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Another adjustment question, re: split backstay.

DougM

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Jul 24, 2005
1,776
Beneteau 323 Manistee, MI
I didn't want to hijack the thread about the 311 backstay adjustment , but would like to determine a means of adjusting a 323 split backstay without using a triangle plate and block system to pinch the two stays together.
I was considering a change to a single backstay from the masthead to about half the distance to the transom terminated to a single block. I would then utilize the existing backstay anchorages to create a 16:1 system operable from one side.
I have two reasons for considering this. I don't want to have a block and tackle adjuster running to mid transom mostly because of a headroom issue at the helm. Second, while stepping and Unstepping the mast each spring and fall, the split backstays are a pain to attach, detach, and adjust.
 
Nov 26, 2012
1,167
Hunter 34 Berkeley
Your plan would work. Also, you can still use a triangle plate block to pinch the two backstays together but you do not have to come down to the middle. You can run a line from one side up through a block under the triangle block and down to the other side with adjustment on one or both sides. This would also allow you to completely dismantle the adjuster without disconnecting the backstay.
 
Nov 8, 2010
10,812
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
It's a sound plan.

If you do this, I'd suggest using dyneema as part of any purchase (2:1) multiplier. Use Maffioli swiftcord through the 6:1 block. Its perfect line for this application.

Also,
Use a heavy dyneema strop to connect a hard point to the highest block that cordage runs though. This strop is sized to take the load at MAX open and will help save the rig if the 6:1 line breaks or comes loose, a block breaks, or if any dyneema cut. Like this First 36.7 application 48:1 (6:2:2:2:1)

 
Aug 20, 2013
115
Beneteau 311 Port Clinton, OH (Lake Erie)
Use a heavy dyneema strop to connect a hard point to the highest block that cordage runs though. This strop is sized to take the load at MAX open and will help save the rig if the 6:1 line breaks or comes loose, a block breaks, or if any dyneema cut. Like this First 36.7 application 48:1 (6:2:2:2:1)
Jackdaw,

Is the strop the white line with red flecks that runs from the bottom of the highest block? If yes, then this strop does not appear to protect your rig if the top block breaks, just the rest of the arrangement.

As an off-thread question, are there any internal blocks in the boom for your main outhaul? Your boom is very similar to mine, and it is very difficult to get any good tension on the foot of the sail even when sail is slack. I don't know if something is hung up inside or if the line is supposed to pass straight through to the gooseneck.
 
Nov 8, 2010
10,812
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
Jackdaw,

Is the strop the white line with red flecks that runs from the bottom of the highest block? If yes, then this strop does not appear to protect your rig if the top block breaks, just the rest of the arrangement.

As an off-thread question, are there any internal blocks in the boom for your main outhaul? Your boom is very similar to mine, and it is very difficult to get any good tension on the foot of the sail even when sail is slack. I don't know if something is hung up inside or if the line is supposed to pass straight through to the gooseneck.
Yes that's the strop. And yes it only protects the system below that upper block, but everything above that is metal and unlikely to break, get cut, or open accidentally. That's common best practice.

The 36.7 can have either a 2:1, 5:1, or 10:1 outhaul purchase. From the factory it is 2:1 with the out haul simply loops through the clew and back to the boom end. Its only adjustable with a winch when the sail is loaded. With the in-boom 5:1 or 10:1 systems its often a hand load. Without a load, we can pull the foot very tight even by hand.
 
Aug 5, 2012
3
Catalina 320 Lansing, NY
Using a triangle plate with three blocks on the split backstay, with a cascade line running down to a 4:1 or 6:1 system would work well, but the blocks/triangle plate would be way up high. Do you think that would be a problem?
Bill