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Deck wash

Jun 17, 2012
165
Hunter 356 Mackinaw City, MI
I have a 2002 356. We spend the entire summer on the Great Lakes. That always means bugs covering the deck on most mornings. It’s such a pain hauling my water pail up over the bow a kazillion times (always on anchor). So are there any sailors out there who have designed and or installed a simple deck wash system? I would even be interested in a portable overboard sump or something like that. Thanks for any ideas.
 
Jun 1, 2016
128
Hunter 28.5 Lake City, MN
I’d suggest starting with the Starbright Non-Skid Deck wax. It keeps a lot of the dirt, blood and debris from soaking into the deck. Should make the cleanup a bit easier.

Sir Michael
 
Jul 7, 2004
7,922
Hunter 30T Cheney, KS
Only advice I can give also. The more the deck is sealed, the easier it will be to clean. Good luck with your project
 
Oct 22, 2014
15,867
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Electrical water pump. Hose with sprayer.
 
Apr 8, 2011
463
Hunter 36 Deale, MD
I take it you don't have a washdown hose in the anchor locker? You might think about installing one. My H36 (later version of your 356) has one installed with the washdown pump under the forward berth on the starboard side, and the raw water line is teed off of the through hull for the air conditioning, so no additional through hull is needed. The hose goes up through the deck on the inside of the anchor locker. It is invaluable for washing the thick Chesapeake mud off of the anchor here - I wouldn't own another boat without it. You could also use it, with a longer hose in a pinch, to wash the decks down and not bite into your fresh water tank reserves.

The other consideration is power, but since I have an electric windlass installed - which I bet you do - that's not a problem at all. The pump is wired to the windlass power, so your wire run is pretty short.

Its all easily accessible if you pull out the mattresses and pull up the inspection/access boards already there, and then roll on your back and take off the cover of the box that is at the foot of the v-berth and you'll see the windlass and wiring all within arms reach.
 
Jun 17, 2012
165
Hunter 356 Mackinaw City, MI
Thank you tfox2069! I do plenty of plumbing and electrical so this is a simple one. I installed the winch on this vessel. But unfortunately I don’t have AC. And I don’t want another thru-hull. So I was thinking the head pickup. But it is at the other extremes near the stern. So that makes running a pex line behind all the panels a bit involved. What do you think?
 
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May 20, 2020
19
Hunter 30 Nelson BC
One of the various kits available will meet your needs, but if you'd like so save a few sheckles, Cruising World had an article on building your own washdown pump over the winter. Sorry can't find it online with a quick search but dig around and I'm sure you'll find it.
 
Apr 8, 2011
463
Hunter 36 Deale, MD
Thank you tfox2069! I do plenty of plumbing and electrical so this is a simple one. I installed the winch on this vessel. But unfortunately I don’t have AC. And I don’t want another thru-hull. So I was thinking the head pickup. But it is at the other extremes near the stern. So that makes running a pex line behind all the panels a bit involved. What do you think?
Almost all the thru hulls on my boat (and I assume yours since they're so similar) are situated at the foot of the cockpit ladder in the cabin. That's awesome most of the time, since you have to pull up exactly one deck panel to actuate/inspect all your seacocks. The one exception on my boat is the macerator seacock in the stern's port locker, but I removed my macerator completely and capped off the thru hull since I can't pump out anywhere in the Chesapeake.

But in your case that means you'll need to run hose from bow to midships. I do NOT recommend running it behind any panels, because if it ever leaks you want it to have a short drop into your bilge, and not all over other wiring and electrical components also behind panels. So one suggestion I would have is to follow your freshwater line (G below) from your water tank in the bow(A below) back to the manifold under the sink in the galley (J below). Hopefully there's space alongside that line, and once you get it to the galley its just a couple of feet to the centrally located seacocks. You probably already have this in your manual, but if not here's a screenshot of the 356 manual on this site which shows your plumbing lines. Interestingly it labels the bow freshwater tank as a "hot water tank", even though the actual hot water tank is under your aft bunk. I don't know whether the water line (G) is behind the removable panels and (hopefully) low, or under the settee.

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May 20, 2020
19
Hunter 30 Nelson BC
One of the various kits available will meet your needs, but if you'd like so save a few sheckles, Cruising World had an article on building your own washdown pump over the winter. Sorry can't find it online with a quick search but dig around and I'm sure you'll find it.
still can't find it online, but it's on page 63 of the April 2021 issue - probably still in the news stands...
 
Jun 17, 2012
165
Hunter 356 Mackinaw City, MI
Thanks again Tfox2069 -and to all who responded. So I get it. Run my flex line under the floor panels from rear a thru hull below the companionway and go under the floor panels and continue to the V berth and up to the anchor locker. Sounds easy--peasy. Last question; I like the idea of powering the pump by splicing into the windlass harness- but where should I locate the pump for optimum performance? if I put it near the seacock it will have to push the water all the way to the anchor locker and I would have to run the power from the locker back to the pump. Any comments? Jim
 
Oct 22, 2014
15,867
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
It is a push me pull me question. Your pump will state the lift specification.
i.e.Priming Capabilities: 6 feet (1.8 m) suction lift.
It identifies the vertical distance the pump can pull water up to it self to prime and then pump water to the spray nozzle.

The closer the pump is above the water, the easier it is to pull the water, the happier the pump is.
 
Feb 14, 2014
5,630
Hunter 430 Waveland, MS
I like the idea of powering the pump by splicing into the windlass harness- but where should I locate the pump for optimum performance?
What pump did you buy?
They will give you the Pump info so you can properly size the lines and distances.

Splicing may not be good Terminology. I would install a new breaker [ per ABYC standards] in a spare slot on you Power Panel.
____
Also you have to easily reach your isolation valves.
Electrical water pump. Hose with sprayer.
If you bought this pump, it was designed to run dry [but not for long periods].

Jim...

PS: If you fail to turn the pump off or a line fails, you can fill your boat with water and sink it.
PSS: I can help you with the line size, distances and best performance spot.
 
Apr 8, 2011
463
Hunter 36 Deale, MD
My pump is installed under the forward bunk, on the starboard side. No opinion on whether to put it aft or forward, but it pumps just fine pulling the water from the midships seacock to the bow. I'd err on the side of a more powerful pump up there so you can really get a solid stream on mud and other stuff on the anchor and rode. You'll regret going cheap or underpowered.