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No frills fiberglass to paint

Discussion in 'Ask All Sailors' started by tipsyravensailing, Apr 16, 2018. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. tipsyravensailing

    tipsyravensailing

    Joined Apr 25, 2017
    147 posts, 23 likes
    pearson 26
    US holland mi
    Hey guys

    My mast project and hardware projects are coming along fantastically and i'm gearing up to start a month of body work and such on the boat. But i need to go from primer to color. I really genuinely absolutely 100% do not care or want to care about gelcoat. I'd really rather grind it to glass to eliminate the gel if it is a problem. Its too much hassle, too little chance of success... for way too much compared to the purchase or selling power of the boat.

    Ok. So. I'm painting every inch, outside, on this pearson. I think interlux might be the way to go based on what i'm reading. But i need to achieve topside color and hull color and bottom color. The lady has insisted on a bit of purple on the boat, and i'm likely going to satisfy her with some vinyl applications. That could solve my name if i have it cut (i have access to a vinyl plotter) and strips of material for the waterline and just below the rub rail. So I just need White. Simple, yes?

    I am GUESSING i need a primer, that the primer is usable anywhere on the boat, a hull color, a topside and a bottom paint thats protective against growth (freshwater lake). With that said, please, i'm begging here, help me with some of the anxiety and point me in the right direction of what to buy?
     


  2. dlochner

    dlochner

    Joined Jan 11, 2014
    2,104 posts, 743 likes
    Sabre 362
    113 US Fair Haven, NY
    That would be the cove stripe if it is close to the rub rail.

    Don't do this. If you want to paint, just prep the gelcoat and paint over it. Less work and a nicer finish at the end.

    The paint you use for the deck and hull can be the same. The paint you use for the bottom should be different. On the bottom, once all the old bottom paint is gone, use a barrier coat like Interlux 2000e. Then use an antifouling paint. In freshwater VC 17 is popular and it comes in a couple of colors.

    If you go with Interlux, go to their website and go to the "Professional" side of the site. They will have pretty clear directions on what to do. Also check out BoatworksToday.com and his YouTube channel.

    The procedure for the hull and deck is to wash it well and wipe it down with a degreaser/dewaxer solution. Then sand with 80 grit. While sanding mark all the dings with a pencil so you can find them later. Fill the dings with fairing compound. Interlux makes Watertite. It is easy to work with. Next use a primer appropriate to the paint you are using, again Interlux makes a couple, check the tech info on the Interlux site. Lightly sand the primer to get a smooth surface. Next apply several thin coats of paint.

    The deck will need some sort of nonskid. There are a lot of options. Just painting over the old nonskid will make it a non-nonskid, not what you want.

    At this point the best course of action is to go the Interlux site and read all the tech info for each of the paints that you will use, all 4 of them, barrier coat, primer, top coat, and antifouling.

    Good luck!
     


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  3. rgranger

    rgranger

    Joined Jan 19, 2010
    4,878 posts, 865 likes
    Hunter 26
    US Smith Mountain Lake
    :plus: on barrier coat.

    I have restored many badly neglected boats. And over time I developed an attitude that on every boat I restore I like to remove the anti-fouling and get a good look at the bottom of the hull. I have found cracks, and large gouges hidden under barrier coat and once I even found two screws penetrating the hull from a PO bilge pump installation (ironic ... I know). I like to use the 2-part epoxy barrier coat but there are many good products out there.
     


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  4. Don S/V ILLusion

    Don S/V ILLusion

    Joined Sep 25, 2008
    5,027 posts, 264 likes
    Alden 50
    US Sarasota, Florida
    Am I the only one who finds it troubling that anyone would remove the gelcoat and simply prime/paint raw glass?

    And that he implied ("selling power") he might subsequently sell it?
     


  5. rgranger

    rgranger

    Joined Jan 19, 2010
    4,878 posts, 865 likes
    Hunter 26
    US Smith Mountain Lake
    He said he would remove the gel coat “if needed”
    I took it as him asking for recommendations . That is what this site does best
     


  6. Don S/V ILLusion

    Don S/V ILLusion

    Joined Sep 25, 2008
    5,027 posts, 264 likes
    Alden 50
    US Sarasota, Florida
    I didn't see that. Any of the three times I re-read it.
     


  7. dlochner

    dlochner

    Joined Jan 11, 2014
    2,104 posts, 743 likes
    Sabre 362
    113 US Fair Haven, NY
    The OP has started several threads related to his restoration of this boat. I think it is safe to say that it has been a real learning experience for him. With that said, I believe in another thread that it was not his goal to have this boat forever and he planned to eventually sell it and buy a larger boat for extended cruising. I also did not go through all his other posts to verify this, so I could be incorrect.
     


