which were drilled for 3/8 inch thru bolts. These plates were thru bolted and back plated to the gunnel above deck level perhaps 2 feet aft along the gunnel. Inside the gunnel was filled with teak and epoxy mash to prevent compression from the thru bolts.

The bobstay is 3/4 inch rod attached just above the water line to a 1/2 inch SS "Y" shaped plate with the wings of the "Y" inside the hull and the attachment tang going thru the hull. This is thru bolted and epoxied inside the full.

Since installation I have have only one problem with the bowsprit. After about 15 years the lower plate began to leak when underway. The solution was an external SS cover plate with a slot to fit the lower tang and shaped to fit the hull. It was attached with self tapping screws and caulking.

Cheers, Terry <tittletattles@yahoo.com>
 
Jul 30, 2009
2
2 c22 Fresno, CA
Hi Terry
I'm curious about the Fantasia as I'm shopping for a WS 32 in the bay area (sfo) at this time.
How is the durability compared to the WS? Also, these are Taiwan made, how is the quality?
The design looks great. We intend to cruise with 4 on board, a teen, pre teen, mom and Dad (me).
From what I can tell the cabin layout looks nice.
Any advise for a potential buyer?
Steve
 
Jan 22, 2008
78
TUNG HWA FANTASIA 35 MKII Miami, FL
Hi,

I have a 1980 MKII model, bought it last year, had same owner since 1984, very well maitained and upgraded over the years.

as far as I can tell the boat is bullet proof !! built rock solid in every area.

and the engine is very easy to work on. good access all around. spacious engine room.

no deck delamination, coming up on 30 years old now.

and it's the best interior lay out I have ever seen in a 35 footer.

the divided v berths are good for kids as we have a boy and a girl, we hang courtains on each side like a train bunk to give them privacy.

if you not too tall or big the aft double is OK. I'm 5'11" and my wife is 5'2" and we do OK. It's a little tight but we manage. or if you have two boys put them in the back and you and your wife up front.

and the storage space on this boat is unbelievable, double closet up front, double closet in the rear, cabintes and drawers all over the place, huge head with tons of storage, a good space under the floor, under the, v berth, under the aft berths, under the settees, behind the setees and on and on.... really really amazing.

good luck with that.

any other questions feel free

Jules
 
Jan 22, 2008
78
TUNG HWA FANTASIA 35 MKII Miami, FL
Re: Fantasia 35 Bowsprit

Hi Terry

was thinking of the bowsprit to increase sail area for lighter air

but I think I'll get a drifter and try it as is first.

thanks for the info.

Jules
 
Jul 30, 2009
2
2 c22 Fresno, CA
Hi,
as far as I can tell the boat is bullet proof !! built rock solid in every area.
Is the hull solid or cored?
Do they have that solid feel of the WS 32?

no deck delamination, coming up on 30 years old now.
Is delaminarion a common problem?
What other problems are common with this boat? (they all have problems)

and it's the best interior lay out I have ever seen in a 35 footer.
the divided v berths are good for kids as we have a boy and a girl, we hang courtains on each side like a train bunk to give them privacy.
We have a boy and a girl also, your remedy sounds great!

if you not too tall or big the aft double is OK. I'm 5'11" and my wife is 5'2" and we do OK. It's a little tight but we manage. or if you have two boys put them in the back and you and your wife up front.
5'9" and 5'6"

any other questions feel free
Jules
Thanks Steve
 
Jun 17, 2009
6
Fantasia 35 Cruising, Panama
Bowsprit and drifter

Hi Terry

was thinking of the bowsprit to increase sail area for lighter air

but I think I'll get a drifter and try it as is first.

thanks for the info.

Jules
Hi Jules...I agree with the drifter idea. If the boat is balanced while sailing I would not disturb the CE (Center of effort).

