Has anyone completed a crossing on their Cherubini?

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Mar 27, 2012
312
Seaward Fox Washougal WA
I love my 1984 H27, but at 6'02 I am looking to upsize. Sleeping in fetal position in vbirth is getting old. Future plans include Portland Oregon to Mexico, Hawaii, and back to states. Looking to upsize and am curious who has crossed or regularly crosses or circumnavigates on their Cherubini. Year, size, and destinations would be great. I have a 1980 h36 nearby and love these boats, but haven't heard of anyone crossing or serious offshore cruising. Anyone care to brag for a bit???
 

Paul F

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Jun 3, 2004
827
Hunter 1980 - 33 Bradenton
Not to pour cold water on your extensive cruising thoughts, but a Hunter Cherubini is not a "blue water" boat. Compare it to a Valiant buildt in the Northwest and you will see the difference. Here for comparison is some information on the Valiant 37.
http://bluewaterboats.org/valiant-esprit-37/
 
Jun 8, 2004
913
C&C Frigate 36 St. Margarets Bay, Nova Scotia
Not to pour cold water on your extensive cruising thoughts, but a Hunter Cherubini is not a "blue water" boat. Compare it to a Valiant buildt in the Northwest and you will see the difference. Here for comparison is some information on the Valiant 37.
http://bluewaterboats.org/valiant-esprit-37/
Sorry to contradict you, but there are Hunter 37 Cutters in the United Kingdom, South America, and Hawaii/Asia/Pacific. Wonder how they got there if they didn't didn't cross some "blue water"? I can't speak for the smaller Hunter Cherubinis, but I wouldn't hesitate to cross an ocean in my 37C with proper preparation. And I would probably arrive before the Valiant :D
 
Jan 7, 2012
112
Hunter 37C Lucaya, Grand Bahama
After ten thousand ocean delivery miles in many different boats I can tell you its more about the planning then the quality of boat. In a 21 day delivery across the Atlantic, timed properly you would be unfortunate to maybe see 2 maybe 3 days of bad weather. As for the Pacific ask the 2 Moore 24's that competed in the Solo Transpac if they're maybe worthy ocean platforms. Those are regatta one design boats that went San Fran/Hawaii.So what's more ruggedly built a 3500lb Moore 24 or a 10 ton H37 C, ask Blaise if the boat's a worthy ocean platform.
 
Nov 8, 2007
1,396
Hunter 27_75-84 Sandusky Harbor Marina, Ohio
H27 from Florida to Yucatan

Tom Manalili singlehanded his Cherubini h27 from Florida to Yucatan and back for a number of years. His mods to the boat and some other comments are in the archives.
 
May 24, 2004
6,790
CC 30 South Florida
Well the Cherubinis have grown old. Those that still sport the original gate valves and standing riggin should be content with staying within coastal waters. I see no problem with passage making in a refitted larger model in the hands of an experienced sailor. Although structural integrity is very important quality for the safety of a blue water boat it is not the only significant consideration. Adequate tankage, storage, cabin comforts and speed are just as desirable. With today's improved communications and weather forecasting many more boats can make successful offshore passages. The Cherubinis enjoy a strong overbuilt hull and can be fitted for blue water passage making but the kicker may be cost. There are some things you cannot do much with like the deck stepped masts but most of the other components and systems can be upgraded. The percentage of necessary upgrades may be larger than on a boat originally designed for offshore duty. I guess the only argument I would entertain about whether the boats are blue water capable would be the one about how many $$$ would you be willing to put into one.
 
Jan 7, 2012
112
Hunter 37C Lucaya, Grand Bahama
Your comments would be true for any boat of the same age. Nobody would undertake any type of offshore passage without first ensuring that the standing rigging running rigging and all other crucial components were up to the task, but that wasn't the comment. To suggest that the Valliant 37 was far superior, vintage for vintage to the H37c is an overstatement. Both boats have similar tankage, similar rigs, similar waterline lengths similar weight but because ones a Hunter and ones a Valliant there must be a significant difference. For the premium paid for the Valliant you could refit a H37c and have money to spare.Don't get me wrong the Valliant is a worthy boat, but I don't see a substantial enough difference to warrant the primium those boats command. I'm not defending the Hunter because I own one. I'm defending it because it's a viable platform to take offshore with minmal changes, ones that won't require you to have a relative that's an understanding banker.
 

