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Attaching reefing lines to boom

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MickP

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Nov 20, 2012
65
Hunter 33 Charleston
The instructions that came with the boom suggested fixing some hardware to the boom to which to attach the end of the reefing lines after they had passed through the leech cringles. I recently contacted the supplier of the boom to see what they suggested, and they said that normally the reef lines are simply tied around the boom. I like the idea of keeping it simple, but are there any downsides to doing this?

Thanks
 
Nov 8, 2010
11,385
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
Nope. For loose footed mains that's the new normal.

Just make the knot tight to the boom so the cringle can be pulled a low as possible.
 

Paul F

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Jun 3, 2004
827
Hunter 1980 - 33 Bradenton
If your 33 is like mine there are sheaves at the end of the boom and internal lines that can haul the main back and down by stringing the line through the cringle and tying it off to an eye at the side end of the boom. All of this is good but I prefer tie a reefing line around the boom as described. The boom on the 33 is short and easy to reach. The other method using boom lines allows you to reef from the mast or to by use of blocks direct the line back to the cockpit. But for me this seems to be more hassle than it is worth. The key is to reef when you think you should rather than wait until you have to.
 

Tom J

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Sep 30, 2008
2,008
Catalina 310 Quincy, MA
The bitter end of my jiffy reefing line is tied to the boom with a bowline. Simple and secure.
 
Mar 20, 2012
3,983
Cal 34-III, MacGregor 25 Salem, Oregon
or you can attach a heavy eye strap/pad eye near the end of the boom to attach the reefing line to.... its all a matter of choice.
my reefing line comes back along side the boom thru eye straps, then thru a turning block, then up and thru the cringle and then down to an eye strap and it tied off.....
 

TLW

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Jan 15, 2013
271
Oday 31 Whitehall, MI
Mick, If your boom has reefing sheaves at the aft end, or if you choose to place a block there to serve the same purpose, it is important that a pad eye, or eye-strap, that is used to dead end the reefing line be placed directly below the reefing cringle on the boom. This gives you an EFFECTIVE angle of pull half way between "down" and "back." Pulling the sail down to the boom only by pulling back places way too much tension on the cringe and could result in it eventually pulling out (tearing). Of course, a 2nd reef requires an eye-strap forward of the 1st one to accomplish the same thing. This method just takes care of the leech, of course. If reefing lines for the luff are led to the cockpit, then the whole operation can be handled from there - an arrangement I like better than doing it all at the mast as with most jiffy-reefing or single line reefing set-ups.

Using the lines for the luff eliminates the need to use a reefing hook at the gooseneck, although you might prefer to. Lots of ways to accomplish these things. You just need to decide what is comfortable for YOU.
 

MickP

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Nov 20, 2012
65
Hunter 33 Charleston
Thanks for all your inputs.
TLW: the diagram i have shows an eye-strap 4" aft of the position on the boom that the cringle is directly above. I guess if i tie the line to the boom (i was thinking a round turn and 2 half hitches), i can play about with placement so if i do attach a pad eye later, i will know where to put it
Cheers
 
Jan 24, 2008
293
Alerion Express 28 Oneida Lake, NY
Mick...

On our boat with single-line reefing
1. the line exits the aft end of the boom
2. goes up through the reef cringle
3. back down and under the boom
4. then up to the line itself, tied off with a bowline in these pictures.

Since then, I’ve ended it with a plastic thimble in place of the bowline, which seems to cut down on the friction. Unfortunately, I haven’t replaced the photo.:redface:

Paul
 

Attachments

Nov 6, 2006
9,226
Hunter 34 Mandeville Louisiana
Woah.. That is an interesting idea, Paul.. I am going to play with that idea.. Thanks for posting.
 

DougM

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Jul 24, 2005
2,184
Beneteau 323 Manistee, MI
My mainsail has blocks sewn into each reef point. there is a padeye at the aft end of the boom at each of the two leech reef points. In each reef, the line is tied to the
the padeye with a bowline. the line is led up through the aft block on the mainsail leech, then down through a sheave in the end of the boom. the line then goes through the boom, exits upward and then through the block on the sail at the luff reef point. From there, the line goes down to a block at the base of the mast and is led back through a spinlock clutch on the cabin top. I can do a reef or shake one out without leaving the cockpit. Works like a charm.
 