We have a 180% MPS Drifter and it works well except for beating. The truth is that we have used it perhaps 10 times in 33 years. The problem is that you have to get it down before the wind gets too heavy or you have a fight on your hands. Our rule is to get it down at 15 knots of wind. Terry
 
Jun 17, 2009
6
Fantasia 35 Cruising, Panama
Fantasia vs West Sail

Hi Terry
I'm curious about the Fantasia as I'm shopping for a WS 32 in the bay area (sfo) at this time.
How is the durability compared to the WS? Also, these are Taiwan made, how is the quality?
The design looks great. We intend to cruise with 4 on board, a teen, pre teen, mom and Dad (me).
From what I can tell the cabin layout looks nice.
Any advise for a potential buyer?
Steve
Hey, Cheepguy.... From Cedar Mountain in North Carolina... raining

Where in SF Bay Area? We are originally from Alameda. Inshallah's first birth was Ballena Bay Marina, Alameda from which we departed in 1980 with three daughters on board 11 - 13 -15 yrs.

Advice --- you have to get aboard a Fantasia, inside it, to experience it. Jules is right. There is something magical about the interior design for a 35 footer.

WESTSAIL: Many are quite different because many were owner built from the hull up. The hulls and decks are very strong. The interiors can be works of art to plywood junk yards.

A friend of ours built his WS from a bare hull in Alabama, launched her and sailed her via Mexico to St John USVI where he settled down. After about 20 years she was thrown on the beach by a hurricane and later refloated. Last year I saw this same vessel, INFINI, in Colombia and Panama in the hands of a young man on his way to Vanuatu. She was in rough shape but she was making the voyage just fine. He had little money and decided he would rather voyage than repair Infini.

FANTASIA:
Fantasia durability, and Tiawan: over time every boat has problems no matter where it is built.

HULL is similar to WS. One inch glass at the keel and 5/8" at the gunnel. Inshallah has been on two reefs over the years and both times escaped with minor damage. No hull delamination as many Fantasias were built before the industry changed the formula for the resin that caused the problems.

ELECTRICS: In 1975 I was worried and continued to worry about the electrics in the Tiawan bulit boat and nothing has failed. False worry.
Quality of the workmanship is wonderful; the teak joinery a work of art.

The bad side:
STAINLESS STEEL: made in Tiawan was of poor quality. Much of it has failed, cracked, broken, etc. Any SS that is related to safety should be replaced, the rest of it you can just keep polishing.

SS CHAIN PLATES: The thru the deck chain plates are a poor design as they leaked and I finally replaced them outboard the hull and much larger than the originals. Fully 30% of the plates and fastenings had flaws that were only evident once removed.

IRON FUEL TANK: In time (25-30 yrs) the iron fuel tanks rust and will need replacing and that means removing part of the main cabin.

ENGINE: The "Pisces" (Izusu): The Izusu part was fantastic and never missed a beat in over 25 year. Everything that "Pisces" attached to marinize it failed, some many, many times. One gets to be a good mechanic.

WOOD MAST (only on the early models, alum later): Well built but needed rebuilding after 25 years. The wood mast is still in Inshallah after 34 years. Vessels with wooden masts seem to have less violent motion at sea or at anchor because of the weight aloft.

PLYWOOD: Plywood in a marine environment delaminates after about 20-30 years. The glues break down over time. Some of it is very difficult to deal with as it is the foundation for something else, i.e. cabin sole, etc.

WEATHER HELM ON EARLY MODELS: Bruce Bingham, the Fantasia designer, was a genius at interior design and an idiot at hull/sailing design. The CE (center of effort) was designed wrong by over 20%. We fought the weather helm from SF to Europe and back to the Caribbean before we solved it it.To cure the problem we added a 4 foot bowsprit and later we added 3 feet to the aft end of the keel. We removed the rudder and interior steering gear, added 3 feet to the keel and then replaced the rudder at the aft end of the new keel. Inshallah will now steer herself for days at a time. She now sails at least a full knot faster than before the alterations and much more comfortably.

