• Mobile App For Android Now Online!

    Download it here. The app is searchable in the Google Play Store under Sailboat Owners.

    Sorry iPhone/iPad users, we are still waiting on Apple. :(

    Click the X in the upper right corner to make this go away

Cracks, an observation..

Sep 5, 2018
179
Hunter 170 Northfield, NJ
We have a bit of sun today here in NJ. If I had the boat near the water and knew what I was doing I would think about taking it out, but that is another thing.

Just inspecting the cover and the boxes I put in to keep water from accumulating I noticed the port side upper rear area was quite warm while the starboard was cool. I also noticed the white area that is exposed where the rigging attaches was cool.

So now I am wondering. Was the boat previously stored outside with the port rear area exposed like it is now. That would explain the more cracks on that area.

To prevent further issues I figured some insulation might help. I took some bubble wrap and put it between the cover and the surface of the boat.

Now if only the people who own the house next door would only take down the dead oak tree next to my building. Then the boat would be in the shade all winter.
 

Attachments

Apr 16, 2017
744
Federation NCC-1701 Riverside
I think you are on to something. The hardware on the boat has silicone gaskets under them. I think they are heat sinks. I have silicone pot holders and they work very well in the kitchen. If there is such a thing as white silicone on a roll, put some down on the parts of the cover that touch the luran. Nothing should touch luran if it conducts heat.

I learned with royal blue hydroturf, that the heat collector will send it right to the luran, then warp/crack it.

Its been several weeks since i finished up the glass work and the "Take II" looks great with the hydroturf reglued with contact cement
 
Jun 8, 2004
7,721
-na -NA Anywhere USA
Shorefun. Who made the cover? White and grey colors the best. I used a company who installed vents and allowing the cover to be raised to deflect water. I also found it helped to defeat heat inside by raising the cover up with vents dispelling the heat thru vents. Worked in the Carolinas well and is hotter.

Did you ask your neighbor about the dead tree coming down?
 
Sep 5, 2018
179
Hunter 170 Northfield, NJ
Masthead Sailing Gear made the cover. It is a cover set up to be put on a rigged 170 so it has the holes and zippers to go around stuff. It is really well made. It even has the first owners name on it (I am the third owner).

There are lines in the middle to be attached to the boom to keep the cover up. I dont have a it rigged so I have to make due.
 
Sep 22, 2018
854
Hunter 216 Kingston
Masthead Sailing Gear made the cover. It is a cover set up to be put on a rigged 170 so it has the holes and zippers to go around stuff. It is really well made. It even has the first owners name on it (I am the third owner).

There are lines in the middle to be attached to the boom to keep the cover up. I dont have a it rigged so I have to make due.
Just a thought but could you use a short piece of wood or light pipe as a “mast” for storage mode? It would lift the cover and let rain or snow slide off.
 
Sep 5, 2018
179
Hunter 170 Northfield, NJ
The lines are for tying to a boom.

The solution is simple. I have put in a few plastic milk crates. I need to put an a couple more a bit forward and all will be fine.

I guess I should add that the reason for the crates is to keep water from laying in the cover. I expect that it will winter just fine otherwise.
 
Sep 24, 2018
658
O'Day 25 Chicago
The lines are for tying to a boom.

The solution is simple. I have put in a few plastic milk crates. I need to put an a couple more a bit forward and all will be fine.

I guess I should add that the reason for the crates is to keep water from laying in the cover. I expect that it will winter just fine otherwise.
I'll back you up on this one. I've done the same and can say that it works well. Works even better if there's some weight inside the crate
 
Sep 22, 2018
854
Hunter 216 Kingston
I’ve used an inflatable tube ( the type you tow behind a power boat) for the same purpose.
 
Apr 16, 2017
744
Federation NCC-1701 Riverside
I’ve used an inflatable tube ( the type you tow behind a power boat) for the same purpose.
Make sure it is not a summer pool toy:yikes:. They crack in cold temperatures. When we lived in an apartment in North Kansas City we got a good snow and decided to take our youngest sledding for the first time. We grabbed his inflatable pool and gave it a few runs down the hill. It worked great about twice before cracking in the 20 degree temperatures. On the remaining passes we were sliding on a plastic matt, watching bits tear off.

Good times
 
Sep 22, 2018
854
Hunter 216 Kingston
Make sure it is not a summer pool toy:yikes:. They crack in cold temperatures. When we lived in an apartment in North Kansas City we got a good snow and decided to take our youngest sledding for the first time. We grabbed his inflatable pool and gave it a few runs down the hill. It worked great about twice before cracking in the 20 degree temperatures. On the remaining passes we were sliding on a plastic matt, watching bits tear off.

Good times
I get your point about the cold making flexy things brittle. Not that I have any first hand experience ;) but there have been occasions where skiers who have lubricated themselves in apres ski have taken cafeteria trays out on the slopes and used them as sleds to the amusement of the crowd inside. More than a few trays didn’t make it out alive!!
 
Sep 5, 2018
179
Hunter 170 Northfield, NJ
did a change to handle low spots.

Put a large plastic box forward, a short picnic bench in the rear and a short old wood ladder between them. Now it has a downward slope that is taught. So we will see how this works as the rain and maybe snow is moving in on my area.