Mar 1, 2012
2,182
1961 Rhodes Meridian 25 Texas coast
Here's a link to a very good article from Pineapple Sails on reefing. Note- they DO NOT like single line reefing as it puts a whole lot of excess strain on the sail. I don't care for it either because it causes much more friction. Even on my small boat, I reef at the mast

http://www.pineapplesails.com/articles/reefing.htm
 

Joe

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Jun 1, 2004
7,456
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
Mick...

On our boat with single-line reefing
1. the line exits the aft end of the boom
2. goes up through the reef cringle
3. back down and under the boom
4. then up to the line itself, tied off with a bowline in these pictures.

Since then, I’ve ended it with a plastic thimble in place of the bowline, which seems to cut down on the friction. Unfortunately, I haven’t replaced the photo.:redface:

Paul
I'd move that cheek block on the boom forward 6 inches or so.. then anchor the loop end of the line to that, rather than back on itself, to get the desired 45 degrees down/back... problem solved.
 
May 20, 2011
34
Beneteau Clipper 323 St Peter Port
My mainsail has blocks sewn into each reef point. there is a padeye at the aft end of the boom at each of the two leech reef points. In each reef, the line is tied to the
the padeye with a bowline. the line is led up through the aft block on the mainsail leech, then down through a sheave in the end of the boom. the line then goes through the boom, exits upward and then through the block on the sail at the luff reef point. From there, the line goes down to a block at the base of the mast and is led back through a spinlock clutch on the cabin top. I can do a reef or shake one out without leaving the cockpit. Works like a charm.
Doug, this is a bit off thread, but I have a 323 and the line for the 1st reef does not run freely. Have you ever had any problems with this?
 

DougM

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Jul 24, 2005
2,184
Beneteau 323 Manistee, MI
DJBrookster, I have had some concerns with that, but more so on the second reef. I got rid of a lot of the drag by making sure the sail slugs were well lubed with MacLube or similar dry lubricant. When the reef lines were led upward through the eyelets cast into the boom gooseneck, that seemed to be a source of a lot of friction. The reef lines are really heavier than they need to be at 3/8, and they swell a bit with age. If I had money to burn, I would probably buy some smaller diameter line.

Make sure you have the lines correctly rigged. Starting at the aft end from the tie off through the forward side of the block on the leech, back and down through the sheave on the boom, through the boom to the forward sheave and up to the back side of the block on the luff, then down to the block at the mast base. By the way,make abosolutely sure that your reef lines aren't twisted around each other or the outhaul inside the boom.

Doug
 

MickP

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Nov 20, 2012
65
Hunter 33 Charleston
Paul, thanks for the photos. Like the set up
DougM, sounds like a sensible way of doing it. Any downside to having blocks sewed into your mainsail?
TSBB2, good article. I have reef hooks at the goose neck. Assuming i lower the sail and hook on the reef tack first, surely i don't need to worry as much about the aftward force on the leech cringle pulling at the luff sliders? I would have thought it would be more important to ensure a flat sail and therefore place the boom attachment point aft of the leech cringle
 

DougM

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Jul 24, 2005
2,184
Beneteau 323 Manistee, MI
No major downside to having the blocks on the sail. The attachment points are heavily reinforced ( the sail was built that way originally), and since the sail is loose footed, it is fairly easy to flatten it .The lazy jacks help to contain the reefs. thus for anything other than really long trips, there is little need to tie the sail down through the grommets. I often start out with at least one reef, and let it out if I decide I don't need it. My boat is fairly tender and to keep it sailing flat we tend to reef earlier rather than later. My wife still doesn't react favorably when the boat heels significantly.
 
May 20, 2011
34
Beneteau Clipper 323 St Peter Port
DJBrookster, I have had some concerns with that, but more so on the second reef. I got rid of a lot of the drag by making sure the sail slugs were well lubed with MacLube or similar dry lubricant. When the reef lines were led upward through the eyelets cast into the boom gooseneck, that seemed to be a source of a lot of friction. The reef lines are really heavier than they need to be at 3/8, and they swell a bit with age. If I had money to burn, I would probably buy some smaller diameter line.

Make sure you have the lines correctly rigged. Starting at the aft end from the tie off through the forward side of the block on the leech, back and down through the sheave on the boom, through the boom to the forward sheave and up to the back side of the block on the luff, then down to the block at the mast base. By the way,make abosolutely sure that your reef lines aren't twisted around each other or the outhaul inside the boom.

Doug
Thanks Doug I'll check all that our.
 
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