LIVING ABOARD WITH KIDS: (What are the ages and sexs?)
Having had some small experience in living with teenagers aboard a small vessel I have a piece of advice. For adult and teenage sanity you each have to be able to get away from the other. I would buy a vessel where you and your wife can have a separate cabin from the main cabin, and it should have a separate cabin from the main cabin for the kids. Everyone needs their privacy. You will love yourself later. This was our intention when we bought Inshallah but we had no idea how important it was.
Over the years we have know many WS 32 owners and none of them had an aft cabin. They had a fore cabin and a main salon. The aft cockpit precluded that design, although I suppose it is possible.
The Fantasia interior design is one of the best I have seen in a 35 footer. The aft cabin is a refuge for the adults. The forepeak a refuge for the kids. The main salon and cockpit are a common area for everyone including guests.

Just for the fun of it, before you buy a vessel without separate areas for all the adversaries, try moving into a area of your house that has the square footage of your intended vessel -- two areas like the main cabin and forepeak. Remember the main cabin doubles as the kitchen so you have to make one of the areas next to the stove and frig. If you have a large kitchen, you could separate off a section of the kitchen for whoever intends to live in the forepeak, the others live/sleep in the stove/frig area. If the kitchen is small, you could set up the hallway as the forepeak area. Remember, no one gets to live outside the assigned area with the exception of going outside the house whenever one wants to.
When you get used to that, pretend the Jolly Green Giant picks up the house and shakes the hell out of it to simulate a storm -- hang on.

Oh, and start your home schooling early to give yourself time to iron out the wrinkles. We found it more difficult than we thought but well worth it.

If you are seriously considering a Fantasia and you have not seen a Fantasia, and I mean the interior and exterior, I recommend that you do. One cannot imagine the difference from other 35 footers without experiencing it. As a liveaboard vessel for a family of four I think the Fantasia is head and shoulders above the usual WS.

Hope that helps some....Terry and Laurie and Ariel (Schipperke)
 
Jan 22, 2008
78
TUNG HWA FANTASIA 35 MKII Miami, FL
MKI MKII Different Yards

Hi Cheepguy,

at one point the fantasia production went to the Tung Hwa Ship yard where some of the quality problems may have been worked out, for instance;

my boat has all the original stainless on it, the only thing that needs replacing at this point is the bow and stern rails but for coastal cruising for now they're still fine. I've owned the boat for a year and a half and done no metal polishing and all the metal is still looking good, that's very good quality stainless. my Oday 39 made in USA needed full metal polishing at least every six months otherwise it was covered in rust stains.

and it has the original standing rigging, no broken strands, no cracked swages, I've had it surveyed twice.

my survey showed no plywood problems and I'm always poking around the boat and
have found none myself.

my chain plates don't leak, they have some surface corrosion so someone
did not rebed often enough in the past but no pitted corrosion, and they don't
leak now, they are easy to inspect for leaks. I pulled one out to comply with my survey and it was fine and intend to start pulling the rest out one at a time to see how the hidden area looks as that is where they would break. don't know if the design on my boat is different than Terry's, but I would not change the set up of the chainplates on my boat and they seem quite substantial for a boat this size.

the fuel tank on my boat was replaced with a 47 gal aluminum tank. and the previous owner was so kind as to leave me detailed instructions as to how he did it and blue prints of the tank he had custom made. let me know if you want a copy.

my boat has it's original Yanmar 33hp fresh water cooled and it's running fine with 3400 hrs on it. same tranny, previous owner replaced the seals at some point, that's it. has only needed routine maintenance.

mine has original aluminum spars, doing fine.

what terry says about the electrical is correct, my boat has all the original wiring and no problems. the ocassional contact needs to be cleaned but that's it.

