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Moving mast winch to cabin top for easier solo sailing

Dec 1, 2020
92
CAL 27 Illahee / Brownsville WA
Hello all,

I have old Barient 9's on the mast and would like to move one to the cabin top along with line clutches to make halyard handling easier when solo-sailing. It's not pretty but works fine.

1619748837353.png


I can't find the manual on L-36 (or Google) for the No. 9. The center screw is loose but I"m concerned that if I pull the drum "bits and pieces" will fall out since I have never worked on winches. Is this a risk with this winch?

My plan is to mount stand-up blocks on the mast base using SS machine screws and taped holes I will drill for the block bases. Then route the lines through a deck organizer and back through a Spinlock clutch. The Barient will be mounted behind the clutch.

Comments about pulling the winch are desired. Thoughts on the re-routing of halyards for solo-sailing welcome.

Rick
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,082
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Rick.
I have several Barient winches, some 17’s Self Tailing on the mast. I feel there are advantages to go to the mast.

Regarding the winch and service to it, there are several ways to safely open the winch. You can wrap a sheet around the mast and dress it out under the winch and fold it into a cardboard box beneath the winch.

I would follow the general procedure for cleaning and lubing the winch. When you get the outer cover off the winch. You should be able to pull the gears out by rotating the pins holding them and removing them.

take a picture-if you get stuck. I’ve been successful with them.
 

RoyS

.
Jun 3, 2012
1,205
Hunter 33 Steamboat Wharf, Hull, MA
If feasible, you may want to put a halyard organizer plate with attachments for turning blocks under your mast. This project, though desirable, will prove costly.
 
Sep 25, 2008
6,313
Alden 50 Sarasota, Florida
It’s likely kelt you’ll want a bigger winch on the cabin as it will need to overcome the additional resistance of all those right angles.
 
May 29, 2018
296
Canel 25 foot Shiogama, japan
Hi Rick
I feel there are advantages to go to the mast.

I am not trying to start an argument, just putting a thought out there and I agree with jssailem.

Rick, you have a 27 footer. That would be three or four steps from the cockpit to the mast.
If your present winch is at the mast you probably have a reefing system that requires you to go to the mast to at least deal with the leach.

to make halyard handling easier when solo-sailing

Realistically under normal sailing conditions, handling the main halyard means hauling it up and lowering it.
Doing this at the mast as you leave the dock and just before you return is quite easily done. Reefing done early and smoothly should not be a hassle.
I suggest you service the winch and sort out good cleats and whinch handle pocket at the mast and get real smooth and fast at working at the mast.

Now to winch servicing.
You will find lots of vids on youtube,

I think these have the bearings in a cage so you wont end up with lots of bearing needles on the deck.
Have someone hold a decent plastic bag under the winch as you remove it just it case.
Drop the parts in a bucket and wash with whatever you like (paraffin, diesel fuel etc).
Reassemble with light grease on the bearings and oil on the pawls.
You will be surprised at how easy it is.

all the best
gary
 
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Dec 1, 2020
92
CAL 27 Illahee / Brownsville WA
IMHO, you'll really appreciate installing a helm control if you single hand a lot. Going forward or below for a beer is eazy peazy :wink:
Do you mean using the Autohelm 2000 tiller unit or something more basic that just holds the tiller fixed while attending to the mast or a beer?
 
Jan 19, 2010
9,997
Hunter 26 Charleston
IMHO, you'll really appreciate installing a helm control if you single hand a lot. Going forward or below for a beer is eazy peazy :wink:
:plus:

I added an auto-tiller to my H26. Makes solo-sailing a joy... I can spend all day fussing with sail trim instead of holding the tiller or just chill out ... or pop my head in the cabin for another "coke"... and it would solve your isses with going to the mast... plus you get all of the other advantages. :cool:
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,082
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Rick... Good question.
The "Tiller Clutch", was my go to extra hand on my Montgomery 15. We sailed together for 20 years, much of it solo. When flipping on the clutch I knew I have limited time to address what ever needed 2 hands before I had to retake control of the tiller. In using this tool you learn that sail boat can be balanced by trimming the sails. When you master this skill you can sail, even in a light centerboard boat, for surprisingly long periods with out having to adjust the rudder by use of the tiller. Changing your weight position is all it takes.

