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Did OxyClean Ruin My Hatch Lenses?

May 27, 2004
1,619
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
After the post about Simple Green causing such havoc, I got to thinking about my three year old hatch lenses and how they crazed in so short a time.
I've have been using OxyClean powder in solution as a cleaner for the topsides for years and since it's going to be painted next year, I figured it couldn't hurt. Then, last spring, I noticed the overhead hatch lenses had crazed. I thought perhaps the sun shield material I use to reduce interior heat had caused the problem. But as I read Hayden Watson's post, I thought again. Maybe the problem is the cleaning solution.
Any of you chemical engineer types have a thought?
I've been recommending the powder for years and now I think I screwed up!:confused:
 
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Jun 9, 2004
615
Catalina 385 Marquette. Mi
Soap and water only ....for plexi/acrylic/lexan ports, hatches. The warnings are plastered all over our boat. :(

Yours may polish out, though...
 

jviss

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Feb 5, 2004
4,593
Tartan 3800 Westport, MA
By the way, it could well have been the sunlight. If plexiglass is not stress-relieved after working, like cutting or other forming, it will craze.
 

MitchM

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Jan 20, 2005
909
Nauticat 321 pilothouse 32 Erie PA
although the formula for oxy clean is proprietary, it is a bleaching agent and per required warnings 'can cause severe skin and eye irritation.' i'd suspect it has something very strong like sodium hypochlorite in it which disassociates in water to form an acid .. not good. the spouse once washed a favorite shirt in it and it ended up with white bleach spots. not good.
 
Mar 26, 2011
2,778
Corsair F-24 MK I Deale, MD
After the post about Simple Green causing such havoc, I got to thinking about my three year old hatch lenses and how they crazed in so short a time.
I've have been using OxyClean powder in solution as a cleaner for the topsides for years and since it's going to be painted next year, I figured it couldn't hurt. Then, last spring, I noticed the overhead hatch lenses had crazed. I thought perhaps the sun shield material I use to reduce interior heat had caused the problem. But as I read Hayden Watson's post, I thought again. Maybe the problem is the cleaning solution.
Any of you chemical engineer types have a thought?
I've been recommending the powder for years and now I think I screwed up!:confused:
No, there is no chemical basis for this assertion. You should change the title of the thread before you confuse people. Bleach wouldn't cause this either. They are just old. However, many alkaline cleaners can damage aluminum and even glass if allowed to dry; when dry, they become very strong.

Simple Green, on the other hand, contains several organic components that can and do interact with plastics. You are comparing apples with hand grenades--both are marketed as cleaners, but that is where the similarities end. This is why we take high school chemistry; to know the difference.

There is nothing proprietary about the active ingredient in Oxyclean powder. Like all oxygen bleaches, it is sodium percarbonate, which releases hydrogen peroxide when mixed with water.

I don't agree that Oxyclean is a great choice for regular use on the whole boat. I'd worry more about the bedding. Maybe twice a year, to whiten, through a good cleaning is better.
 
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May 27, 2004
1,619
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
Thought about the title, but can't change it once typed, I guess.
Not sure how cleaning the outside of the boat affects the sheets? :rolleyes:
 
  • Like
Likes: jviss
Feb 14, 2014
5,220
Hunter 430 Waveland, MS
Thought about the title, but can't change it once typed, I guess.
Yes you can change the Title. Look at "Thread Tools" pop down menu.;)
__________
There is nothing proprietary about the active ingredient in Oxyclean powder
:plus::plus:

This was the only commercial laundry bleach available to my Grandmother >1920's. It almost disappeared in favor of Liquid Clorox.

I wish I had been smart enough to repackage it and it sell again with infomercials.:doh:
_______
@thinwater nailed it in his post# 8.

Jim...
 
Jan 20, 2017
78
Yamaha 33 Vancouver
Soap and water only. Your hatch can be polished back to its original lustre quite easily with a series of automotive rubbing compounds. I’d steer clear of any harsh cleaners from now on; if Oxiclean ruined your lenses, it’s not doing your gelcoat any favours either. Live and learn is the name of the game, mate.
 

SG

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Feb 11, 2017
1,670
J/Boat J/160 Annapolis
GGrizzard:

Did you try a plexiglass polish or are is the plastic "cracked or crincled"? If it is just "hazy", then maybe.

MDR plastic restorer with a clean set of cotton rags is worth a try, in my opinion.
 
Mar 26, 2011
2,778
Corsair F-24 MK I Deale, MD
... if Oxiclean ruined your lenses, it’s not doing your gelcoat any favours either. Live and learn is the name of the game, mate.
This is pure supposition without any support in experience or chemistry. For example, many harsh chemicals are stored in plastics or many types. Fibergass tanks are common for concentrated bleach. Both polycarbonate and acrylic are rate "excellent" for 30% hydrogen peroxide (he was probably at 0.2%) for long term storage. Furthermore, the OP has been using Oxiclean on the boat for years, and suddenly it ruined hatches in 3 years. The total contact time is probably less that the 3-6 hour soak that is common for both sails and clothing for a single stain.

He read about other cleaners containing alcohols, which are known to present this problem, and correlated that to Oxiclean.

I think we should be looking for the real cause (bad plastic?) rather than pointing at some thing convenient, that is probably just a red herring.

Unless someone wants to run a controlled test, I think we are way off course. If the OP had soaked a sample in Oxiclean and posted a picture, that would have been more interesting.

Not sayin' cleaning the boat with Oxiclean is smart. Clean is not worth the risk of harsh chemicals.
 

SG

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Feb 11, 2017
1,670
J/Boat J/160 Annapolis
Assuming that plexiglass or lexan will be unaffected with something that appears not to damage a gelcoated fiberglass is perilous. I'd not clean transparent plastics (including vinyl- or vinyl like "windows" in dodgers) with anything but specialized products or soft, clean cotton clothes and SOFT brushes with gentler soap and water. I've use AMMONIA FREE Windex (essentially a miler solution of white vinegar and water) occasionally with clean, soft cotton rags. Never use Ammonia.

One guy told me once: If you wouldn't put it on your private parts, don't wipe it on the Plexiglas ports or hatches. :^))). Lexan is more sensitive, in my opinion. It's generally easier to scratch and much more resistant to remediating the damage.
 
Nov 9, 2008
1,338
Pearson-O'Day 290 Portland Maine
Not sure about OxyClean but I designed plastic glazed skylights and curtain walls for 14 years (among other products). The most likely culprit is window cleaner or other household cleaners. Ammonia and other chemicals will cause plasticizer migration, causing crazing and clouding. Only mild dish soap, like Dawn, should be used. I don't know if I agree with stress relieving it. I've never seen that done. We used to have to hang and dry polycarbonate in an oven overnight to get all the moisture out otherwise it will bubble when heat-formed
 
May 27, 2004
1,619
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
Thanks James, I did.
No, SG, it's crazed. And no, I don't use ammonia.