MKII is a balanced boat, mods that Terry did to his MKI hull are incorporated in the MKII .

previous owner reported that plastic ports just started falling apart and replaced with stainless.

this is the only boat of this type that I have sailed, hunters and odays before this so I can't compare to WS32.

the first thing I noticed is that heels easier at first than those flat bottom boats then it stands up beter to it's sails once heeled.

also it does not pound to weather, first time out in rough weather, to windward, coming over the crest of wave waiting for the typical "BOOOOM" as the hull comes down but nothing, just mashes the water out of the way without a sound, just the water churning about. and no matter how hard we came down the bow never submerged. I had go go up there in the middle of the night to secure an anchor, slid up to the bow on my butt, felt like I was on a roller coaster, up and down, up and down, water flying everywhere, spray flying in my face but I felt very secure.

and no flexing in the hull what so ever, rock solid, no creaking bulkheads at all. I was up in the cockpit amazed that the whole thing was not flexing and creaking as I was used to in those other boats.

hope that helps,

Jules


Hey, Cheepguy.... From Cedar Mountain in North Carolina... raining

Where in SF Bay Area? We are originally from Alameda. Inshallah's first birth was Ballena Bay Marina, Alameda from which we departed in 1980 with three daughters on board 11 - 13 -15 yrs.

Advice --- you have to get aboard a Fantasia, inside it, to experience it. Jules is right. There is something magical about the interior design for a 35 footer.

WESTSAIL: Many are quite different because many were owner built from the hull up. The hulls and decks are very strong. The interiors can be works of art to plywood junk yards.

A friend of ours built his WS from a bare hull in Alabama, launched her and sailed her via Mexico to St John USVI where he settled down. After about 20 years she was thrown on the beach by a hurricane and later refloated. Last year I saw this same vessel, INFINI, in Colombia and Panama in the hands of a young man on his way to Vanuatu. She was in rough shape but she was making the voyage just fine. He had little money and decided he would rather voyage than repair Infini.

FANTASIA:
Fantasia durability, and Tiawan: over time every boat has problems no matter where it is built.

HULL is similar to WS. One inch glass at the keel and 5/8" at the gunnel. Inshallah has been on two reefs over the years and both times escaped with minor damage. No hull delamination as many Fantasias were built before the industry changed the formula for the resin that caused the problems.

ELECTRICS: In 1975 I was worried and continued to worry about the electrics in the Tiawan bulit boat and nothing has failed. False worry.
Quality of the workmanship is wonderful; the teak joinery a work of art.

The bad side:
STAINLESS STEEL: made in Tiawan was of poor quality. Much of it has failed, cracked, broken, etc. Any SS that is related to safety should be replaced, the rest of it you can just keep polishing.

SS CHAIN PLATES: The thru the deck chain plates are a poor design as they leaked and I finally replaced them outboard the hull and much larger than the originals. Fully 30% of the plates and fastenings had flaws that were only evident once removed.

IRON FUEL TANK: In time (25-30 yrs) the iron fuel tanks rust and will need replacing and that means removing part of the main cabin.

ENGINE: The "Pisces" (Izusu): The Izusu part was fantastic and never missed a beat in over 25 year. Everything that "Pisces" attached to marinize it failed, some many, many times. One gets to be a good mechanic.

WOOD MAST (only on the early models, alum later): Well built but needed rebuilding after 25 years. The wood mast is still in Inshallah after 34 years. Vessels with wooden masts seem to have less violent motion at sea or at anchor because of the weight aloft.

PLYWOOD: Plywood in a marine environment delaminates after about 20-30 years. The glues break down over time. Some of it is very difficult to deal with as it is the foundation for something else, i.e. cabin sole, etc.

WEATHER HELM ON EARLY MODELS: Bruce Bingham, the Fantasia designer, was a genius at interior design and an idiot at hull/sailing design. The CE (center of effort) was designed wrong by over 20%. We fought the weather helm from SF to Europe and back to the Caribbean before we solved it it.To cure the problem we added a 4 foot bowsprit and later we added 3 feet to the aft end of the keel. We removed the rudder and interior steering gear, added 3 feet to the keel and then replaced the rudder at the aft end of the new keel. Inshallah will now steer herself for days at a time. She now sails at least a full knot faster than before the alterations and much more comfortably.

