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Another sail question this time my mainsail

kito

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Sep 13, 2012
2,011
1979 Hunter Cherubini 30 Clemmons
Having a C22 and not seeing this before, can someone help me out and tell me what's going on in the photo? Is this some kind of Cunningham on my H30 mainsail? Is this a typical setup for modern mainsails?
 

Attachments

Sep 15, 2009
6,242
S2 9.2a Fairhope Al
not sure but i think its a down haul

but then again after thinking about it a little more looks like a crappy way to mount the slides
 

kito

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Sep 13, 2012
2,011
1979 Hunter Cherubini 30 Clemmons
It's only like this for the first 2 slugs....maybe 5 foot up. All the other slugs are mounted to the cringles with no line. It seems to be designed this way since there are 2 cringles by each other for those 2 slugs. That why I thought it was some kind of antiquated form of a Cunningham adjustment.
 
Jun 6, 2006
6,991
currently boatless wishing Harrington Harbor North, MD
Your main has a tack angle of less than 90 degrees so you need this form of attachment. Think they call it a jackline. If you play around with a triangular piece of paper holding one edge at the same distance from the opposite corner you will see that you need to let the luft have some room in the portion that is below the perpendicular to the mast at clew height when you raise and lower the sail if the tack corner has an angle of less than 90 degrees.
Otherwise you have to release the clew outhaul when raising or lowering.
 

RichH

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Feb 14, 2005
4,773
Tayana 37 cutter; I20/M20 SCOWS Worton Creek, MD
It a reefing jack line. The purpose is to allow the slugs at the bottom of the luff to 'stack up' one on top of one another when reefing to the first reef position. When you drop the main part way the jack line loosens. Without a jack line the sails luff will become an accordion folded shape which will interfere in getting the first reef cringle close to the reefing hooks, etc. at the gooseneck; and to get that needed clearance you'd need to remove a few of the slugs from the mast track in order to tie in the first reef.
 

kito

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Sep 13, 2012
2,011
1979 Hunter Cherubini 30 Clemmons
Thanks Bill....great info. Is this what the red triangle near the tack on the starboard side of my sail is for?
 

kito

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Sep 13, 2012
2,011
1979 Hunter Cherubini 30 Clemmons
It a reefing jack line. The purpose is to allow the slugs at the bottom of the luff to 'stack up' one on top of one another when reefing to the first reef position. When you drop the main part way the jack line loosens. Without a jack line the sails luff will become an accordion folded shape which will interfere in getting the first reef cringle close to the reefing hooks, etc. at the gooseneck; and to get that needed clearance you'd need to remove a few of the slugs from the mast track in order to tie in the first reef.
Well that makes sense too. I actually first thought since the slugs where attached the a line that it was a way to remove them from the groove when reefing.
 

kito

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Sep 13, 2012
2,011
1979 Hunter Cherubini 30 Clemmons
Can someone tell me what the red triangle near the tack of my mainsail is for then? My genoa has a yellow arrow on it's tack too. Just curious
 

Joe

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Jun 1, 2004
7,413
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
Thanks Bill....great info. Is this what the red triangle near the tack on the starboard side of my sail is for?
Uh.. you mean Thanks RichH. It allows the reef cringle to get close to the reef horn.

Modern sails will have a floppy ring strap, sometimes called a "dog bone" ring strap, installed through the cringle to make it easier to hook over the horn.



Here's a comment I lifted from another forum:
That arrangement of slugs and 'jackline' is to allow the reef cringle to reach the tack hook despite the slugs being stacked up in the slot. If the slugs were directly attached then there wouldn't be enough slack to pull the reef tack point down to the boom.

With adequate halyard tension the jackline pulls tight, essential pulling the slugs and sail and track together.

If the halyard is truly at full hoist the the length of the jackline needs to be shortened, so that there's no slack in it when the sail is fully hoisted. Like this:

 
May 27, 2004
1,695
Hunter 30_74-83 Ponce Inlet FL
If you mean the red triangle symbol, it's the "Hard Sail" logo. Original equipment on our boats Kito. The yellow arrow...Anyone?
 

kito

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Sep 13, 2012
2,011
1979 Hunter Cherubini 30 Clemmons
If you mean the red triangle symbol, it's the "Hard Sail" logo. Original equipment on our boats Kito. The yellow arrow...Anyone?
Thanks ggrizzard, that's good to know. At least I know now that it is most likely the original from 1979. I sure would like to know the history of this boat. Both sails are in great shape...no patches or loose stitching and the fabric is still rather stiff.
 
Sep 7, 2021
3
catalina 22 capri huntington ny
Having a C22 and not seeing this before, can someone help me out and tell me what's going on in the photo? Is this some kind of Cunningham on my H30 mainsail? Is this a typical setup for modern mainsails?
Can you send more pictures of the reefing jack line setup. I need to do the same thing on my boat.