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Clogged sanitation line

Dec 19, 2019
20
Hunter 45 Deck Salon Cumming, Ga
I had a clogged line yesterday that I was able to unclog with a sewer snake to get the head to flush. Lots of petrified waste rocks came back out. About 3 cups worth on a 10ft line. Amazing anything was getting through. I want to add a chemical to dissolve the other 95 percent of it that is still in the line. Does such a chemical exist. Peggy?
 
Dec 19, 2019
20
Hunter 45 Deck Salon Cumming, Ga
Anyone know how to get to these 98 results. Thread doesn't open and main description goes no where
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Jan 4, 2006
3,820
Hunter 310 West Vancouver, B.C.
Anyone know how to get to these 98 results.
WHY ? ? ? ? What could you possibly be looking for ? ? ?

You've already been given the only possible solution to your problem, several times over. Your hose is old, it's heavily scaled. Even if you do manage to get the scale out, the hose has already been permeated. You're not going to find an epiphany in the broken link.
 
Jan 11, 2014
7,727
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
All of my options. Do you know how to get to these 98 results
If you don't want an old leaking smelly hose, then there is one and only one viable option, replace the hose.

On the other hand, if you want to spend time, money, and effort on ineffective methods of reviving old decaying hoses, by all means pursue it.

Ineffective methods include:

Removing the offending hose and beating it against the sidewalk. This may break up and dislodge the calcium deposits while weakening and abrading the hose wall. It will not remove the smell.

Soak the hose in vinegar. Change vinegar often. This might be effective, however you will be long gone before heavy deposits are removed. The hose will smell of vinegar and sewage forever.

Soak the hose in hydrochloric or phosphoric acid, this will remove calcium deposits while degrading the hose material. It will still smell.

If you notice all 4 of these methods the removal and reinstallation of the hose. The most difficult part of the job. Removing the hose from its fittings without damaging the hose will in and of itself be challenging. It makes no sense to me to do the same job twice, once for the method that won't work, once for the only viable solution, new hoses.

But, hey, it's your time, money, effort, bloody knuckles, and boat.
 
Dec 19, 2019
20
Hunter 45 Deck Salon Cumming, Ga
Thanks Dave. I appreciate your input.
Peggy,
Do you have any other suggestions. The hose is about 5 years old is doesn't smell at the moment.
 
Jan 4, 2006
3,820
Hunter 310 West Vancouver, B.C.
All of my options.
Damn, you're honest to a fault :thumbup:. Here's the original post from @Terry Cox back in 2018.


You won't get any better suggestions from that posting than you're already seen above in today's postings. If you do go the cheap route and it falls flat ........... remember, I told you so ! ! ! !
 
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Dec 19, 2019
20
Hunter 45 Deck Salon Cumming, Ga
Thanks Ralph. I'm looking for the expert opinion from Peggy. I know her answer will likely be the same as yours. I want to make sure I've exhausted all my other options. The hose isn't cheap and I want to get as much out of it as possible. And yes, I'm honest to a fault. I'm a Texan, can't help it man.
 
Dec 2, 1997
8,086
- - LIttle Rock
I had a clogged line yesterday that I was able to unclog with a sewer snake to get the head to flush. Lots of petrified waste rocks came back out. About 3 cups worth on a 10ft line. Amazing anything was getting through. I want to add a chemical to dissolve the other 95 percent of it that is still in the line. Does such a chemical exist. Peggy?
A 15% dilution of muriatic (hydrochloric) acid--available from any hardware store--should work, although it may take several applications. It should be allowed to stand for 45 minutes.

However, it sounds like you removed the hose to run the snake through it...if so, forget dissolving the "rocks"...replace the hose. Raritan Sani-Flex is the best...it's proven to be 100% odor permeation resistant...in fact, Raritan increased the warranty against it to 10 years. Plus it's so flexible that it can be bent almost as tight as a hairpin without kinking, making re-hosing jobs a LOT easier. Defender has it for < $10/ft.

You said your hoses are about 5 years old...that's the end of the warranty period for all the other "premium" hoses...cheap ones only have a 1 year warranty. What are they (brand, "model")?

Whichever route you choose--chemical or new hose--you can prevent future mineral buildup by flushing a cupful--2 at most--of distilled white vinegar all the way through to the tank once a week. Let it stay in the hose for 45 minutes--no longer than an hour, then follow the vinegar with at least a quart of clean FRESH water to rinse out the hose (the vinegar won't upset the holding tank). NEVER leave vinegar sitting in the bowl. When soft rubber--the toilet joker valve--is allowed to sit and soak in vinegar it swells and distorts.

--Peggie
 
Dec 19, 2019
20
Hunter 45 Deck Salon Cumming, Ga
Thanks Peggy. I didn't remove the hose to run the snake. Ran it on the installed hose. I currently have shields vac xhd series 148 hoses. Looks like I need to replace all my hoses with Sani-Flex. Two heads, one vent, one deck pump out and one macerator hose. What about the PVC connections from the hoses to the holding tank and other connections, do those end up permeating odor over time? My boat is a 2008
 
Dec 2, 1997
8,086
- - LIttle Rock
Hard PVC does not permeate with odor.

Btw, replacing hoses does NOT have to be a nasty stinky job. These directions should have been included in my book, but were somehow omitted (I plan to do some minor updating and revisions soon that will include adding them):

Before you begin, flush a LOT of clean fresh water through the entire system including the tank.
Start with the highest connections, duct tape the ends as you remove each one.
Warming the old hoses a bit (I always used a blow dryer, but you can use a heat gun if you're experienced with using one and are careful not to melt the hose) will make them much easier to get off the fittings.
Put a plastic waste basket liner under each connection to catch any spills.
Warming the hose also makes it easier to get the new hose onto the fittings. Lubricate the inside of the hose and the outside of the fitting with a little K-Y...it's a water soluble surgical jelly that dries out and is also much slipperier than dishwashing liquid.

And I'm sure you already know that all hose connections should be double clamped, with screws 180 degrees apart...or at least 90 degrees if access makes 180 impossible.

--Peggie