LIVING ABOARD WITH KIDS: (What are the ages and sexs?)
Having had some small experience in living with teenagers aboard a small vessel I have a piece of advice. For adult and teenage sanity you each have to be able to get away from the other. I would buy a vessel where you and your wife can have a separate cabin from the main cabin, and it should have a separate cabin from the main cabin for the kids. Everyone needs their privacy. You will love yourself later. This was our intention when we bought Inshallah but we had no idea how important it was.
Over the years we have know many WS 32 owners and none of them had an aft cabin. They had a fore cabin and a main salon. The aft cockpit precluded that design, although I suppose it is possible.
The Fantasia interior design is one of the best I have seen in a 35 footer. The aft cabin is a refuge for the adults. The forepeak a refuge for the kids. The main salon and cockpit are a common area for everyone including guests.

Just for the fun of it, before you buy a vessel without separate areas for all the adversaries, try moving into a area of your house that has the square footage of your intended vessel -- two areas like the main cabin and forepeak. Remember the main cabin doubles as the kitchen so you have to make one of the areas next to the stove and frig. If you have a large kitchen, you could separate off a section of the kitchen for whoever intends to live in the forepeak, the others live/sleep in the stove/frig area. If the kitchen is small, you could set up the hallway as the forepeak area. Remember, no one gets to live outside the assigned area with the exception of going outside the house whenever one wants to.
When you get used to that, pretend the Jolly Green Giant picks up the house and shakes the hell out of it to simulate a storm -- hang on.

Oh, and start your home schooling early to give yourself time to iron out the wrinkles. We found it more difficult than we thought but well worth it.

If you are seriously considering a Fantasia and you have not seen a Fantasia, and I mean the interior and exterior, I recommend that you do. One cannot imagine the difference from other 35 footers without experiencing it. As a liveaboard vessel for a family of four I think the Fantasia is head and shoulders above the usual WS.

Hope that helps some....Terry and Laurie and Ariel (Schipperke)
 
Jan 22, 2008
78
TUNG HWA FANTASIA 35 MKII Miami, FL
Hi Terry,

regarding my stern chain plate, it goes through the deck and the heads of the bolts on mine are behind a very small bulk head just inches from the tip of the stern and seem to be inaccessable.

are yours the same ?

I've looked and looked and don't see any way to get a wrench on the heads without dismantling part of the aft cabin or by cutting a hole in the stern.

any info on this ?

Thanks

Jules
 
Jun 17, 2009
6
Fantasia 35 Cruising, Panama
Aft Chain Plate

Hi Terry,

regarding my stern chain plate, it goes through the deck and the heads of the bolts on mine are behind a very small bulk head just inches from the tip of the stern and seem to be inaccessable.

are yours the same ?

I've looked and looked and don't see any way to get a wrench on the heads without dismantling part of the aft cabin or by cutting a hole in the stern.

any info on this ?

Thanks

Jules
Jules: 8-4-09
Glad to hear that your stainless is better quality. That is a huge plus.

You are correct about the aft chain plate. In 2002 I did a massive refit in Tortola, BVI which included removing all the thru deck chain plates and replacing them with outside the hull chain plates that are thru bolted and back plated.

FYI: Port/Starboard mast chain plates: in our design the heads of the below deck flat head machine screws were poorly bedded in polyester inside the hull between the hull and the back of the blocks where the chain plates are attached. These blocks were inadaquately fiberglassed to the inside of the hull. There was no way to access these screw heads to tighten the nuts should they begin to rotate in the polyester, which some had done. We ended up by boring holes in the outer hull to facilitate removal. Since we removed the inside blocks and fiberglass we finally got to see how the whole thing was assembled.
We never understood it until then; it was really stupid of us. We felt really lucky to have survived 25 years and scads of ocean forces.

"Dismantling the aft cabin": Sometime before 2002 we cut a hole in the bulkhead to the lazarette that is inside the port aft cabinet at the aft end of the aft berth to give more access to the "lazarette". It has been very useful.

We always had a tiny teak door in this bulkhead under these aft cabin cabinets at the foot of the bed. It was not large enough to give access.