The use of a powered tiller Autopilot, is the more expensive option. These work great and while solo sailing a boat of your size can be like having an extra member of the crew. You still will benefit from balancing your sail plan and timing the sails so that they steer the boat in a straight line. The AP will maintain the bearing set based on the electronics following a compass heading. You will have to manage the power supply. If your sails are balanced and trimmed that power drain will be small. If your sail plan is sloppy or the sea state is sloppy the power drain will be increased logarithmically.

Your third option is crew. Even though your wife is attending the little one, for short stints it is feasible to manage the tiller and attend the little one while Daddy is adjusting the sails at the mast.

Oh the fun of learning and mastering all these skills, You have a ton of opportunity ahead.
 

HMT2

.
Mar 20, 2014
883
Hunter 31 828 Shoreacres, TX
IMHO, you'll really appreciate installing a helm control if you single hand a lot. Going forward or below for a beer is eazy peazy :wink:
I single hand all the time. A few years back I replaced my old autohelm that could only hold a straight(ish) course with a new EV100 that can sail to a course, a wind angle, or a waypoint. Game changer when it comes to hoisting the main. Set the wind angle at 0 and it’s easy peasy lemon squeezy to get the main up.
 
Jan 19, 2010
9,997
Hunter 26 Charleston
I have also had very good results rigging a tiller-to-sheet self steering system on a 22' sailboat. Worked great and I once saile for 4 hours in the Pamlico without touching the tiller only to arrive exactly where I was trying to go. If you have a few spare blocks, some line and a bungee cord, you could rig a test system for free.
 
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Apr 8, 2010
1,620
Ericson Yachts Olson 34 28400 Portland OR
Consider an electric tiller pilot. Also consider the advantages of having the main halyard cleated on the mast where you need to go to put in the reef anyway (accessing the dog bones and horns).
Mostly tho, if you do not have an AP, get one.
I have done a lot a single handing on my previous 26 footer, and on the current boat, and the AP is vital. Absolutely.
 
Dec 1, 2020
92
CAL 27 Illahee / Brownsville WA
Thanks to all for the input. I already have a the tiller pilot 2000 unit, and have only used it for powered transits, but keeping handy when sailing sounds like an approach to test. Just need a handy spot to keep it in the cockpit.
 
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Sep 8, 2020
45
Merit 22 Honker Bay
If you single hand a 27 foot sloop you need an autohelm and halyards led to the cockpit. Unless you have all the room in the world to get your sails up and down.
If the screws used to mount the mast winch go into the mast removing them might be your biggest problem. When I tried it the screws ripped out a considerable amount of aluminum and left some big ugly holes in the mast.

It was easier to find a used winch and install it on the cabin top.
 
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Oct 22, 2014
16,082
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
When I tried it the screws ripped out a considerable amount of aluminum and left some big ugly holes in the mast.
This can be a problem. Especially if the screws have been there long enough to develop a fair amount of corrosion or the previous workmanship used the wrong screws or lacked basic skills of assembly.

Leaving the winches in place is not a big issue. You also can hire a welder to close up the holes and then grind the welds clean. If the welded esthetics are not acceptable you can always paint your mast.
 
Jul 27, 2011
4,530
Bavaria 38E Alamitos Bay
Hello all,

I have old Barient 9's on the mast and would like to move one to the cabin top along with line clutches to make halyard handling easier when solo-sailing. It's not pretty but works fine.

View attachment 193566

I can't find the manual on L-36 (or Google) for the No. 9. The center screw is loose but I"m concerned that if I pull the drum "bits and pieces" will fall out since I have never worked on winches. Is this a risk with this winch?

My plan is to mount stand-up blocks on the mast base using SS machine screws and taped holes I will drill for the block bases. Then route the lines through a deck organizer and back through a Spinlock clutch. The Barient will be mounted behind the clutch.

Comments about pulling the winch are desired. Thoughts on the re-routing of halyards for solo-sailing welcome.

Rick
Hoisting the MS from the cockpit is slow and tiresome. You most likely will still have to leave the helm to do even that. IMHO leave it as it is and practice heaving-to as the means of handling the MS when there is no helmer aboard. Heave-to, ease the mainsheet until boom is aligned with the wind. Go forward and hoist the MS. Return. Ease the back-winded jib to bear away; trim the mainsail and jib, and you’re away.
 
Last edited:
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Mar 26, 2011
2,935
Corsair F-24 MK I Deale, MD
Tiller pilot. The solo sailor's best friend.

Moving the winch can make things worse if you don't get all the angles right, and at the end of the day will not add as much safety or enjoyment as the tiller pilot. The cost won't be much different if good quality parts are used.