Paul F

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Jun 3, 2004
827
Hunter 1980 - 33 Bradenton
Well said Pilotocopilot. My suggestion if Bigjer40 is planning to sail to Hawaii is to also consider other "stonger" boats. You are right about old boats. I have a friend who bought an old '79 Valiant 40 and has put thousands into it refitting it for the Altantic. I also have a friend like me in his 60's, who with his wife saiils the world in a 28 ft boat. There are a lot of Hunters out on the oceans.
 
Sep 26, 2011
228
Hunter 33_77-83 Cedar Creek Sailing Center, NJ
Pilotcopilot is righton. In addition to my H33C, I have a Tanzer 26. There are 3 noted crossings of the Atlantic in the T26 (not by me mind you). I would feel better about such a voyage in my H33C; heavier, better battery banks and solar charging, more sail options, better tankage-stowage-engine-galley-electronics, solid hull construction. However, it will never happen. We are content with coastal cruising with an occassional thought of the virgin islands and bahamas. Never the less, there is plenty of trouble in these areas without having to go 21 days crossing a big blue body of water. For me its a peaceful recreation with a bit of excitement thrown in to keep me on my toes. That is all I require. If I decide I want to crusie the Med or Archepelligo of Denmark some day, I would be content to fly and then take a bare boat charter.
 

Blaise

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Jan 22, 2008
359
Hunter 37-cutter Bradenton
I have made four trans ats, eight trans gulfs (of Mexico), sailed my boat down to South America and back, been pitch poled, knocked down,and had the boat pushed high and dry in a hurricane. Is this boat as strong as a Valient, probably not. But it is strong enough for pretty much anything blue water, and will beat the Valient to the destinationn 30% faster. That equates to 30% less exposure. I have sailed the crap out of this boat for 34 years and it will take more than I can.

Midnight Sun HAS been continually updated and improved. No one should head offshore in a thirty year old boat that hasn't been, no matter who built it. And by the way, I have a friend that has a 1977 Hunter 27 that has made 55 gulf crossings.
 
Mar 27, 2012
312
Seaward Fox Washougal WA
Thanks gents! Post wasn't a generic "what blue water boat should I buy"! I have two beautiful Valiants in my marina. I was more interested in Cherubini's out there doing it. Of course they are not going to be OE and have been refitted. I went to a cruising seminar last week. The three gents speaking agreed they dominantly see older "paid for boats" with handy crew aboard in their exotic anchorages. I am not locked in to the Cherubini's but I do like them. Also looking at a 34' Formosa on yacht world in Portland Oregon. I'm on a 15 year plan that has current H27 sold and new boat paid for and refitted before cutting lines. Thanks Blaise for your experience! Any others out there in Blue Water?
 
Jun 5, 2010
1,067
Hunter 25 Burlington NJ
It ain't the boat, it's the motion.

I have to agree with Pilotocopilot and others who see the logic in this position. In terms of seamanship, the readiness of the boat is paramount, second only to the readiness of the skipper. A boat 'designed to' cross oceans, but in neglected or naive condition, is far worse than a commoner boat well-prepared for the voyage at hand.

I have rebuilt my own H25 extensively and, aside for the cabinside deadlights which I would definitely improve were I seriously contemplating such a trip, I would take it offshore on a voyage of any length that its smallish size would allow the provisions to let me sail. As it is now, it is eminently qualified for a 7-to-10-day offshore passage from NJ to FL, which may well be in my spring cruising plans.

(PS I am so little a fan of Bob Perry's work-- for a myriad of reasons perhaps too personal or too esoteric to go into here-- that I would be loathe to prefer a Valiant or any of his designs over a similar boat responsibly prepared... but that's just me.)
 
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