Another access hint: In our early cruising we used this a lot. Use a small kid or a gidget of some sort to access these areas. In one case were welded a special tool and taught the kid to use it. Works Great and the kid feels special, which they are.

Your problem is worse than ours since you want to save the parts and replace them. We were removing all the old system. We mechanically removed what we could, but, as I recall, we used a grinder and impact drill to get the final bits out. Sorry, I don't have an answer.

However, I do recall thinking while removing the stern chain plate block that it may have been possible to cut an access hole at the sides or bottom of the block/fiberglass to get to the bolt heads (hex head bolts and washers). Our blocks were approx 3"x3" teak blocks bedded in meshmash and attached to the hull with fiberglass. At the 'V' of the stern, aft of the block there was a tiny space in which the bolt heads waited, similar to what you describe. Good luck.

Cheers, Terry
 
Jan 22, 2008
78
TUNG HWA FANTASIA 35 MKII Miami, FL
aft chain plate

Great idea, I can just cut the whole thing out and mount that chain
plate on the outside. like you said cutting it out is easier than engineering
a way to neatly get the bolts off.

Thanks !



Jules: 8-4-09
Glad to hear that your stainless is better quality. That is a huge plus.

You are correct about the aft chain plate. In 2002 I did a massive refit in Tortola, BVI which included removing all the thru deck chain plates and replacing them with outside the hull chain plates that are thru bolted and back plated.

FYI: Port/Starboard mast chain plates: in our design the heads of the below deck flat head machine screws were poorly bedded in polyester inside the hull between the hull and the back of the blocks where the chain plates are attached. These blocks were inadaquately fiberglassed to the inside of the hull. There was no way to access these screw heads to tighten the nuts should they begin to rotate in the polyester, which some had done. We ended up by boring holes in the outer hull to facilitate removal. Since we removed the inside blocks and fiberglass we finally got to see how the whole thing was assembled.
We never understood it until then; it was really stupid of us. We felt really lucky to have survived 25 years and scads of ocean forces.

"Dismantling the aft cabin": Sometime before 2002 we cut a hole in the bulkhead to the lazarette that is inside the port aft cabinet at the aft end of the aft berth to give more access to the "lazarette". It has been very useful.

We always had a tiny teak door in this bulkhead under these aft cabin cabinets at the foot of the bed. It was not large enough to give access.

Another access hint: In our early cruising we used this a lot. Use a small kid or a gidget of some sort to access these areas. In one case were welded a special tool and taught the kid to use it. Works Great and the kid feels special, which they are.

Your problem is worse than ours since you want to save the parts and replace them. We were removing all the old system. We mechanically removed what we could, but, as I recall, we used a grinder and impact drill to get the final bits out. Sorry, I don't have an answer.

However, I do recall thinking while removing the stern chain plate block that it may have been possible to cut an access hole at the sides or bottom of the block/fiberglass to get to the bolt heads (hex head bolts and washers). Our blocks were approx 3"x3" teak blocks bedded in meshmash and attached to the hull with fiberglass. At the 'V' of the stern, aft of the block there was a tiny space in which the bolt heads waited, similar to what you describe. Good luck.

Cheers, Terry
 
Jun 17, 2009
6
Fantasia 35 Cruising, Panama
Chain plate size

Great idea, I can just cut the whole thing out and mount that chain
plate on the outside. like you said cutting it out is easier than engineering
a way to neatly get the bolts off.

Thanks !
Wow, Jules, that was fast.

As long as you are removing chain plates you might want to look at the size of any that you are moving.
According to Skene's Elements of Yacht Design the original chain plates on Inshallah were too small.

I used Skene's and the advice of my British shipwright and increased the size to something like ????
Length 12-18 inches.
Thickness: 1/4 inch
Width: 2 inch
And Bolts: 5/8" - 3/8"

Leonardo, my welder in Tortola, BVI, polished both the chain plates and the bolt heads and they look great.

Good luck Terry
 
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