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Loosen Shroud Barrel Turnbuckles

Aug 24, 2014
140
Aphrodite 101 148 Coeur d Alene ID
Went to adjust the turnbuckles on the shrouds and they sieze up after a few turns. Any ideas on how to free them up?
 
Feb 21, 2013
3,776
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
Penetrating oil, extended wrench arm to get more leverage and heat are some strategies. Let's see what the forum recommends and please let us know what worked.
 
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Jan 11, 2014
7,827
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
Before you tighten them again, lubricate with a dry lubricant like MacLube or a waterproof lubricant like lanocote. It makes it easier to adjust correctly and prevents galling the threads.
 
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Oct 22, 2014
16,092
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
I’d begin with a penetrating oil to free the turnbuckle. @Project_Mayhem ’s idea or PB Blaster are possible solutions. I have been using Corrosion Block in the spray can. Shake it up, light pressure on the nozzle and a little comes out as a foam. Heavy pressure and you get a stream. I’ve sprayed a little in a small cup and painted it on stuck bolts.

Once free @dlochner ’s lanocoat is on my boat for exactly the solution it provides. Applied to threads it helps to prevent galling and dissimilar metal corrosion.

Good luck.
 
Sep 24, 2018
1,475
O'Day 25 Chicago
While we're mentioning rigging tips, my yard sprays the ends of the cables/turnbuckles with Boesheild T9 to reduce crevice corrosion. I like Jssailem's paintbrush idea. Less mess and you'll probably use less lube
 
Apr 26, 2015
642
S2 26 Mid On Trailer
I'm guessing when you say barrel turnbuckles you are talking about closed stainless steel tube turnbuckles (rigging screws). My suggestion, if you can get them off of the studs, with no stud thread damage, replace them with open body plated bronze style. I've read this quote many times on rigging websites and heard it many times from riggers.

NOTE: Some boats today still have the old, Closed Body/Tubular Style , stainless steel bottles screw type turnbuckle (these should be replaced ASAP with chrome-bronze bodies). To adjust this type of turnbuckle you can use either and appropriately sized Ice Pick or C Sherman Johnson’s purpose made tool (click link and scroll to bottom of page) to stick in the small hole located in the middle of the body. Vise grips or channel locks are not the answer here.
 
Jan 11, 2014
7,827
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
I'm guessing when you say barrel turnbuckles you are talking about closed stainless steel tube turnbuckles (rigging screws). My suggestion, if you can get them off of the studs, with no stud thread damage, replace them with open body plated bronze style. I've read this quote many times on rigging websites and heard it many times from riggers.
Good point. If the stud is SS and the barrel is SS then they can gall or cold weld if there is no lubrication and the barrel is over tensioned. This is a bad outcome.

The open barrel bronze turnbuckles are bronze, the threads on the barrel will strip preventing galling. It is less expensive to replace a stripped turnbuckle than it is to replace the shroud, stud, and turnbuckle.
 
Jan 4, 2006
3,904
Hunter 310 West Vancouver, B.C.
No guarantees here but coat the exposed threads with antisieze compound such as

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It contains micro sized particles of metallic sulphides which keep the surfaces separated.

Real slow is the way to go here. Work it back and forth in small increments.
 
Jan 4, 2006
3,904
Hunter 310 West Vancouver, B.C.
Will this leave a messy streak if someone or something brushes up against it?
This stuff is so messy it will leave a messy streak on someone two boats away if they so much as even glance over this way.

The idea is to get those turnbuckles off without galling or the cost will be a killer to re-do the shroud(s). Once (and if) they can be removed without damage, clean up with solvent and then coat the threads with Super Lube, lanolin, or whatever, but at least something.