1900 containers lost at sea

DougM

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Jul 24, 2005
2,192
Beneteau 323 Manistee, MI
Apparently, floating objects don’t just show up in the ocean. There are things that occur in the great lakes that can create damage. Recently, the high water has caused shoreline erosion that has put trees, parts of beach access staircases, parts of cottages and other flotsam into the lakes.
A few years ago, a barge lost a load of pulpwood logs over the side in Lake Michigan. The bad news is you cannot see the individual floating logs. They tend to float vertically... Imagine one of those punching a hole in a hull.
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,420
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
A few years ago, a barge lost a load of pulpwood logs over the side in Lake Michigan.
Curious. How long do pulp logs hold together when the pulp and glue is exposed to water?
 
Sep 22, 2018
1,869
Hunter 216 Kingston
Apparently, floating objects don’t just show up in the ocean. There are things that occur in the great lakes that can create damage. Recently, the high water has caused shoreline erosion that has put trees, parts of beach access staircases, parts of cottages and other flotsam into the lakes.
A few years ago, a barge lost a load of pulpwood logs over the side in Lake Michigan. The bad news is you cannot see the individual floating logs. They tend to float vertically... Imagine one of those punching a hole in a hull.
In 2017 there were a number of large tree stumps floating in the Kingston waters. The stumps were left in the ground by landowners who wanted to improve their view. High water undercut the shoreline and eventually the stumps ended up floating. SCARY stuff to see from a boat! Likely even worse if your DID NOT see it:yikes:
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,420
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Up here in the Pacific NW we call them snags.

Once a common site in the late 1800's, congress was called upon to protect the navigable waters from the dangers of logging. In 1882 Congress approved $20,000 to address the problem of snags in the waterways.

3 Steam Powered Snagboats were commissioned to meet the challenge. They were the Skagit which served from 1885 to 1914, Swinomish which worked the waters til 1929, and the W.T. Preston. The W.T. Preston started work in 1929. She is one of 2 snag boats remaining in the lower 48.

She is on display in Anacortes WA.

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W.T._Preston.jpg
 
Jan 5, 2017
2,173
Beneteau First 38 Lyall Harbour Saturna Island
She is on display in Anacortes WA
And as we know she didn’t get them all and is unlikely to get many more from that position. There is a debris trap on the lower Fraser but you only have to look at any beach to see how well that works.