  8. tipsyravensailing

    tipsyravensailing

    Joined Apr 25, 2017
    147 posts, 23 likes
    pearson 26
    US holland mi
    Gel coat conversations always have two elements. 1. Complicated and expense. 2. It'll never really match anyway.

    I'm not interested spending this year learning to gel coat a boat. I want it in the water and serviceable so I can learn. I bought the boat for only two grand. I spent more in my little fishing boat. This is not a restoration. This is the Delta 88 you buy your kids when they are first learning to drive.

    And because dloch posted while I was typing this up... This Delta 88 needs good brakes a reliable engine and functional seat belts. It doesn't need racing stripes... And I don't mind if there's rust on the wheel fenders. ... A bit of Rust-Oleum and back to learning in the land yacht lol
     


  9. Davidasailor26

    Davidasailor26

    Joined May 17, 2004
    1,177 posts, 200 likes
    Beneteau Oceanis 37 LE
    US Havre de Grace
    In any case, like the others said, don't take off the gelcoat. Read the instructions on how to prep it for paint and you'll be alright. The one thing I would add is just a matter of terminology - the area that you're calling the hull is really the topsides, and the flat area that you walk on (where you want the non-skid) is really the deck. No need to worry about matching colors between the sections. Very often the topsides will be white or off-white and the bottom will be a color matching the canvas.
     


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  10. tipsyravensailing

    tipsyravensailing

    Joined Apr 25, 2017
    147 posts, 23 likes
    pearson 26
    US holland mi
    And fwiw no . I don't intend to keep it. No more than I still own that Delta. But all the photos and restoration efforts are a matter of public knowledge for to the fact I post every detail on social media. You guys see maybe ten percent of the photos...
     


  11. dlochner

    dlochner

    Joined Jan 11, 2014
    2,104 posts, 743 likes
    Sabre 362
    113 US Fair Haven, NY
    On gel coated boats the difference can be pronounced. Sun causes gel coat to oxidize and the deck gets much more sun than the hull, so it oxidizes more.
     


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  12. tipsyravensailing

    tipsyravensailing

    Joined Apr 25, 2017
    147 posts, 23 likes
    pearson 26
    US holland mi
    David... That is part of the concern. There is a gouge or two that is deep. The intention is to use fairing to smooth it back out and then prime. There's also notable crazing on the transom and I presume I'll be doing much the same there?
     


  13. dlochner

    dlochner

    Joined Jan 11, 2014
    2,104 posts, 743 likes
    Sabre 362
    113 US Fair Haven, NY
    For any of the larger gouges or crazing it will be necessary to widen the opening by sanding. The larger the surface area the better adhesion between the fairing compound and the hull. Take a look at the BoatworksToday website and Youtube channel, Andy has a couple videos on filling and fairing cracks, dings and crazing.
     


  14. dscribner

    dscribner

    Joined Nov 9, 2008
    1,329 posts, 41 likes
    Pearson-O'Day 290
    US Portland Maine
    Tipsy,

    Treat it like a car project. Add filler or fiberglass as required. Grind/sand smooth. Fair it to the surrounding hull. Prime,sand,prime, sand,prime, sand, paint, paint. ON the bottom, if you go to the gelcoat, apply a few layers of barrier coat then a good multiseason bottom coat.

    For filler, use a marine filler. Bondo is clay-based and will swell and soften when it gets moist. I say "when" not if.

    Paint. I used Petite EasyPoxy, one part poly with good results. If it's a starter or inexpensive boat, its probably the best thing for you. Interlux, SeaHawk and West Marine have similar products. Keep an eye on Discount Marine for sales and free shipping.

    Barrier paint, you're on your own.

    Bottom paint. I've use Petit HydroCoat and SeaHawk Monterey, both with very good results. HIghly recommended.
     


  15. rgranger

    rgranger

    Joined Jan 19, 2010
    4,878 posts, 865 likes
    Hunter 26
    US Smith Mountain Lake
    You are correct! I misquoted. I'm not trying to pick a fight. The OP said

    I took it as him looking for advice and not stating an opinion of what is the correct move.
     


  16. HMT2

    HMT2

    Joined Mar 20, 2014
    550 posts, 119 likes
    Hunter 31
    US Shoreacres, TX
    I painted the deck and coach roof on my '83 Hunter 31 several years ago. Here is a copy of a post I posted a few years back.

    Tom, first Don Casey’s book This Old Boat is a great resource for any project boat. I have a copy at home and one on the boat. Also, Interlux has an ask the expert thing online, and I have actually called and spoken with some of their technical advisors and they are helpful.

    Once you have committed to DIY, to paint the decks, coach roof and topsides, the first thing you need to do is decide one part or two part. This was my first time to paint with marine paint or paint a boat so I opted for the less durable easier to use one part Brightside by Interlux. (Good reviews in Practical Sailor) I used white, where I live and in St. Pete even a light gray or beige can heat up. I mixed in Intergrip to the paint for my nonskid areas. This is a must, because just paint over the nonskid is super slick.

    I bought the majority of my supplies at Home Depot or Sherwin Williams. You need smooth foam rollers 2in and 4in trays, tape etc. . For doing the molded nonskid you will need four inch with some nap on it. (I found the 2in very helpful for tighter spots.) You will also need lots of sandpaper, I bought a new sander that uses quarter sheets of sandpaper, the kind indicated in Don Casey’s book, it was a good call. I bought all of my primer, paint, cleaners and thinners online from a place in FL and saved about three hundred dollars over West Marine and local chandlery including shipping. Lots of foam brushes and one good badger hair brush.

    Start with a really good cleaning, then remove every piece of deck hardware, hinges etc. that you can, I left the cleats. Then use Interlux de-waxing solvent 202 I used less than a quart. Wipe everything down liberally, then rinse (as directed on the can I think) I never found any gloves that would stand up to this solvent it ate through three pair of “chemical resistant gloves”. Then start sanding, you are not sanding everything off, just making it ready to take the primer. I forget but I think I went 80, 150, 220 before I primed. You do not want to get down to the fiberglass. Then fill and fair any holes or damage that you want taken care of sand those to smooth. Wash down, wipe down with Interlux 333 using two rag method. (one for wetting one for wiping). Then prime the whole topside, I rolled it on and tipped it. When dry, sand, wash wipe and paint.

    I painted the whole topside with one coat, rolled and tipped everything. Did the deck one day and the coach roof and cockpit the next. Then taped off all the nonskid areas, mixed in the intergrip (stirring frequently) using the rollers with nap on them did two coats. I did paint the tops of the raised area just in front of the cockpit with the nonskid paint and I love that, otherwise that would be slick. I roughed up with a scotchbrite pad between coats on the nonskid. Pull the tape then paint the smooth areas, roll and tip. Sanding and wiping between coats. I kept the brush near by rolled a little area and tipped. I used foam brushes for all but the final coat where I used the badger hair brush.

    One thing I did and was glad I did was take the tops off of the lazarettes in the cockpit took them home and practiced on them before starting full bore. It was very helpful and frankly encouraging to do that first. That way if it was a total disaster I could put cushions on them and be done.

    I ended up putting some Seadek pads down in the cockpit floor, I really like them. My dad had thrown down some Awlgrip paint without prepping properly and it was coming off and I could not get it out of all the recesses so I covered it. Here are some pics. Before, during and after.


    Hope this helps.
     

    Attached Files:



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  17. tipsyravensailing

    tipsyravensailing

    Joined Apr 25, 2017
    147 posts, 23 likes
    pearson 26
    US holland mi
    that is a stellar write up! I very much appreciate the insights :D
    I have the benefit of having access to professional paint sprayers and such due to the long history of automotive shenanigans in my family so i'll be using that as much as possible. I am also going to go with an all white approach so that works well. Using this post i'll list out each of the elements i'm planning on using and sanity check myself with hopefully you all's input before throwing a grand or two at the problem blindly :D
     


  18. tipsyravensailing

    tipsyravensailing

    Joined Apr 25, 2017
    147 posts, 23 likes
    pearson 26
    US holland mi
    incidentally... i just got a message back from interlux. There's more questions but here's the current lineup:


    Primer above waterline Epoxy Primekote
    Topside and hull paint Prefection
    Deck area paint Interdeck

    Primer below waterline Interprotect 2000e
    Antifouling VC17m Extra

    Now a question of quantity and "accessory". He included the datasheets for each, and i actually like reading MDS so that'll be next for me.

    I did ask for his suggestions for a nonskid additive.
     


  19. dlochner

    dlochner

    Joined Jan 11, 2014
    2,104 posts, 743 likes
    Sabre 362
    113 US Fair Haven, NY
    Be sure to read the spraying instructions for Perfection. The vapors are highly toxic. If I recall correctly, Interlux recommends the use of a full face positive pressure mask.
     


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  20. tipsyravensailing

    tipsyravensailing

    Joined Apr 25, 2017
    147 posts, 23 likes
    pearson 26
    US holland mi
    i didn't see that on the MDS yet - but i've been studying primer first. I will look into getting a mask if thats the case.
     



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